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seabass

Seabass's In-wall 100 Gallon

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seabass

I just placed an order for a NC solenoid, NO solenoid, and a float switch (and float valve).

I'm not sure yet, but now I'm thinking about adding another NC solenoid to discharge the high TDS RO water prior to the daily top offs.

 

This solenoid would be located on a T fitting between the RO output and DI input. It would open for a minute or two prior to the scheduled top off. In effect, it would drain RO water that is high in TDS so that it doesn't pass through the DI resin. It would also run off of a timer (or more likely, a controller*). I know that would add some expense, but extending the life of the DI resin would help make that up over time.

 

Sound complicated? It's really not. My plan is that this will eventually top off a series of two to three tanks, so it would help spread out the cost per each tank.

 

 

*I couldn't find a decent, inexpensive, digital timer that could program two outlets independently; so it looks like I'll have to use two channels on my RKII controller.

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Giga

Cool in wall project, I took a slightly different approach to in wall. Very cool ideas here

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seabass

So I got my order from AutoTopOff.com. Everything was packed with care (with bubble wrap, newspaper, and packing paper) and arrived in good shape.

Here's the NO solenoid and float switch.
061713a.jpg

The solenoid is normally open, so the water can flow through to the float valve (which will control the water level). However, if the float switch get activated, it will power the solenoid and close the water supply (preventing more water from entering the sump). The float switch will be mounted a little higher than the water line (set by the float valve).

 

Actually, the float switch and float valves will be mounted to the other side of their brackets.

And with the float valve.
061713b.jpg
I'm pretty sure the bulk of the cost was for the acrylic bracket.

The heavy duty NC solenoid is big and heavy compared to the normal NO solenoid that I got for the sump.
061713c.jpg

I will likely attach a longer cord on this solenoid (depending on where everything gets placed). It gets plugged into a timer (actually, a Digital Aquatics controller). Since it's normally closed, I can program the controller to power the solenoid for just a little longer than it takes to top off the tank.

 

The water goes through standard RO (1/4" OD) tubing. It passes through the NC solenoid first, then the NO solenoid, and finally to the float valve. I'll probably still add another NC solenoid to flush the high TDS RO water just prior to top offs.

 

I'll post more pics when I'm ready to setup the sump.

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seabass

Rock container test results:

  • phosphate: 0.07ppm
  • ammonia: 8+ ppm
  • nitrate: 2ppm

 

I've been dosing Seaklear (lanthanum chloride) daily to deal with the phosphate coming from the rocks. I performed this last phosphate test 24 hours after the last dose. I'm wondering if it's binding more alkalinity than phosphate at this point (as the water still clouds up when I dose the Brute canister).

 

With ammonia still high, I'll continue to dose Seaklear Phosphate Remover until ammonia becomes undetectable. Then I'll perform a 100% water change and let it sit for a couple of days without dosing any more lanthanum chloride (to see if it is still leaching phosphate).

 

Looks like it might be getting closer. I might to have to step up my efforts to ready this tank.

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Lalani

So exciting. :)

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seabass

I tested ammonia again; it was still over 8 ppm. Looks like jedimasterben was dead on and the ammonia was too high for the bacteria to become established on a more typical schedule.

I thought about doing a water change, but decided the biofilter wasn't far enough along to justify using salt mix. So I just emptied the Brute canister and put the rocks in freshwater. I'll have to establish the biofilter later.

Pumps.
060613a.jpg
Lots of flocculants collected on (and in) the the pumps. I assume it's precipitated phosphate, but it could be alkalinity too.

Bottom of the barrel.
060613b.jpg
Lots of precipitation on the bottom.

I'll continue to soak it and add Seaklear Phosphate Remover. Supposedly it's more effected if freshwater anyway (less alkalinity to precipitate out).

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Mstefa1

Is your tank done yet?

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seabass

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ifarmer

hi seabass.

what happened to you beloved 17.4 tank? still running?

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seabass

Nah, I had to move it and haven't set it up again (plus I lost the seagrass in the move). :( I still have the tank and equipment, but it's dry at the moment. I have to come up with an idea for another nano. Maximum size of a "nano" is debatable, but I bet you can't find anybody that would call 100 gallons a nano. I still have to get this one up and running first.

