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lgreen

lgreen's Ultimate Guide To Nano Fish

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"If you do not

your source, that is plagerism, and basically stealing."

 

Totally and utterly WRONG. This is the attitude that is the root of so many of the problems we as consumers have with DRM and other crap like that we get from the RIAA and MPAA.

 

It is not stealing, it is copyright violation, which is totally different. "Protection of intellectual property" has gone completely overboard IMO.

 

[/end rant]

 

EDIT: Sorry for hijacking your thread, this is just something I feel strongly about. And for the record, everything I have ever posted here is released under the GPL documentation license for anyone to copy/reproduce/sell if they wish. :)

Edited by sammydee

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copyrighting every post is rediculous yes, i dont do that. however, this is something I wrote outside of nano-reef and spent a descent amount of time writing.

 

it is no different than if i started posting sections from michael paletta's books on here and claiming i wrote them.

 

that would be plagerism.

 

should some other idaho reefer be able to copy and paste this into our reef clubs news letter and put their name as the author?

 

if someone takes the article on nano fish I wrote and posts it or publishes it as their own, then it is plagerism.

Edited by lgreen

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Hey lgreen, great guide and thanks!

 

Under Wrasses, you have the 4-Line listed as a 10g min., but I have had this fish before and I have to say that a 10g is not enough room at all, 20g min for sure. They like to hunt pods and weeve in and out of tight crevisses of the LR. There's just not enough room for that type of stuff to be happening in a 10g.

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lgreen: neat thread :)

 

any specific reason that I couldn't keep a bicolor pseudochromis in a 7? doesn't seem much larger than a clown?

 

TIA

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sounds good

 

thanks

 

lgreen: neat thread :)

 

any specific reason that I couldn't keep a bicolor pseudochromis in a 7? doesn't seem much larger than a clown?

 

TIA

 

honestly, i don't like the idea of a clown in a 7g, but i've seen a ton of people do it.

 

i think a diadem would be ok, but not cure on the bicolor. what do you guys think?

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sounds good

 

thanks

 

Was that dirrected at my comment on the Fourline?

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So are you going to change it on the guys to read: -Fourline Wrasse (3”, 20g min, 30g+ ideal)

 

???

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Interesting read. I've seen something similar before.

 

;)

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nah, no sticky please.

 

I still get crap about the last thing I got sticked, and I'm sure I will never here the end of it.

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"Also keep in mind I may list some things that are pushing it. I don’t know whether you are a beginner or expert, if you know how to do a water change or not, so I will assume anyone who uses this guide has some common sense and basic understanding of nano reefing. For example, the fact that I list some fish appropriate for a 0.5g and 2.5g tank, does not automatically mean you should keep a fish in a tank that size. Rather, it means if you are capable of maintaining the added bioload of keeping a fish in a tank that size, then these fish would be appropriate choices."

Totally agree with both of you, but like i said, in some cases i may push the limits. Different people will be at different skill levels and what not, so i would rather provide an answer that covers everyone that just say no period. Although i wouldn't keep fish in a tank under 5g.

 

I'm not a huge fan of inch per gallon rules.

 

for example, 4 inch lion in a 30g is going to be a lot different than a 4 inch goby in a 30g.

 

ok, for general, but you wont catch me using them.

I'd be glad to change it. Do you happen to have any literature or anything where I could confirm that? Michael's books seems to suggest it both ways, so i'd be interested to see if algae play a role only as you say, or if they are also able to use the algae directly for nutrition.

 

 

 

On the question of Rainford Goby's here is the opinion of Anthony Calfo as posted on www.Wetwebmedia.com (Properly cited, of course)

 

"Rainford's goby is notorious for being very difficult to keep for long in captivity and this is largely because of its seemingly strict dietary requirements. The nature of its substrate is truly secondary to this dietary need as they have been observed on both hard and soft substrates as you have noted. For many years the common denominator to their success in captivity has been a constant supply of hair algae (Derbesia or like species have been "employed" perhaps inferior to turf algae) Since such algae is generally considered to be unsightly and a nuisance... many Rainford gobies are not kept healthy for very long. Turf algae species are really perhaps more appropriate and their recent popularity in algal scrubbers and subsequent methods for cultivating a continuous supply may help keep species such as the Rainford goby. Ironically, it may not be the algae at all that they need to feed upon but rather the zooplankton attracted to the dense mats of algae. Regardless... are you really prepared to turn your 350l display into a field of algae for this fish? Most people would not be willing, but you have said that you are interested in a biotope display. If so, I hope I have reassured you that you need not worry so much about the nature of the substrate and rather to focus on cultivating turf algae and incidentals within it for keeping the magnificent Rainford goby. "

 

HTH

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Thanks for finding that

 

That is what I suspected. Seems there is some uncertainty to exactly why Ranfordi's eat algae.

 

Calfo suggests they may eat algae for zooplankton as a possibility, but the says "regardless" so I am assuming he is not 100% sure either.

 

Interesting.

 

I'll just leave them as a herbivore for now, as it seems either way regardless they need the algae to survive. Whether or not they actually eat the algae or not, who knows.

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Please add my voice to those wishing you'd make this a sticky. We'll all support you in this. And you wouldn't have to bump it regularly. :)

 

Also, I couldn't agree with you more regarding plagiarism. The poster who thinks protection of intellectual property has "gone too far" probably just doesn't have any to protect...

 

Thanks for all the work on this.

 

--Diane

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Poor lg and his empty hopes. :D

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how about neon gobies? the carribean blue and the other yellow neon goby is REALLY tiny. 1g +?

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Great work! Thanks for taking the time to do something like this.

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I just saw this for the first time....lgreen...are you OK? No fevers? You know, Woody Allen once said that if the 'frequency' drops to less than once every 8 months, you'd better check into it..........

 

BTW, you can add tailspot blenny, ecsenius stigmatura to your blenny list. Good job..but....uh...oh never mind kohei. SH

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im pretty sure pink skunks only get to 3", at least thats what "Clownfishes" by Joyce Wilkerson says. btw, great thread. please make this a sticky. :D

 

Travis

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