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halfpint

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Ocho Cinco

Oh. I think that's what I have. My tank was a gift and thay gave that with it. It's like little shells and other stuff. I did otice it changes into some nasty colors!

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halfpint

I do believe that one of the major problems with crushed coral (or any loosly packed substrate) is that it doesn't promote the proper aerobic and anaerobic bacteria growth. It's such large pieces that food and detritus falls down into it where the CUC can't reach it to clean it up, and can cause Nitrate problems. It also allows a lot of water flow. I'm pretty sure that a properly mature sand bed is undisturbed without water flowing through it, for the most part.

 

 

On a side note, I'm glad to see that this thread is growing steadily. It would be nice if it were better organized though.

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fiction101

This has already been mentioned, but don't rush out and fill your tank with corals within the first two months. Be selective about the corals you buy, as time goes on your coral preference will most likely change. I see so many new tanks stocked full with the same common corals and most likely half of the corals in those tanks will be sold/traded away at some point.

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Withers
This has already been mentioned, but don't rush out and fill your tank with corals within the first two months. Be selective about the corals you buy, as time goes on your coral preference will most likely change. I see so many new tanks stocked full with the same common corals and most likely half of the corals in those tanks will be sold/traded away at some point.

 

+1,000

 

I see people's 10 gallon tanks in here that have more corals than my 75 does after a year. Give'em room to grow in!

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d0ughb0y

Just to add. Search here sux. It is better to search from google using for example, searching for nano skimmer,

 

nano skimmer :site: nano-reef.com

 

will make google search for the phrase in nano-reef.com only, where both words exists in the same message. The search here will give you a useless result that contains any one of the words.

 

Regarding DIY, if for educational purpose as mentioned, then it is an excellent idea. But certainly not for saving money or to get something that looks good. Some DIY articles gives a misleading impression that it will cost less, and if you look closely, the materials list looks like this, have this part laying around, cost $0, got that part from a friend, cost $0, total cost, $0.

 

 

4. Use the SEARCH BUTTON on this site, it saves lives also

 

6. If you have the time and patience learn to build some of the simple things you could buy. Knowing how everything works in your tank makes you a better aquarist.

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revaltion131

I've read and reread this thread, as well as others talking about RO water. I was originally planning on using tap, and the book I had purchased claimed that it was fine provided you took the time to find out what your local water company added to it and treated it appropriately. So, here's a short flurry of questions I have unanswered:

 

If I know what's in my tap and can treat the water effectively for it, what are the other drawbacks/issues with using tap? What is the normal cost of RO/DI water and where should I look to purchase it? (My LFS does not supply it.)

 

I will be using a 34g Solana set up, if that matters.

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mmelnick
It doesn't need to be 8 pages of crap. Just 1 or 2 pages of good, useful information.

 

 

Hey look.... page 8 of crap :P

 

I've read and reread this thread, as well as others talking about RO water. I was originally planning on using tap, and the book I had purchased claimed that it was fine provided you took the time to find out what your local water company added to it and treated it appropriately. So, here's a short flurry of questions I have unanswered:

 

If I know what's in my tap and can treat the water effectively for it, what are the other drawbacks/issues with using tap? What is the normal cost of RO/DI water and where should I look to purchase it? (My LFS does not supply it.)

 

I will be using a 34g Solana set up, if that matters.

 

If you want to use tap go ahead, but don;t be surprised when you have forests of algae and your coral is pissed because there is copper or lead or who knows what in the water. People always try to get around it, and in a FORLR tank maybe you can. But when you combine coral with the light required to keep it, you are going to have one hell of an algae problem.

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HankB
If I know what's in my tap and can treat the water effectively for it ...

 

Start by finding out what's in your tap water. In Chicago they add polyphosphate to inhibit corrosion. I don't know how much makes it to the user, but I have algae problems in our Brita water filter pitcher. :P If that's common practice, you might face the same issue. They also use Chloramine which I believe feeds the nitrogen cycle.

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blitzy

Okie Dokie where to start. I am currently in the proocess of starting my tank the water has been cycling for about 1 week and i have researched as much as i can but i have a few probably silly questions.