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najluni15

I call my 120 a nano...so there!!!! Haha. I guess we're stuck in the large tank forum

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ifarmer

great job on this setup.

Let's keep the photo rolling.

 

After reading your 17.4g build thread last year. I went and setup a nano last year as well.

Ohh boy, I was not able to keep things stable in such a small tank. I gave up on the small tank and now it's sitting in storage and dry just like your :)

 

I just upgraded to a 110g as well. still waiting for the tank to be build by miracles. I do not think tank bigger than 30g is considered a nano though.

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seabass

great job on this setup. Let's keep the photo rolling.

Thanks! Yeah, more pics soon. I think the rocks are leaching a lot less phosphate. Next, I'm going to add a single baffle to a 40 breeder for a sump, and the stand is still in the garage (not 100% completed).
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seabass

I stopped dosing Seaklear to the container of rocks for a few days to check the phosphate levels. My Hanna Phosphate Checker couldn't detect any phosphate. Now the water is currently freshwater and not saltwater, so I'm not 100% sure that the reagent works the same. However, I assume it still does as I've registered phosphate levels using the Checker before.

 

This seems promising, so I just ordered some more Dr Tim's One and Only to get the biofilter started (I'll keep the ammonia level below 2ppm this time). I'll put the rocks into saltwater tonight and add the bacteria next week.

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eitallent

Great progress! Aren't you excited? I was so excited when my rocks were finally ready. :D

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seabass

Great progress! Aren't you excited? I was so excited when my rocks were finally ready. :D

Yep, I was wondering just how long it would take. I feel this has taken sooooo long, but I'm glad that I didn't just rinse them out and put them in my new tank.

 

 

 

It's probably kind of early to be thinking of stocking pods. However, does anybody have some good suggestions for buying pods online?

 

Maybe Tisbe copepods?

 

Live plankton?

 

Grammarus amphipods?

 

I could have sworn that I bookmarked a site that sold a diversity, but I'm not finding it right now.

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jedimasterben

Just get some macroalgaes and the pods pack from Reefcleaners. It's the next best thing to going and grabbing a handful of macros from the ocean.

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seabass

Just get some macroalgaes and the pods pack from Reefcleaners. It's the next best thing to going and grabbing a handful of macros from the ocean.

Thanks, I must have skipped right over this. I thought they offered something besides Tisbe pods.

 

Everything will be too sterile for them at first, I think I'll start with some phytoplankton and wait for the bacteria to become more established. Then I'll add some pods.

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jedimasterben

Nah, once you get them, just start dumping in food. The copepods will eat that, and the amphipods will eat the copepods and will get to detritus once you get some going.

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seabass

I decided to simplify the top bracing. The bottom cross braces will support the edges and middle of the the 40 breeder sump.
072713a.jpg

With the tops installed.
072713b.jpg

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seabass

Got my Dr Tim's One and Only in again, so it's time to establish a biofilter.

 

For livestock in this tank, I was going to put in whatever I had (from wherever). However, now I'm thinking about making this an Indo-Pacific tank. This means that I'll have even less livestock for it, but I think I'll be happier in the long run. It will probably be quite some time before this tank looks impressive.

 

I was going to house my collection of Rock Flower Anemones in here; so down the road, I might have do a Caribbean nano for them instead. So this tank will get my Mini Carpets and BTAs.

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eitallent

Caribbean! Yay! :)

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seabass

Caribbean! Yay!

I'm actually getting psyched about it. I'm thinking about using my Mr Aqua 17.1 gallon, and keeping:

  • Royal Gramma
  • Gorgonians
  • Flower Anemones
  • Ricordea Polyps
  • Zoanthids
  • aquacultured Staghorn Coral
  • Astrae Snails
  • Cerith Snails
  • Nassarius Snails
  • Blue Leg Hermits
  • Maybe even a Pincushion Urchin

 

Of course this will be after I get this 100gal Indo-Pacific reef up and running.

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1.0reef

Indo Pacific you say?

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seabass

Yeah, the main thing that I won't be including (that I was initially planning to keep in this 100gal), are the Rock Flower Anemones. I haven't really paid much attention to regions in the past, but think I'll try to start on this tank. Plus it gives me a theme for my unused nano (which I couldn't decide on, but was hoping to start again too). The list of Caribbean corals is a lot smaller, so it should work out pretty well for a nano.

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