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Clam in my 10 gallon strategy


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#1
Disturbed22

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I know this isnt my first thread asking about clams but I am very determined to keep one. Preferably a crocea I know they require alot of light and my angler shouldnt be exposed to alot of light I heard so will this be a problem?


Besides this ^^^^^ possible problem this is what I would do to keep a clam.


I have a MP10, RKL ( so its always 77 degrees ) , a AC50 ( with mechanical filtration, chemipure elite, and that other stuff that comes in AC filteres) a AC70 ( modded to a fuge with cheato ).

My way of keeping a clam would be to do 10-20% water changes every 2 days. I use reef crystals salt and I know this is a good salt to begin with so will that be enough to keep a happy clam?


Thanks for putting up with me.

#2
Disturbed22

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You guys cant be sick of me already ;)

#3
Disturbed22

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really, no one :o

#4
patback

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10 or 20 percent changes every 2 days? You will end up serving your clam on a half shell from how tired you woul get of it by the end of the month. Start off with a derasa. Ive always done About 30-50 ish percent changes, and my clam is fine with no dosing.

#5
Disturbed22

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10 or 20 percent changes every 2 days? You will end up serving your clam on a half shell from how tired you woul get of it by the end of the month. Start off with a derasa. Ive always done About 30-50 ish percent changes, and my clam is fine with no dosing.



dont they get huge? I was thinkin crocea or maxima

#6
patback

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Technically they all get huge. Maximas are known to get to 16 inches, according to many many " reputable sources. They just forget to tell you that this is an anomaly, and most stay much much smaller. Expect a derasa to get maybe 2 inches bigger than a typical maxima at the most.

#7
Disturbed22

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Technically they all get huge. Maximas are known to get to 16 inches, according to many many " reputable sources. They just forget to tell you that this is an anomaly, and most stay much much smaller. Expect a derasa to get maybe 2 inches bigger than a typical maxima at the most.


So a derasa is probably the best for beginners right?

#8
patback

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So a derasa is probably the best for beginners right?

In my opinion, yes. ( I originally wanted either a crocea or maxima also). But it's just my opinion. Derasa are much more forgiving than te other giant clams. Just read up on whatever species you decide on extensively before your purchase, and try to seen if others here agree or not with my statements( not a lot of answers, huh). I am also new to clam keeping.

#9
Disturbed22

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In my opinion, yes. ( I originally wanted either a crocea or maxima also). But it's just my opinion. Derasa are much more forgiving than te other giant clams. Just read up on whatever species you decide on extensively before your purchase, and try to seen if others here agree or not with my statements( not a lot of answers, huh). I am also new to clam keeping.


well if anyone has any other input that would be much appreciated

#10
koensayr

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Crocea is the slowest grower and is much smaller than a Maxima at max size.

But since I have only had one clam (Crocea), I cannot comment on their relative ease of care.

#11
metrokat

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Was wondering why you think a WC every 2 days is needed to keep a clam happy? If anything they feed off the nutrients in the water so if you are changing out the water every 2 days you're almost manually skimming the good stuff away.

Click the Icons for links

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#12
Disturbed22

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Was wondering why you think a WC every 2 days is needed to keep a clam happy? If anything they feed off the nutrients in the water so if you are changing out the water every 2 days you're almost manually skimming the good stuff away.



Because everyone makes it sound so hard to keep one.

#13
pico-reefer

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Was wondering why you think a WC every 2 days is needed to keep a clam happy? If anything they feed off the nutrients in the water so if you are changing out the water every 2 days you're almost manually skimming the good stuff away.



most likely to replace the calcium the clams suck up.

#14
Disturbed22

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most likely to replace the calcium the clams suck up.


So if I got a Kalkwasser Reactor and a calcium reactor Id be good?

#15
pico-reefer

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So if I got a Kalkwasser Reactor and a calcium reactor Id be good?



i'm by no means an expert, but I have seen a few sps nano's were they only use kalkwasser in their top off water, so it might work, testing will be the only sure fire way to see.

#16
Catch22

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Don't over think this.... just pull the trigger. If you notice it's not going to work take the little guy back and buy you a fish!

#17
metrokat

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You would get more information on google or the clam section on this forum.

In the home aquarium, Crocea Clams require intense lighting to thrive as they contain the symbiotic algae called zooxanthellae, and receive the majority of their nutrition from the light through photosynthesis. Smaller T. crocea that are 2" or less in size are much more sensitive to very intense lighting as their membrane is much thinner than larger specimens. For this reason, care should be taken to properly photo-adapt them to the existing reef aquarium lighting in a similar manner to newly introduced stony and soft corals. When adapting a new Crocea Clam to very intense lighting, it is ideal to set them on a small rock or in a plastic dish with coarse substrate at the bottom of the aquarium. Over time, the clam can then be slowly moved up higher in the aquarium.

Tridacna clams are also filter feeders and constantly filter the water for small particulates. Crocea Clams larger than 2" do not require supplemental feedings, but smaller T. crocea that are less than 2" should be fed a phytoplankton or greenwater supplement several times per week if maintained in a nutrient poor reef aquarium.