1. I have a atm biological filter on my freshwater tank which will be used for the sw once i have the water cycled. and just read in this thread that bio-balls are no good is this true and how about active carbon?

2. When people say i have a 20g set up is that like 20litres or im not sure?

3.The spot that i have in mind is in direct sunlight will this be beneficial or harmul to my setup?

 

Thats all i can think of atm plaese bare with me as i have learnt the hard way when i started my freshwater tank and want to get this right the first time.

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Sexy Shrimp

this is the thread for answers not questions. if you post in the beginners section you might have more responses :)

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Withers
If I know what's in my tap and can treat the water effectively for it, what are the other drawbacks/issues with using tap? What is the normal cost of RO/DI water and where should I look to purchase it? (My LFS does not supply it.)

 

That's not possible, especially if you live in the city. Reef tanks are complex systems and the stuff that gets added to tap water is completely foreign in coral reefs and as such may have an unforeseeable effect on your corals.

 

The normal cost of an RO/DI unit ranges from about $100 to $200 and the filters will easily last you a year. Before I had my own filter I was paying anything from $.35 a gallon to $.10 a gallon.

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lakshwadeep
That's not possible, especially if you live in the city. Reef tanks are complex systems and the stuff that gets added to tap water is completely foreign in coral reefs and as such may have an unforeseeable effect on your corals.

 

The normal cost of an RO/DI unit ranges from about $100 to $200 and the filters will easily last you a year. Before I had my own filter I was paying anything from $.35 a gallon to $.10 a gallon.

 

+1. "Treating" tap water is not the same as "filtering" tap water. Filtering your water is the only way to remove unwanted compounds and ions. Treating, at best, only neutralizes the toxicity of certain things like chlorine/chloramine; it does not remove them from the water.

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jwalsh1

I know Im a n00b to reefs, but I do have lots of aquarium experience and I have 3 suggestions that may apply:

 

1. When you can, sent up a quarentene tank. I wish I would have. Learn that QT means quarintene tank because its difficult to spell!

 

2. Try your best to use the scientific names when referring or researching something; it assures that you are all referring to the same creature. Sometimes a creature may have several different names and their care requirements can be vastly different.

 

3. Have fun and learn and share what youve learned. Thats what this is all about anyway. Also, many new things have been learned about corals from hobbyists, maybe someday you can contribute to the greater scientific knowledge!

Edited by jwalsh1

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unbeatablebonz
ooo ooo, i have a list:

 

