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Sctn4Elk
what does ro/di stand for?

 

Really?? Reverse Osmosis DeIonized or basically 0 TDS (Total Dissolved Solids)

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orb4me

I think Im in the right topic. Ive had FW for some time now, and Ive decided I was a small SW, 2 Nemos and annomie (cant sp it yet) and some live rock. 20 gal is about as big as I can go. I have 4 FW tanks and no more room, as it is, this tank will have to go in the kitchen:) I have one corner left.

 

I dont know anything about SW tanks. Is a small tank called a nano tank? or is a nano something totally diff?

I dont want a bunch of expensive stuff and equipment, I hope this can be done with some pretty basic stuff.

Can a tall tank be used so I have more water? or am I headed or trouble right off the bat?

Distilled water ok for top offs?

Carb sand and rock?

Over the side filter?

mandatory to have a skimmer?

 

 

humm, I think thats it for starters. This site looks very nice. Hello everyone.

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Laura6686
what does ro/di stand for?

 

 

Hey Jersey Chick why did you change your logo? I thought it was great

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lakshwadeep
I think Im in the right topic. Ive had FW for some time now, and Ive decided I was a small SW, 2 Nemos and annomie (cant sp it yet) and some live rock. 20 gal is about as big as I can go. I have 4 FW tanks and no more room, as it is, this tank will have to go in the kitchen:) I have one corner left.

 

I dont know anything about SW tanks. Is a small tank called a nano tank? or is a nano something totally diff?

I dont want a bunch of expensive stuff and equipment, I hope this can be done with some pretty basic stuff.

Can a tall tank be used so I have more water? or am I headed or trouble right off the bat?

Distilled water ok for top offs?

Carb sand and rock?

Over the side filter?

mandatory to have a skimmer?

 

 

humm, I think thats it for starters. This site looks very nice. Hello everyone.

 

:welcome: to nano-reef.com

 

This thread is mainly for lists of advice (and some ranting) from members. Most of the older and more experienced members rarely check this thread, and your questions are best answered by creating a "new topic" in the beginners forum. Most of the answers to your questions can be found here (start with reading all the "beginners" articles and the glossary):

http://www.nano-reef.com/info/

 

This article has been useful to help explain freshwater and saltwater differences (including the wide range of costs). Please keep in mind that a marine tank is expensive, and can be more expensive if you try and cut too many corners when starting. It may contain some out of date equipment:

http://www.fishlore.com/saltwatervsfreshwater.htm

 

Also, I must advise that while keeping clownfish ("Nemos") is a relatively easy task, keeping suitable anemone hosts requires an established tank and good water/lighting conditions. Remember that wild anemone populations take a long time (they can live for decades) to recover from harvesting, and they should only be introduced when your tank is stable. Clownfish do not require anemones to survive, and many will take alternate hosts such as torch or frogspawn coral.

 

Since you're placing the tank in a kitchen, remember to consider excess heat sources since saltwater tanks rely on a stable temperature of around 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

I'll answer your questions here this time, but remember to make a new thread to get more answers and ask other questions.

 

I dont know anything about SW tanks. Is a small tank called a nano tank? or is a nano something totally diff?

Nano tanks are generally less than 30 gallons. A subset is the pico reefs, which are around 5 gallons or less and definitely need a lot of dedication and limited livestock. Reef tanks are setup to keep sessile (non-moving) invertebrates like corals and clams. Easier setups include FOWLR (fish only with live rock).

 

I dont want a bunch of expensive stuff and equipment, I hope this can be done with some pretty basic stuff.

Once again, try to think about costs in the long-run. Lighting can be the most expensive equipment, but it will make difference in what, if any, types of corals/clams/anemones you can keep. You can keep things simple by doing DIY work.

 

Can a tall tank be used so I have more water? or am I headed or trouble right off the bat?

Tall tanks are less favorable than long tanks because of decreased light penetration (especially for fluorescent lighting). It is helpful to start with a large and long tank (the "breeder" sizes).

 

Distilled water ok for top offs?

Distilled is good; RO/DI (reverse osmosis deionized) is better. Avoid tap water because of the, usually, insufficient treatment and filtration.

 

Carb sand and rock?

A good sand choice is aragonite (or calcite). Don't get "aquarium gravel" or things used for freshwater. Live rock is the foundation of your filtration; get at least 1-1.5 pounds per gallon.

 

Over the side filter?

External filters full of bio-media quickly become nitrate factories because of clogging and detritus. Most people don't use them for actual filtration; some place chemical media like phosphate absorbers.

 

mandatory to have a skimmer?

Not really, except if you are going to have a predator tank or SPS tank. Skimmers have their benefits, but you must stick with the regular weekly water changes if you're not having a skimmer.

