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Red Sea Salt...Why not to mix longer than 4hrs?


ps2cho

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Why is this a problem?

 

And also what does this exactly mean? Simply mixing it, or does it mean you cannot mix it, turn the powerhead off and do the water change the next day? Must you use it immediately after its all mixed? If not, must it be dumped out? Whats the deal?

 

What exactly are the restrictions?

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So you do a water change ever 4 hours on the disolved salt in the tank?

 

I don't see the issue besides common evaporation.

So why does the tub say specifically in upper case do NOT mix for more than 4hrs?

 

Does it precipitate out under certain conditions?

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I remember reading about this on a thread a few weeks ago but I can't remember it....

 

Either way, Red Sea says that if you mix it too long, the Mg, Ca, and Alk (my guess is Carbonate?) will precipitate out of the mixture. Basically, your params for the freshly mixed SW will be lower than what the bucket advertises.

 

Does it mean you should toss it out once you go past 4 hours? Nope, I used to mix RSCP for 12 hours and I get no problems at all. If anything, you'll probably get a dirty mixing bucket.

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Jackal_Knight

I remember reading about this on a thread a few weeks ago but I can't remember it....

 

Either way, Red Sea says that if you mix it too long, the Mg, Ca, and Alk (my guess is Carbonate?) will precipitate out of the mixture. Basically, your params for the freshly mixed SW will be lower than what the bucket advertises.

 

^^ thats pretty much the reason, there is a red sea video that explains it. But im on my phone so im not gonna look and post the video

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duncan-junkie

I've never had a problem.....mixed it for 5 days before using it, cuz i was lazy..........The pH dropped a little, but no biggie. Just dump a little more salt in there, mix it till the pH is where you want it and do your water change.

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Think about this..., what's the difference in mixing in a bucket using a power head or the water in your tank that is constantly mixing in theory? Lol

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if the water is still actually mixing, there shouldn't be any real reason for stuff to start going out of solution...
RSCP doesn't listen to any reason. Yes it was mixing non stop till it was used.

 

Think about this..., what's the difference in mixing in a bucket using a power head or the water in your tank that is constantly mixing in theory? Lol
I asked the question myself, if stuff precipitates out in the bucket, why doesn't it do that in the tank?
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Exactly!!! That's what I was laying in bed thinking about last night. Lol After reading this, I changed the times and my process for my AWC but started thinking. Doesn't make logical sense.

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  • 2 weeks later...
This video on youtube from Red Sea explains and shows you exactly who you should not over mix.

 

Search for : Coral Pro Salt Mixing Guide

 

Does that guy have a lazy eye or what he reading something in the background? Lol

 

But it still doesn't explain why this doesn't happen in the tank which is constantly being mixed and heated. Did I miss something?

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It talks about the elevated levels of calcium and carbonates of the mix, along with higher temps and pH during mixing, causing "clumping" (precipitation). It says that this can happen almost immediately when the water is significantly above 77°F and when using aeration pumps.

 

We know that different temperatures impact solubility of certain elements differently (I saw a good study on this, but can't find it right now). The small volume of water, along with the heat of the pump must cause local temps to exceed 77°. Aeration must also affect the pH in a way that compounds the precipitation.

 

IDK, I'm no chemist, so my only guess is that our tanks aren't usually, substantially over 77°F, and the pH (maybe due to the live rock and sand) must tend to be better suited to keep the mix in suspension. I have used it before, and like that you should use it immediately after mixing it clear.

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I guess Red sea changed their salt mixed ingredient and mixing method after all customers complained the nasty brown residual after mixing.

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HecticDialectics

 

It talks about the elevated levels of calcium and carbonates of the mix, along with higher temps and pH during mixing, causing "clumping" (precipitation). It says that this can happen almost immediately when the water is significantly above 77°F and when using aeration pumps.

 

We know that different temperatures impact solubility of certain elements differently (I saw a good study on this, but can't find it right now). The small volume of water, along with the heat of the pump must cause local temps to exceed 77°. Aeration must also affect the pH in a way that compounds the precipitation.

 

IDK, I'm no chemist, so my only guess is that our tanks aren't usually, substantially over 77°F, and the pH (maybe due to the live rock and sand) must tend to be better suited to keep the mix in suspension. I have used it before, and like that you should use it immediately after mixing it clear.

 

I dunno this is all enough for me to just not want to ever use Red Sea. So if I keep my tank at 79 and well aerated, the salt is precipitating out in my tank? Yeesh. Ridiculous. No thanks.

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