Jump to content
halfpint

New people, READ ME!

Recommended Posts

MizTanks
don't do a water change during the cycle, and dont wash sponges under the tap, even if the diagram on the sponges packet looks so!

 

Why no wc during cycling?

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep
Why no wc during cycling?

 

Many people still support that (note the date of the post), but now the soft-cycling proponents have made this a serious debate.

Share this post


Link to post
MillerLite

Bump Bump

 

Just wanted to keep this rolling for all the beginners..lots of information, misinformation, and debate on everything from the adv and disadv. of skimmers, how often to feed fish, do we need to supplement, what kind of fish not to have, good bad and ugly about live rock, etc...

 

Please check this out..you might find answers to about 70% of your questions somewhere on these 12 pages :)

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

Some random suggestions:

 

If you have a question about water chemistry or algae problems, it's helpful to post your water parameters (i.e. test kit results). Just saying "my parameters are perfect" is not helpful if you're having a problem with those so-called perfect parameters.

 

Also, if you previously had PC or other low to medium lighting for your corals and have since upgraded your lights to MH (metal halide), T5HO fluorescent, or LEDs, then you have to acclimate the change in lighting. If you don't acclimate, some corals may bleach or even die. What you must change is the intensity of the light (i.e. having lights on for a shorter time is not going to affect intensity). Two options:

using layers of mesh/screen to partially block some light and remove one layer at a time

if the light can be raised, then keep it high at first and gradually lower it.

Edited by lakshwadeep

Share this post


Link to post
igottapi4

DON'T buy books, go to your library and check them out. After you find the one you like best then if you want buy it.

 

I spend a lot on a book and I really don’t like it and at the end I loved Saltwater Aquariums For Dummies and its only $15 on Amazon. SO don’t buy any book just because someone says it good, check them out yourself.

Edited by igottapi4

Share this post


Link to post
jadelee

Should check Amazon then to find what i want. Tnx for the idea! :)

Share this post


Link to post
crazy tarzan

as always, slow=good fast=problems.

 

Do you need a skimmer--no, will it help probably (I like to use them, but have gone without)

 

Live Rock--the 'fresher' it is the better, I personally like to grab it out of the shipping box the day it comes in. Still has more life than after sitting in a curing tank with no lights and mediocre circulation at the fish store for a month.

 

live rock can have hitch hikers--95% of which are great to have.

 

Let the tank sit for 2-3 months with just live rock and maybe a clean up crew--you'll be amazed at what you see--I once found a little 1/8" sea slug, black with white/blue markings. I was able to see him regularly until I added fish... But it will amaze you the life in the tank from just the rocks.

 

As was stated before, we usually overstock our tanks--this is where a skimmer can be helpful. And a refugium. Both allow you to better 'clean' the water.

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

Suggestions on water chemistry and dosing (addition of chemicals or other supplements affecting water chemistry):

 

The normal ranges for common water parameters (for a tropical reef tank) can be found here. If your tank's levels are in the normal ranges, don't try to go chasing after the "perfect" number.

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-05/rhf/index.php

 

The vast majority of supplements are either not helpful or are formulated with an aim to attract misinformed beginners (i.e. "accelerating" coralline growth or iodine for helping crustaceans molt). Likewise, tanks with a majority of soft and LPS (large polyp stony) corals should have no problems with water changes, which should always be your first "dosing" option. Thus, it pays to get a good salt and mix your own saltwater.

 

Don't dose what you are not accurately testing for. Accurately means you can trust your test kit. Research what type of product is most recommended for your application. Dose only as much as your tank is using, and check that other things won't be affected.

 

The link below is a good compilation of reef chemistry articles. It can be daunting, but understanding water chemistry is important to a successful tank.

http://archive.reefcentral.com/forums/show...ad.php?t=102605

 

 

EXTREMELY USEFUL BEGINNERS' GUIDE TO WATER CHEMISTRY

by Dr. Randy Holmes-Farley

Part 1: The Saltwater Itself

Part 2: What Chemicals Must be Supplemented

Part 3: pH

Part 4: What Chemicals May Detrimentally Accumulate

Edited by lakshwadeep

Share this post


Link to post
darren
Take your time, plan out every aspect of your system, and research everything thoroughly.

Share this post


Link to post
RyanR1212

^^ /agree

Share this post


Link to post
kiwicraig7

Hello everyone I'm new here and trying to find my way around when I found this thread. Figured it way a good place to start so sorry if I'm in the wrong place.