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johnmaloney

Rule of thumbs are garbage. Never use them.

 

For example: 1 cleaner per gallon. You can't fit 10 fighting conchs in a 10 gallon. 10 really small cleaners won't do the trick. Know the species, their capabilities and there requirements.

 

The 1 inch of fish per gallon rule is the dumbest thing ever created.

 

Maybe you can use them for lighting....maybe. But even then light intensity is not measured in watts, it is measured in lumens. Watts refers to amount of electricity consumed. Efficient bulbs sometimes produce twice as many lumens as some metal halides. A 20 watt bulb with 800 lumens, gives off the same light as a 40 watt bulb with 800 lumens. So....

 

Pay no attention to rules of thumb, and spend the time to ask the questions. (But never ask your LFS, they will tell you crazy things like that scooter blenny would be a great fish for a new tank).

Edited by johnmaloney

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Irushin

Teach your cleaner shrimp tricks like rolling over and dying from an overdose of prime. :o

 

Make sure you have your tanks covered for extended power outages with things like generators, battery operated air pumps and extra water. Hurricane season.

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yankeereefer

not sure if this is already listed. 10 page thread is a lot to read when I'm supposed to be working.

 

Put your ATO on a timer so that it only runs a few minutes at a couple times a day.

 

Yesterday, My RO reservoir got low and the pump was sucking some air. My GF came home and called me to ask is she should add more RO. I told her yes. When She pulled the reservoir out to fill, she accidentally dislodged the the RO feed tubing from the sump.

 

She filled the reservoir and walked away, minutes later she heard the pump sucking air again and found the reservoir empty again. Called me back to ask if it should take that much water - I asked, Is the carpet wet? Yepper - Said to pull the plug b/c explaining everything to look for would take too much time. Luckily I was already on my way home and less than 30 minutes away.

 

Floor was wet - Not bad though, my ATO reservoir is only 2g

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UWW

so your saying just get a pump and have it pump for a few minutes regularly? That sure would be a nice and cheap/simple ATO, what pump would I use? Also what kind of timer allows you to do only minutes? Do I need a real nice one?

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lakshwadeep
so your saying just get a pump and have it pump for a few minutes regularly? That sure would be a nice and cheap/simple ATO, what pump would I use? Also what kind of timer allows you to do only minutes? Do I need a real nice one?

 

No, this is if you already have an ATO set up. Ideally, the ATO should pump water when the water line gets to a certain level and stop when it gets to another level. However, there is a chance, as yankeereefer stated, that the pump will not turn off and instead will pump all the water (lowering salinity drastically). Since ATOs don't take too long to replace evaporated water, it is a good precaution to make sure the pump can turn on (using a timer) for only a short time every day.

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yankeereefer

Exactly

 

My ATO consists of a relay, float switch and a pump (with necessary AC adapters) - See aquahub.com -

Find a digital timer at Lowes/HD, etc. These are capable of having multiple daily settings in increments of 1 min

 

YR

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thetaylors

Great information, thanks to everyone who posted..

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d0ughb0y
Exactly

 

My ATO consists of a relay, float switch and a pump (with necessary AC adapters) - See aquahub.com -

Find a digital timer at Lowes/HD, etc. These are capable of having multiple daily settings in increments of 1 min

 

YR

 

FYI, this timer frequently goes on sale for $7. I got like 4 of these and the great thing with them is they do not lose the programming even when you unplug them! unlike thise mechanical timers on 15 minute increments that stops working when you unplug.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/disp...temnumber=95205

 

it is exactly the same thing as this one

http://www.marinedepot.com/ps_ViewItem~Sea...6vendor%3d.html

 

funny how the same item becomes more expensive if it is sold to reefers. sort of like the price of a shirt becomes more expensive if sold as a golf shirt.

Edited by d0ughb0y

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bagoegg

Being a noob, my advice is to just search. I see way too many noobs posting with questions that have been answered 500 times. The search feature is great on this site and you can even search within posts. This is great on someone tank log because you can easily jump to the page where they talk about the exact same problem your having.

 

Also read through the tank logs. Steelhlr's is where I started and read that for a week straight, over and over and over until I felt I had a grasp on a sw tank. Reading the tank logs is also a great way to get ideas on rock placements and equipment, especially if you have a AIO and need to know how to turn this in to that or fit this in that chamber.

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bodiam

Would anyone know of a Mac version of a log program to keep track of their parameters?

Thanks

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Sexy Shrimp

Its call Maquarium and is free :) just search the apple downloads website...

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bodiam

Thanks, this program will work. Appreciate the help.

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Irushin

No Pistol shrimp !

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lakshwadeep
No Pistol shrimp !

 

That's a misleading statement. Pistol shrimp are in general harmless.

