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seabass

100 gallons behind a wall

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I can see the uniseals failing over time. As far regular bulkheads, I'd tighten them, ensure they don't leak, and forget about them.

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I think they have a 25 year warranty. My bigger concern is that the hole is 2.32" and they recommend a 2.5" hole for the 1 1/2" UNISEAL. I don't really want to drill out the hole; I wonder if it will fit as is.

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I think they have a 25 year warranty. My bigger concern is that the hole is 2.32" and they recommend a 2.5" hole for the 1 1/2" UNISEAL. I don't really want to drill out the hole; I wonder if it will fit as is.

 

Just to be clear... You want to use uniseals instead of bulkheads on the overflow drain of your 100g tank? And your sure that is a good idea?

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Well... yeah... At least I did. I guess I still kind of, sort of do. IDK anymore.

 

Have you read about problems with these? I've used them on agriculture tanks from 50 to 150 gallons before, so I thought that it might be a viable solution. Should I be concerned? Are we talking About leaks or full out failures? Any links?

 

Edit:

I was thinking that the tank panels should be supported by the fame of the stand. Space isn't a concern, so I could extend the stand out a few inches if needed. Should I even be worried about the sides not being supported by the frame itself?

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IMO, you can't trust uniseals long term as a replacement bulkhead. They're fine for brute cans or any other non essential water storage.

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Nice to see this project moving. I don't know anything about uniseals, so no opinion there. Good luck!

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I was thinking that the tank panels should be supported by the fame of the stand. Space isn't a concern, so I could extend the stand out a few inches if needed. Should I even be worried about the sides not being supported by the frame itself?

Does the tank have a frame?

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I was referring to the stand's frame; the tank doesn't have a frame. So I'm wondering if it would be a problem if I extend the stand (so that the tank's side panels aren't directly under the stand's frame)?

 

Being an acrylic tank, the whole bottom is supported by cross bracing and a sheet of plywood over the top. I'm making a SketchUp drawing of a potential stand that might make it more clear.

 

 

 

I'm still wondering if there are known problems with UNISEAL bulkheads, or if the idea just seems like it would be more risky. :unsure:

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An acrylic tank with a flat topped stand, with cross bracing, I think would be fine with the top frame offset outward.

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Or am I better off trying to support the sides with a support?

stand1a.gif

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If I were you I'd have the support across the middle and all three smaller supports going all the way across, kinda like a combination of both designs.

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I decided to use the standard bulkheads (which I already have), and extend the stand 1" on each side. That will provide roughly 1/2" of support (by the frame), just under the 3/8" side panels. With the plywood, I think that this will be enough support while allowing me room to install and maintain the bulkheads.

 

I still haven't made up my mind about the cross supports, but I deal with that when I get there.

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I think thats a good call on all accounts. I think you'll want a couple of cross braces up top, just to help support the plywood.

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I would definitely use additional cross braces on the top that go all the way across. It's always better to overbuild. Although it is surprising how strong good lumber is. I built my 120 gallon stand with my gf carpenter uncle out of 3/4" high quality plywood and it is one hell of a strong stand. The entire thing is made out of the plywood no used two sheets and it is damn strong. I have a 120 DT and 40b sump.

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I agree, the cross braces are needed for an acrylic tank. The shorter width-wise braces help prevent the top frame from twisting as well as supporting the plywood top. Although I still like the idea of running one lengthwise to support the sides. Still deciding. I should probably stop obsessing about it and just build it; I'm sure it'll be fine.

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I should probably stop obsessing about it and just build it; I'm sure it'll be fine.

 

Yeah, we tend to grossly over build our stands.

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050713a.jpg
The wood is cut and the pocket holes are drilled.


050713b.jpg
Assembly begins...


050713c.jpg
I watched a couple Kreg Jig videos and determined that it was best to complete the sides first.


050713d.jpg

The frame is done; the plywood tops are next.

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Yeah, we tend to grossly over build our stands.

 

Told ya! Looks awesome. One of those Kreg pocket hole kits is at the top of my tools wish list. I will be getting one before my next stand build.

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Told ya! Looks awesome. One of those Kreg pocket hole kits is at the top of my tools wish list. I will be getting one before my next stand build.

Thanks! :)

 

Yeah, they are great for this kind of project. Their face clamp and right angle clamp really do help keep the joints lined up. A miter saw would be nice, but a circular saw and speed square work good enough for me.

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Thanks! :)

 

Yeah, they are great for this kind of project. Their face clamp and right angle clamp really do help keep the joints lined up. A miter saw would be nice, but a circular saw and speed square work good enough for me.

 

Now your speaking my language. Wife wanted me to turn our 42" open gothic style fence that I built when we moved into this house years ago into a 6' fence. I told her it would cost her a 12" miter saw and I built her a shadow box fence last spring.

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The wood is cut and the pocket holes are drilled.

 

 

Assembly begins...

 

 

I watched a couple Kreg Jig videos and determined that it was best to complete the sides first.

 

The frame is done; the plywood tops are next.

 

Seabass, your work is top notch!

 

Now your speaking my language. Wife wanted me to turn our 42" open gothic style fence that I built when we moved into this house years ago into a 6' fence. I told her it would cost her a 12" miter saw and I built her a shadow box fence last spring.

 

Mstefa1, I think your requests are fair! My husband gets a new tool for every DIY project as a fee also. I got him a new large wet tile saw when we tiled the floor before setting up the 125 g tank. :)

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After soaking overnight:

051413a.jpg

 

Phosphate from water prior to adding rocks: 0.00ppm
Phosphate from rocks soaking overnight: 0.10ppm

 

I've learned that the test results are not accurate when testing RO/DI water. So it would have been better to have soaked it in saltwater overnight (and then compare the before and after phosphate readings).

 

But since my readings show a relatively higher phosphate reading, and the water became discolored after soaking overnight, I have decided that I will indeed strip the dry rock prior to using it.

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