 

Hi I'm here to learn.

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

:welcome: to nano-reef.com

 

Search and read as much as you can first. If you can't find answers from searching, post a thread in this forum.

Share this post


Link to post
kiwicraig7

Some great tips that I need to and will use. I just purchased 28gal Nano and am in the process of setting it up. Definitely not as easy as I thought but I'm still excited so that good.

I have lots to learn.

Share this post


Link to post
burtbollinger

wildly random tidbits I wish people would have taught me:

 

- learn about the importance of alkalinity and calcium...especially alkalinity. visit bulkreefsupply and look into their two-part starter kit.

- buy a good salt mix and an ro/di unit, and begin making your own water

- go slow, and keep your hands out the the tank if possible

- avoid non-photosynthetic corals IMO

- avoid clams unless you have proper lighting, and an established tank.

- avoid gorgs, sea fans...and mandarins...

- even at 5-6 months, your tank is in its infancy...treat it carefully and be prepared for ugly algae blooms

- consider running a media reactor with carbon and GFO

- if you dont test it, do not does it...iodine, strontium....all that crap is a waste.

- ignore Ph....focus only on keeping a stable alk. Ph will take care of itself...

- dont buy things to make wife/kids happy....youre the expert, not them.

- magnesium helps keep alk. stable.

- Aim for a salinity @ 1.025

- damsels are mean....6-line wrasses can be mean, maroon clowns are mean

- peppermint shrimp may or may not be reef safe

- sally lightfoot crabs are not reef safe

- you need some sand stirring snails

- www.coralmorphologic.com

- www.bulkreefsupply.com

- www.reefbuilders.com

- don't take the LFS employee's word for anything

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Duckhams

+1 (all good advice! nice one burtbollinger)

 

Never buy on IMPULSE. Your tank WILL suffer for it 99% of the time. DO YOUR RESEARCH over and over again! Never take just one persons or websites advice, ask as many questions as possible!

 

Most importantly. Do NOT underestimate the power of the darkside!

Share this post


Link to post
BLoCkCliMbeR
wildly random tidbits I wish people would have taught me:

 

- learn about the importance of alkalinity and calcium...especially alkalinity. visit bulkreefsupply and look into their two-part starter kit.

- buy a good salt mix and an ro/di unit, and begin making your own water

- go slow, and keep your hands out the the tank if possible

- avoid non-photosynthetic corals IMO

- avoid clams unless you have proper lighting, and an established tank.

- avoid gorgs, sea fans...and mandarins...

- even at 5-6 months, your tank is in its infancy...treat it carefully and be prepared for ugly algae blooms

- consider running a media reactor with carbon and GFO

- if you dont test it, do not does it...iodine, strontium....all that crap is a waste.

- ignore Ph....focus only on keeping a stable alk. Ph will take care of itself...

- dont buy things to make wife/kids happy....youre the expert, not them.

- magnesium helps keep alk. stable.

- Aim for a salinity @ 1.025

- damsels are mean....6-line wrasses can be mean, maroon clowns are mean

- peppermint shrimp may or may not be reef safe

- sally lightfoot crabs are not reef safe

- you need some sand stirring snails

- www.coralmorphologic.com

- www.bulkreefsupply.com

- www.reefbuilders.com

- don't take the LFS employee's word for anything

 

if your not a paitent person, stick to freshwater....

Share this post


Link to post
rizakaniza

You forgot to add:

 

Keep some benadryl in your bathroom cabinet in case you get a rash from having your hands in the tank too much...

 

(This happened to me yesterday...don't know what it was, but I had a rash goin' on...the benadryl worked though)

Share this post


Link to post
Tyrsdottir
-- peppermint shrimp may or may not be reef safe

 

In my experience, they are "reef safe" until they've eaten all your aptasia.

Then they look for other similar stuff to consume voraciously.

Share this post


Link to post
happyfishman

It is important to take notes on the water clarity on a daily basis. However, this is not enough. I will advice that you test the water for PH, ammonia, salinity, or other tests every week as well.

Weekly or perhaps monthly water changes are crucial in any aquarium.

