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Coral Vue Hydros

Algae Issue Question


chadgarner

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I have recently had an algae bloom (hair) and can't seem to get rid of it completely. My tank has been set up for 6 months now.

 

I dont have a phosphate test kit but my nitrates are at 0ppm.

 

I assumed that the phosphates are the issue.

 

I am currently running chemipure elite, purgen, and a small phosphate sponge.

 

My tank is a JBJ 28 gallon with AI SOL led lighting.

 

Does anyone have a suggestion on how to get rid of algae I'm running out of ideas?

 

What about incorporating an algae eating fish? What fish is everyone using?

 

I do have a CUC but the algae is growing faster then they can eat and I don't really want to overload my tank with crabs and snails.

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I dont have a phosphate test kit but my nitrates are at 0ppm.
You need a GOOD phosphate test kit. I wouldn't bother with an API kit. Is your nitrate kit a low range kit?

 

I assumed that the phosphates are the issue.
Me too.

 

I am currently running chemipure elite, purgen, and a small phosphate sponge.
How old is your CPE?

 

Does anyone have a suggestion on how to get rid of algae I'm running out of ideas?
Bring down the amount of phosphate you are importing. Now that you have algae, it is probably being utilized by the algae, so test kits might be a little misleading while you still have algae.

 

Reduced feeding, GFO (instead of your current media), and a good phosphate test kit can be invaluable tools. It's really hard to do without knowing your phosphate levels.

 

Spot treatment with hydrogen peroxide can sometimes help, but you still need to address the cause and not the symptom.

 

What about incorporating an algae eating fish? What fish is everyone using?
You could try a Blenny, but I wouldn't expect to see it make a big dent in it. Manual removal and phosphate/nitrate control will probably do more.

 

I do have a CUC but the algae is growing faster then they can eat and I don't really want to overload my tank with crabs and snails.
Yeah, Turbo snails and Emerald crabs might help, but nutrient control is still the key.
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You need a GOOD phosphate test kit. I wouldn't bother with an API kit. Is your nitrate kit a low range kit?

 

Me too.

 

How old is your CPE?

 

Bring down the amount of phosphate you are importing. Now that you have algae, it is probably being utilized by the algae, so test kits might be a little misleading while you still have algae.

 

Reduced feeding, GFO (instead of your current media), and a good phosphate test kit can be invaluable tools. It's really hard to do without knowing your phosphate levels.

 

Spot treatment with hydrogen peroxide can sometimes help, but you still need to address the cause and not the symptom.

 

You could try a Blenny, but I wouldn't expect to see it make a big dent in it. Manual removal and phosphate/nitrate control will probably do more.

 

Yeah, Turbo snails and Emerald crabs might help, but nutrient control is still the key.

 

 

So i just picked up a phosphate test and tested twice. 0ppm phosphate. I don't understand whats going on.

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Islandoftiki
Testing for phosphates is absolutely futile if you have a hair algae bloom. The algae consumes phosphates as it is available. Whenever you test, it's going to show zero because the algae has already used it.

 

This.

 

What this tells you is that most pest algaes are extremely efficient at using phosphates.

 

So, the biggest question is where are the nutrients coming from? For most tanks the only input of nutrients is either from built up nutrients in the sand bed or live rock that start leeching out, or excess food entering the system (overfeeding).

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Testing for phosphates is absolutely futile if you have a hair algae bloom. The algae consumes phosphates as it is available.

I agree and disagree with this. First if you want to test phosphates you need to get a low level phosphate test kit. I recommend the one made by Redsea. Any non low level test kit will show zero once you get below 1 ppm. Ideally you need to get it down to about .04 ppm to be realy effective against stopping algae growth. . Now I do agree with the fact the the algae will consume the phosphate. Its the same principle of a refugium. Now the real question, as stated above is what is the food source. Deep sand bends, lack of water circulation, to big of a bio load, source water can all be factors. You can also get your self into a cycle. Were the HA grows and consumes phosphates, then partly dies back once the phosphates have been consumed, which will releasing phosphate back into the water, which then feeds new HA to grow. The use of RO/Di source water will greatly help with the HA but still address any other issues.

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I agree and disagree with this. First if you want to test phosphates you need to get a low level phosphate test kit. I recommend the one made by Redsea. Any non low level test kit will show zero once you get below 1 ppm. Ideally you need to get it down to about .04 ppm to be realy effective against stopping algae growth. . Now I do agree with the fact the the algae will consume the phosphate. Its the same principle of a refugium. Now the real question, as stated above is what is the food source. Deep sand bends, lack of water circulation, to big of a bio load, source water can all be factors. You can also get your self into a cycle. Were the HA grows and consumes phosphates, then partly dies back once the phosphates have been consumed, which will releasing phosphate back into the water, which then feeds new HA to grow. The use of RO/Di source water will greatly help with the HA but still address any other issues.

 

 

I do have a low level test. My test goes down to 0.05ppm.

 

I have a 3 inch sand bed. I do stir the sand during water changes which is typically one a week, now twice.

 

I have an mp10 in a 28 gallon jbj I dont thinks its circulation.

 

I use RO water.

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I do have a low level test. My test goes down to 0.05ppm.
0.03ppm is as high as it should get (that's almost half of the lowest value on your kit). Ideally you should be able to differentiate between 0.02ppm (good) and 0.04ppm (high).
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0.03ppm is as high as it should get (that's almost half of the lowest value on your kit). Ideally you should be able to differentiate between 0.02ppm (good) and 0.04ppm (high).

 

 

I'm sorry i meant 0 to 0.05ppm.

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Some or all of these will help with GHA:

Lessen feedings.

Do water changes.

Start GFO.

Get CUC that eats GHA.

Check TDS in your RO/DI

Add Chaeto or other macros to help with nitrates

Peroxide dip rocks with GHA

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