1. Stability is key

2. Bigger = easier to keep stable

3. Ammonia -> Nitrites then Nitrates

4. Ammonia and nitrites need to be zero before anything

5. When in doubt wait 2 weeks

6. When stocking only add critters once a month

7. At least 1lb. of rock per gallon

8. Live sand is not needed, it will be seeded from live rock

9. Put as much sand in as is pleasing to the eye

10. No crushed coral. Anywhere.

11. Tonga, Fiji, Marshal etc. Whichever looks best to you

12. Less fish = room for error when the unexpected happens

13. The unexpected will happen

14. Yes you are probably overstocked

15. No anemones under 25 gallons.

16. No tangs unless you have a bigger tank to move them to later.

17. Good stuff doesn’t come cheap

18. You get what you pay for

19. Refugiums aren’t required

20. Refugium > no refugium

21. Chaeto is a nice macro algae to use in a refugium

22. Skimmers aren’t required.

23. Skimmers are nice

24. Good nano skimmers are(in no particular order):

a. Cora-Life Super Skimmer

b. Remora

c. ASM

25. Skimmer and a refugium are both good additions

26. Yes a Remora will fit on a 10gal.

27. Water-changes weekly are a very good idea

28. Change 10%-20% water a week for good results

29. IO is a good salt

30. So are pretty much all salt brands

31. Light 8-12 hours a day is a good idea

32. No your Ph doesn’t have to be 8.2

33. Ph of 7.8 is fine

34. Ph of 8.4 is fine

35. Don’t add any supplements without testing

36. This includes Ph buffer

37. Rule of thumb: 1 clean up crew critter per gallon

38. Stability is key

39. Get a refractometer already

40. MH or T5’s for clams and acropora

41. 250W of MH is probably a little overkill

42. PC’s can probably be used for everything else

43. 6500k yellow light

44. 10000k white light

45. 20000k blue light

46. Use RO water

47. RODI > Distilled > RO > whatever else

48. Don’t use bottled drinking water

49. Don’t use spring water

50. Don’t use tap water

51. Cyano problems (red slimy algae, grows everywhere)

a. Less feeding

b. 8 hour lighting period

c. More flow

d. More water changes

e. Vacuum your sand already

52. Don’t let the snail rot in your tank

53. Don’t feed primarily brine shrimp (good for treats once in a while)

54. DT’s only if you want more pods or have clams

55. Flakes are fine, frozen is probably better

56. Variety is best for fish food

57. 10x-20x you tank volume water turnover rate is a good number to aim for with your powerheads

58. Turbulent flow > direct flow

59. Have at least two sources of water flow for best turbulence

60. When in doubt refer to rule #1.

 

 

Really Great Stuff!

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TheCurriculum

Food for thought on your LFS

 

Stop by your LFS on a regular basis

 

1. Get to know the employees and be nice, what goes around comes around

2. Even if your not buying they should be getting new corals on a regular basis, find out how often and just go check it out. They will notice you come in and what goes around comes around when you do buy

3. Find out if the LFS buys farm raised \ wild corals.... Get tank raised if possible!!! they usually do better in the tank anyways (tons of post about this debate on lots of sites) and it helps keeps a few more guys in the ocean.

4. If you are nice to them they will be nice to you (I got 5 kenya tree frags for 10 bucks ...$2 a piece is a lot nicer than 5 or 10 a piece)

5. Talk to all of the employees and find out about their tanks and what websites they recommend

---if they don't recommend any sites or say they are a waste of time, you may want to look for a new LFS

6. Find out what saltmixes they use and ask to see their sump \ fuge \ etc... systems setups for their main tanks if they aren't out in the open.

---side note:... if there main tanks are dirty and full of crap, you will be bringing it back to your tank.

7. Don't be afraid if you see a little bubble algae in a LFS tank (I mean a real small amount, it does come in on their stock) Most likely they will have a few crabs in there to knock it out. Most of the time you won't see any. --- This should not be a regular theme at the LFS but it does happen

8. For starting your nano a good LFS will give you the 5 to 10 gallons of water out of their main tank supply to start your tank off (It's coming out of an established tank with all of the good stuff already in it, this does help with establishing your tank) -- Seen debates about this also -- remember ... Search Read Search Read

9. Ask if they will order for you. You really like a specific type of zoo... Well ask if they can get it and how much... if they can get it for 20% more or less buy local.... ex. $20 frag online + shipping (don't forget this when you are comparing to a LFS price) then do a 20% markup and it's more than fair

---- You will see I got my tank for 20 to 50 bucks cheaper online ... well don't forget the 10 to 20 bucks in shipping, 25+ for overnight :P .... and instant gratification is always nice.

10. If a coral just came in and you want it, ask them to hold it for a few days to make sure it's healthy (any good LFS will do this)

11. Pay the few extra bucks for any test strips \ additives you use at the LFS (little things like that help keep them open)

12. lots of other things about the LFS but you get the idea

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deltalead13

Thanks guys/gals! This noob appreciates all the info and Nano-Reef.com! You guys rock!

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Withers
Food for thought on your LFS

 

Stop by your LFS on a regular basis

 

1. Get to know the employees and be nice, what goes around comes around

2. Even if your not buying they should be getting new corals on a regular basis, find out how often and just go check it out. They will notice you come in and what goes around comes around when you do buy

3. Find out if the LFS buys farm raised \ wild corals.... Get tank raised if possible!!! they usually do better in the tank anyways (tons of post about this debate on lots of sites) and it helps keeps a few more guys in the ocean.