Share this post


Link to post
peasofme

all animals you get should be similar in size to avoid fighting. lawnmower blennies are hard to keep and also aggressive. most crabs including hermits will kill anything they can get their hands on. i hear red leg and scarlets are the exception. damsels are aggressive. if you want a blenny, the smaller the better. ones shaped like lawnmowers with the huge heads and thick bodies are much more aggressive than ones shaped like the bicolor or tailspot. personality > color. always ask the lfs to feed the animal in front of you whatever you will be feeding it. animals that eat pellets will usually eat anything. make sure they love the food they're eating, not spitting it out or just pecking at it. small, peaceful, easy fish to start with. gobies are good starters except the sand sifters. most fish will not get along with fish that look similar to it. don't get two of the same fish for this reason or two of the same species. ie, don't get two blennies. shrimp are delicate. zoas and mushrooms are easy. use egg crate to cover your tank from fish jumping out. you can use dead sand or rock and seed it with live sand/rock. everything should be quarantined for 2 months to be absolutely sure. diseases can travel on anything including sand/rocks. the only way to get rid of ich in your tank is for it to be fishless for 2 months. once you have ich you've already lost the battle. the best course of action then is to quarantine your fish. things reported to be reef safe or peaceful usually aren't. a mantis shrimp is not a pest. give it to one of the many people who would love to take care of it. same with any hitchhiker you don't want. whenever you don't want something, take it back to the lfs. never buy an animal to take care of a problem. unless maybe a snail. don't get a dragonet.

Edited by peasofme

Share this post


Link to post
hahaximmaxfish
spend lots of money

 

You bet! Theres not enough money in the world for this hobby...

Share this post


Link to post
cheryl jordan

1.Always have mixed salt water ready to go at least 20% for your tank volume.

2.Turn off the electricity when working with your tank especially during water changes, heaters tend to crack and burn when left on during water changes.

3.Remember to turn everything back on and open all valves as appropriate.

4.Enjoy hitch-hikers they are not all bad, bristle worms are good.

5.Try to keep you hands out of your tank, I know it takes control.

6.Check the stability of your stand occassionally.

7.Alway have towels ready and handy when doing a water change.

8.Do not answer the phone when doing a water change as this almost always ends up with a flood.

9.If you hear a noise from your tank in the middle of the night thats unusual, get oob and look.

10.If a fish is listed as a jumper and you put it in an uncovered tank and can't find it the next am look on the floor.

11. And finally do water changes, commit to do them, or do not get a tank.

12. Oh yea, pipe fish, sea fans, scallops, morish idols, basket stars, nautiluses, jelly fish, sun corals, carnation corals, will never survive unless you are either a public aquarium or an advanced hobbiest, so please leave them in the ocean where at least they have a chance.

Share this post


Link to post
chrisinmd
10.If a fish is listed as a jumper and you put it in an uncovered tank and can't find it the next am look on the floor.

 

lol :lol: thats if your cat didnt eat it

Share this post


Link to post
evanj

this thread was very helpful

 

Towelie.jpg

 

I like to always have towel near by, it might just be because I'm still aquascaping and adjusting things a lot, but I think it's solid advice. It always sucks to pull a wet hand out and have nowhere but the shirt to go..

Edited by evanj

Share this post


Link to post
kiwicraig7
wildly random tidbits I wish people would have taught me:

 

- learn about the importance of alkalinity and calcium...especially alkalinity. visit bulkreefsupply and look into their two-part starter kit.

- buy a good salt mix and an ro/di unit, and begin making your own water

- go slow, and keep your hands out the the tank if possible

- avoid non-photosynthetic corals IMO

- avoid clams unless you have proper lighting, and an established tank.

- avoid gorgs, sea fans...and mandarins...

- even at 5-6 months, your tank is in its infancy...treat it carefully and be prepared for ugly algae blooms

- consider running a media reactor with carbon and GFO

- if you dont test it, do not does it...iodine, strontium....all that crap is a waste.

- ignore Ph....focus only on keeping a stable alk. Ph will take care of itself...

- dont buy things to make wife/kids happy....youre the expert, not them.

- magnesium helps keep alk. stable.

- Aim for a salinity @ 1.025

- damsels are mean....6-line wrasses can be mean, maroon clowns are mean

- peppermint shrimp may or may not be reef safe

- sally lightfoot crabs are not reef safe

- you need some sand stirring snails

- www.coralmorphologic.com

- www.bulkreefsupply.com

- www.reefbuilders.com

- don't take the LFS employee's word for anything

Thanks for those tidbits I have noted them cause I know I will need them in the near future.

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...