Looking for the best food to feed your Tridacna Clams? We recommend AlgaGen Acartia tonsa, AlgaGen Pseudodiaptomus pelagicus, AlgaGen Parvocalanus crassirostris, AlgaGen Tangerine Pod, AlgaGen Moina salina, AlgaGen PhycoPure™ Reef Blend, AlgaGen Decap'd Brine™, and AlgaGen Rotifers.

Tridacna crocea are relatively hardy clams, and require intense lighting and good water flow in the home aquarium. Proper water chemistry is very important, and they will thrive when calcium levels of 380- 450 mg/L, alkalinity level of 8-11 dKH, and magnesium level of 1280-1350 ppm are maintained.

Click the Icons for links

Kats.png max.png TOTM.png featuredRB.png NLOGO.jpg MDfish_White_Background_copy_bigger.jpg JBJ-Cubey-3-Gallon-Desktop-Aquarium-Blac


#18
metrokat

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You would get more information on google or the clam section on this forum.

In the home aquarium, Crocea Clams require intense lighting to thrive as they contain the symbiotic algae called zooxanthellae, and receive the majority of their nutrition from the light through photosynthesis. Smaller T. crocea that are 2" or less in size are much more sensitive to very intense lighting as their membrane is much thinner than larger specimens. For this reason, care should be taken to properly photo-adapt them to the existing reef aquarium lighting in a similar manner to newly introduced stony and soft corals. When adapting a new Crocea Clam to very intense lighting, it is ideal to set them on a small rock or in a plastic dish with coarse substrate at the bottom of the aquarium. Over time, the clam can then be slowly moved up higher in the aquarium.

Tridacna clams are also filter feeders and constantly filter the water for small particulates. Crocea Clams larger than 2" do not require supplemental feedings, but smaller T. crocea that are less than 2" should be fed a phytoplankton or greenwater supplement several times per week if maintained in a nutrient poor reef aquarium.

Looking for the best food to feed your Tridacna Clams? We recommend AlgaGen Acartia tonsa, AlgaGen Pseudodiaptomus pelagicus, AlgaGen Parvocalanus crassirostris, AlgaGen Tangerine Pod, AlgaGen Moina salina, AlgaGen PhycoPure™ Reef Blend, AlgaGen Decap'd Brine™, and AlgaGen Rotifers.

Tridacna crocea are relatively hardy clams, and require intense lighting and good water flow in the home aquarium. Proper water chemistry is very important, and they will thrive when calcium levels of 380- 450 mg/L, alkalinity level of 8-11 dKH, and magnesium level of 1280-1350 ppm are maintained.

Click the Icons for links

Kats.png max.png TOTM.png featuredRB.png NLOGO.jpg MDfish_White_Background_copy_bigger.jpg JBJ-Cubey-3-Gallon-Desktop-Aquarium-Blac


#19
Seamonkey84

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As far as long term, it wouldn't work out very well, but while it's still a manageable size you could do it as long as you can keep perameters stable (dont waste salt, dose and test, eventually may need a calcium reactor or drip system tk keep up with needs as they suck it up like a sponge in so little water). What kind of lighting do you have? spot lighting with a par30 could be used while keeping the other rocky area dimmer. Ive had my maxima clam going on almost two years so far in my 10 gallon (2 y/o tank, clam added 6 months in). I have 4x24w t5ho and I'm dosing two part as it's primarily a sps reef. I do one or two 25% changes a week and run a ac30 with chemipure and some biomax beads (mostly for when I set up a quarantine or hospital tank) Along with an ac70 fuge full of cheato. Flow is also supplemented with a K nano 250 placed just above and behind the clam, blowing over the top of Acro branches. I feed my two small ocillaris and purple firefish sparingly once a day (sometimes skipping a day) . The current fish were all added months apart, and for a while I didn't have fish so I fed oysterfeast.

Edited by Seamonkey84, 07 April 2012 - 10:57 PM.


#20
Disturbed22

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As far as long term, it wouldn't work out very well, but while it's still a manageable size you could do it as long as you can keep perameters stable (dont waste salt, dose and test, eventually may need a calcium reactor or drip system tk keep up with needs as they suck it up like a sponge in so little water). What kind of lighting do you have? spot lighting with a par30 could be used while keeping the other rocky area dimmer. Ive had my maxima clam going on almost two years so far in my 10 gallon (2 y/o tank, clam added 6 months in). I have 4x24w t5ho and I'm dosing two part as it's primarily a sps reef. I do one or two 25% changes a week and run a ac30 with chemipure and some biomax beads (mostly for when I set up a quarantine or hospital tank) Along with an ac70 fuge full of cheato. Flow is also supplemented with a K nano 250 placed just above and behind the clam, blowing over the top of Acro branches. I feed my two small ocillaris and purple firefish sparingly once a day (sometimes skipping a day) . The current fish were all added months apart, and for a while I didn't have fish so I fed oysterfeast.


I have a JBJ unibody 52watt LED.

#21
Seamonkey84

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Lighting would prob be fine but your going to need to dose and get a test kit to check your dosing levels as the clam grows. I read your other thread, and honestly your spending more and making more work for yourself just to avoid testing and doseing. Continuous waterchanges don't guarantee Alk and ca stability or keeping it at the levels the clam needs once it starts growing.