Jump to content
halfpint

New people, READ ME!

Recommended Posts

lakshwadeep

Debonator: please make a separate thread (click the "new topic" icon at the top of this page) so that your questions can be answered in one place and in greater detail. This thread is more for people giving generalized advice rather than a question-and-answer format.

 

As for your question, fishfreak218 had a bad experience with grammas, but that is more of an anecdote than a strict rule. Note that grammas (family Grammatidae) are related to but not exactly dottybacks (family Pseudochromidae), which often earn their aggressive reputation.

Share this post


Link to post
The Debonator
Debonator: please make a separate thread (click the "new topic" icon at the top of this page) so that your questions can be answered in one place and in greater detail. This thread is more for people giving generalized advice rather than a question-and-answer format.

 

Oops, sorry. I finally sifted through all 14 pages and a lot helped, and some was confusing.

Share this post


Link to post
blondesplash
The search button is good, but in addition, I also use google search for more info. Also read as much as you can. I'm not very technical oriented and I like to keep things as simple as possible. One book that I enjoyed reading was The Nano-Reef Handbook by Chris Brightwell. Lots of great pics, (alright I admit I liked the pictures), and has a lot of info.

 

One more thing, be very Patient and take your time. For example, don't decide to put in a BTA for your clownfish after the tank has been up a few weeks. ;)

 

Hi

Very new to this so just reading through suggestions!! please can you tell me what BTA stands for? Thanks Natalie

Share this post


Link to post
Reefmonster
Hi

...please can you tell me what BTA stands for? Thanks Natalie

BTA stands for Bubble Tip Anemone.

 

@lakshwadeep I have had many Dottybacks over the years...But in all fairness I should have also said that the dottybacks that I have had have all been the smallest fish in the tank. They are aggressive, and will fight with other fish in an aquarium that doesn't have enough food in it. A veggie clip with some nori in it will help, as most fish are omnivorous.and would rather forage throughout the day.

 

At those New to reef-keeping... Water quality is king...make frequent water changes and make sure to use RODI water for top-off, (the freshwater will evaporate and needs to be refilled / replenished daily). I do a small saltwater change everyday when I do my maintenance...takes me about 10 minutes and my fish / corals love me for it. I use Troic Marin salt and basically all I do is;

 

1. Take 2 empty 16oz cups,

2. fill one with the new saltwater

3. Dip the other cup in to remove 16oz

4. Carefully pour the new saltwater into the tank

5. I do this after I have scrubbed the glass, and or stirred the sand.

 

That's it!

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

The true answer to nearly every reefkeeping question is, "It depends" because often there isn't enough information to give a good answer or even and educated guess.

 

So, it's very useful to give as much info as you can about your system when asking a question. This includes, but is not limited to:

 

equipment

-tank size at the very least

-stock or modified equipment if it is an "all-in-one" tank

-include filtration sources (both live rock and external filters)

-lighting brand/model/bulbs when asking about photosynthetic corals/algae

 

water parameters

-probably the worst thing you could do is to say your parameters are "perfect/good"

-include the units, like ppm or dKH, except for pH and brands/models of the testing equipment

-if the question is about a change in water quality, it's good to provide data on what happened before and after the incident

 

complete livestock list

-at least everything you purchased but also "significant hitchhikers" like crabs, corals, anemones etc.

-try to find the taxonomic name of at least the animals: invertebrates will be fine with either the family or genus name; fish should be identified down to the species

 

pictures

-often the most important part of identifications; although, blurry/dark pictures are often useless

-a full tank shot (FTS) can sometimes help others point out things that were overlooked (like problems with the current equipment/livestock)

Share this post


Link to post
ericchris
Things I have found.

 

~Don’t buy salt just because it dissolves instantly. Your best bet is to mix it and keep it agitated over night before doing a water change anyway.

 

~Know your coral/fish before you buy it. This will keep you from being harassed when you ask for an ID on something that doesn’t belong in a nano.

 

~Yes anemones can thrive in a nano with proper lighting. I listened to the lfs that said my sebae would stay small. I didn’t do the above suggestion and now it sits in front of my tank against the glass. (When I look at my fish tank I get a good view of a sebae’s a$$)

 

~If your anemone is white it’s beautiful but not typically healthy. It’s bleached and needs some TLC. Also never put an anemone in a tank you wouldn’t consider matured and stable.

 

~When buying lights for your tank spend the cash and do it right the first time.

 

~Buy a tank that’s a little bigger that you think you want. I never hear anyone saying “I wish I bought the smaller tank"

so what color should it be, im tring to do the right thing need a little help on this one...

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

Anemones that are photosynthetic have symbiotic zooxanthellae algae, just like photosynthetic corals. These are yellow-brown in color, so healthy anemones with enough of the the zooxanthellae should be a tan color (in addition to the other pigments). Bleaching, which also occurs in corals, happens when the zooxanthellae are expelled, usually during high stress. A bleached anemone may not be white per se but clear.

 

It's a good idea to make a separate thread (click "new topic") in this forum so you can get tailored answers because there are many factors that go into why an anemone would be bleached. Also, try to make only one thread to keep replies coordinated.

Share this post


Link to post
skeeters

Best advice I can give.

 

reefcleaners.org

mediabaskets.com

mrcoral.com

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
StevieT

Ok, I see this every day and I don't know where it comes from. There are so many posts talking against this yet it still is a "mod" that n00bs do all the time.