4. If you are nice to them they will be nice to you (I got 5 kenya tree frags for 10 bucks ...$2 a piece is a lot nicer than 5 or 10 a piece)

5. Talk to all of the employees and find out about their tanks and what websites they recommend

---if they don't recommend any sites or say they are a waste of time, you may want to look for a new LFS

6. Find out what saltmixes they use and ask to see their sump \ fuge \ etc... systems setups for their main tanks if they aren't out in the open.

---side note:... if there main tanks are dirty and full of crap, you will be bringing it back to your tank.

7. Don't be afraid if you see a little bubble algae in a LFS tank (I mean a real small amount, it does come in on their stock) Most likely they will have a few crabs in there to knock it out. Most of the time you won't see any. --- This should not be a regular theme at the LFS but it does happen

8. For starting your nano a good LFS will give you the 5 to 10 gallons of water out of their main tank supply to start your tank off (It's coming out of an established tank with all of the good stuff already in it, this does help with establishing your tank) -- Seen debates about this also -- remember ... Search Read Search Read

9. Ask if they will order for you. You really like a specific type of zoo... Well ask if they can get it and how much... if they can get it for 20% more or less buy local.... ex. $20 frag online + shipping (don't forget this when you are comparing to a LFS price) then do a 20% markup and it's more than fair

---- You will see I got my tank for 20 to 50 bucks cheaper online ... well don't forget the 10 to 20 bucks in shipping, 25+ for overnight :P .... and instant gratification is always nice.

10. If a coral just came in and you want it, ask them to hold it for a few days to make sure it's healthy (any good LFS will do this)

11. Pay the few extra bucks for any test strips \ additives you use at the LFS (little things like that help keep them open)

12. lots of other things about the LFS but you get the idea

 

That's a good list but you forgot a major one.

 

Take all advice given by LFS employees with a large grain of salt. They have a financial interest in you and their advice can and will be heavily biased towards purchasing something from their store. Do your own research, most of the time you'll actually be more knowledgeable about the hobby than they are and you can find an answer and a solution to anything online if you know where to look and who to trust.

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Sexy Shrimp
8. For starting your nano a good LFS will give you the 5 to 10 gallons of water out of their main tank supply to start your tank off (It's coming out of an established tank with all of the good stuff already in it, this does help with establishing your tank)

 

Adding tank water from an LFS will do nothing to help your tank - fresh salt water is better as there are less bad nutrients and the good nutrients are not depleted. In addition to this you don't know whether the LFS is adding copper to their tanks (some will not admit to it).

 

What you actually need is a good scoop of the junk in their sumps! This will give you a good seed of bacteria (they don't float free in the water).

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flatrabbit
you don't know whether the LFS is adding copper to their tanks (some will not admit to it).

 

Why would they do that?

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Sexy Shrimp
Why would they do that?

To kill parasites on fish

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revaltion131
Why would they do that?

 

As L3ANN3 said. Many places have separate water systems for their fish-only tanks and their reef/invert tanks. The "fish" water is treated with copper to help keep the fish happy. It's good to ask when you buy a fish or LR whether or not the water it is/was in was treated with copper. I include fish because we all can make mistakes if we float-acclimate and we might accidently put copper-treated water into our reef tanks.

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lakshwadeep
That's a good list but you forgot a major one.

 

Take all advice given by LFS employees with a large grain of salt. They have a financial interest in you and their advice can and will be heavily biased towards purchasing something from their store. Do your own research, most of the time you'll actually be more knowledgeable about the hobby than they are and you can find an answer and a solution to anything online if you know where to look and who to trust.

 

+1. It is better to not buy something that you weren't going to get than to waste money (and perhaps an animal's life) on something that the LFS said would be suitable/"reef-safe". Everyone may think that it's okay if some snails die from hermits, if a starter fish doesn't survive the cycle, or if tank water with Caulerpa is dumped into a storm drain. However, it is that kind of attitude that causes environmentalists and others to view our hobby as a threat and thus a cause for stricter collection regulations.

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JerseyChick

what does ro/di stand for?

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