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fish_chips
have a stable income

 

+1

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lakshwadeep

These articles on common myths should be read by every reefkeeper, beginner or advanced. Some are just nitpicking or focused on large tanks, but others, like proper cycling, have big implications for success:

 

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-11/eb/index.php

Part one:

Myth 1: Aquarium organisms are often correctly identified and sold by their correct species.

Myth 2: Aquarists commonly keep zooanthids.

Myth 3: Corals do not need to be fed. They get all they need from light.

Myth 4: SPS corals have requirements that include high light and water flow.

Myth 5: The "K" rating of aquarium lamps plays an important role in the coloration of corals.


Myth 6: Corals are colorful because of their symbiotic zooxanthellae.

 

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-12/eb/index.php

Myth 7: Hairy crabs are bad (can eat corals, etc.) and should be removed.

Myth 8: The statement, "but my water quality checks out fine."

Myth 9: Lugol's dips or other commercial dips are useful or prophylactic for treating coral ailments. 
Myth 10: Bacterial infections are common in aquarium corals.

Myth 11: Brown jelly is caused by the protozoan, Helicostoma nonatum.

Myth 12: Aquariums need supplements from the fish store.

Myth 13: The refugium concept.

 

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-01/eb/index.php

Myth 14: Microbubbles are to be avoided.

Myth 15: Concepts about Nitrification, Stocking Orders, and the New Tank

Myth 17: You can never skim a tank too much.

Myth 18: My aquarium is a reef-crest type tank.

Myth 19: To propagate corals, one should break or cut off a branch or section, and then apply glue or affix the broken fragment to new substrate.

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hazmat
These articles on common myths should be read by every reefkeeper, beginner or advanced. Some are just nitpicking or focused on large tanks, but others, like proper cycling, have big implications for success:

 

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-11/eb/index.php

Part one:

Myth 1: Aquarium organisms are often correctly identified and sold by their correct species.

Myth 2: Aquarists commonly keep zooanthids.

Myth 3: Corals do not need to be fed. They get all they need from light.

Myth 4: SPS corals have requirements that include high light and water flow.

Myth 5: The "K" rating of aquarium lamps plays an important role in the coloration of corals.


Myth 6: Corals are colorful because of their symbiotic zooxanthellae.

 

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-12/eb/index.php

Myth 7: Hairy crabs are bad (can eat corals, etc.) and should be removed.

Myth 8: The statement, "but my water quality checks out fine."

Myth 9: Lugol's dips or other commercial dips are useful or prophylactic for treating coral ailments. 
Myth 10: Bacterial infections are common in aquarium corals.

Myth 11: Brown jelly is caused by the protozoan, Helicostoma nonatum.

Myth 12: Aquariums need supplements from the fish store.

Myth 13: The refugium concept.

 

http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-01/eb/index.php

Myth 14: Microbubbles are to be avoided.

Myth 15: Concepts about Nitrification, Stocking Orders, and the New Tank

Myth 17: You can never skim a tank too much.

Myth 18: My aquarium is a reef-crest type tank.

Myth 19: To propagate corals, one should break or cut off a branch or section, and then apply glue or affix the broken fragment to new substrate.

 

Laks-you are such a wealth of information!! This was really interesting and informative reading.

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lakshwadeep

Thanks, I'm trying to give back as much help as I've received over the years before going back to school. Another tip:

 

When doing a google search, add the terms "reefkeeping", "advanced aquarist", or "wet web media". You never know when one of those online magazines (or encyclopedia for wet web media) has a good article or FAQs on the subject.

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DangerousHours

Hello all.

 

 

I've been reading these forums for a while and I am ridiculously new to all of this. And some of these acronyms throw my off as I am unfamiliar with them, so would someone be so kind and tell me what they mean? :)

 

ATO, CUC....?

 

There are some others but those two come to mind. I catch on to things pretty fast so I won't be bothering you too long ;) Thanks

Edited by DangerousHours

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CollegeNano
Hello all.

 

 

I've been reading these forums for a while and I am ridiculously new to all of this. And some of these acronyms throw my off as I am unfamiliar with them, so would someone be so kind and tell me what they mean? :)

 

ATO, CUC....?

 

There are some others but those two come to mind. I catch on to things pretty fast so I won't be bothering you too long ;) Thanks

 

ATO = auto top off, this is a device you can buy or DIY (do it yourself). It makes sure as your tank evaporates the fresh water is replaced, keeping the salinity constant

 

CUC = clean up crew. This consists of livestock that keeps up with tank maintenance. The most popular in this group are snails and hermit crabs.

 

Good luck!

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lakshwadeep

If you click the information tab at the top left of this page, you will see a helpful glossary. Some terms maybe just too new or actually not reef-related.

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