 

Sample post:

 

T H E - M O D S

 

2: Remove the bioballs and replace with LR and remove the sponge

3: Replace the return pump (recomened a brand you used on your OBC8 that worked well wink.gif

4: Switch the lights around to assist in temperature control ( I heard switching the lights helps keep it cooler)

 

No

 

Bioballs and live rock (LR) rubble are the exact same thing. They both can cause the same problems and they pose no benefit to your tank. I would love to know how 1/2 pound of rubble will help 8-35 gallons of water.

 

The live rock in your display is your bio-filter.

 

He has the sponge part correct.

Edited by StevieT

Share this post


Link to post
ehwood
I'm a nooby so you got me. Whats a BTA?

This raises an important point - if you're going to do a newbie thread, don't use so much jargon without explaining it at least once along the way. I'm still scratching my head over much of it.

Share this post


Link to post
ehwood
near the front door for feng shui principles.

Feng shui is bunk...

Share this post


Link to post
ehwood
1. When you can, sent up a quarentene tank. I wish I would have. Learn that QT means quarintene tank because its difficult to spell!

There is nothing difficult about spelling "quarantine". Not to be mean, but it's easy to look words up online that you aren't sure about. Headaches avoided.

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

This thread is meant for posting advice, not nitpicking years-old posts with personal opinions. There is a useful glossary in the library section (top left of page).

Share this post


Link to post
ehwood
everything should be quarantined for 2 months to be absolutely sure.
Sounds excessive.
a mantis shrimp is not a pest. give it to one of the many people who would love to take care of it. same with any hitchhiker you don't want.

That's right! Send it my way. It can live in my new saltwater or, darn it, feed my crayfish if it does die.

Share this post


Link to post
Telekinesis

Form your own opinion on the knowledge given by LFS employees by doing research to compare with. For example, some of the best advice I've received has been from a few guys at my local (chain store) Jacks. Just because they work for a chain doesn't mean they're ignorant or will force BS on you to make a sale. There are some individuals working there who are intelligent, maintain their tanks well, and will give you the straight facts about what they do or don't know. I've had them place personal orders for me based purely on my interest in something and without requesting it, to boot.

 

This might not be the norm, but it's worth finding out for yourself before jumping to conclusions. I tend to see a lot of bashing going on regarding this subject, so that's my two cents on it.

Share this post


Link to post
nanobobsj
  • Find a mentor in this hobby and duplicate what's working for them. Thanks Fish and Jemram. :)

 

 

 

I like that idea.....

Share this post


Link to post
_Mitch_

Hello,

I thought this would be an appropriate place for my first post. I'm doing as much research as I can and will continue for the next few months before taking the plunge. This thread is very helpful... keep it coming guys!

Share this post


Link to post
DK_Reef

I would add three equipment categories

 

Good

Better

Best

Share this post


Link to post
Oasis
don't do a water change during the cycle, and dont wash sponges under the tap, even if the diagram on the sponges packet looks so!

 

Does it hurt to do water changes during the cycle or does it just make it take longer to cycle?

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep

The nitrogen cycle occurs constantly, but "the cycle" is usually when new live rock has a lot of die-off and a spike in ammonia production, which is an imbalance in the nitrogen cycle. So, the basic point is you don't need "the cycle" to have a successful tank; this is why people can transfer rocks from an established tank to another often with no ammonia spikes. Check the nitrogen cycle article (library section at the top left of this page > articles) for a good description of the nitrogen cycle.

 

Water changes are useful in reducing the severity of the ammonia spike, which would be important if there are delicate hitchhikers (like corals). This is sometimes called "soft cycling". Otherwise, water changes may not make a big difference (i.e. most of the hitchhikers will survive). That said, avoid waiting for a long time to start water changes; they can help cut down on algae blooms that often come after "the cycle". It's usually difficult to anticipate whether a cycle is long (or even what is the "normal" length) since it depends a lot on the rock.

 

Also, curing is basically pre-cycling rock before it gets into your tank; cured rock is pre-cycled rock.

Share this post


Link to post
TianTian

I'm a bit new but here's something I've learned pretty quick:

 

Don't let family/friends sway you into buying something for your tank or setting it up a certain way. It's your tank. Have fun with it! :)

Share this post


Link to post
junginit
Wait for two months or so after you decide you reeeeeeaaaalllly want a tank and see if you still do. While you are waiting, read and read forums like this and if the bug is still there it will be that much sweeter to set up your tank and you will have a lot fewer 'noob' questions or surprises B).

Good advice. What I did and I am really enjoy it!

Share this post


Link to post
bnm0003
THE MOST IMPORTAN RULE TO NANO REEF KEEPING:

Dont get a Royal Gramma!

 

Be gentle I've only been researching nano reefs since Monday.. Why not a Royal Gramma?

Share this post


Link to post
lakshwadeep
Be gentle I've only been researching nano reefs since Monday.. Why not a Royal Gramma?

 

It's one person's experience. Some, not all, owners of grammas have reported them being aggressive, which is a problem if you want shy/peaceful fish (like most nano reef fish).

Share this post


Link to post
rolinroc
Be Nice...

 

And dont Troll...or yu will catch a feeler hurter or 2

0.02

 

:haha:

 

Izzue

just buy some good rock get instant ocean salt and let the tank do its own work

 

 

all i did was get some good quality rock at petco about 15 pounds of it and reef crstals salt let the tank cycle and you got your aquarium just use a hydrometer to measure the salinity and evrything works out

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...