Jump to content
Innovative Marine Aquariums

worying brow spots on my clown pair


daves new nano

Recommended Posts

daves new nano

hi folks, i need some advice

 

ive had my 60 litre nano up and runing bout 4 months now with no major problems so i thought its about time to add some fish.

 

i decided to go for a pair of clowns and a lawn mower blennie, i stocked them 3 weeks ago and every things been going swimmingly, until 2 days ago i noticed both clown have developed a few small brown spots on the bodys and fins

 

the spots are only on the orange bands and not the white.

 

my water params seem to be fine with nitrate, nitrite & ammonia at 0ppm although i have got some hair algae so there must b some nitrate present.

 

both fish seem to be brathing fine and having no problmes with swiming.

 

could these spots be caused by some thing lacking in there diet i feed them a mixture of marine flake and frozen marine mix?

 

or could they be a dissese of some sort?

 

any ideas would be helpfull

 

thanks

 

Dave

Link to comment
daves new nano

hi BK thamks for the relpy

 

the only corals i have are 2 colnies of Zoos and two mushroom rocks,

 

the other inhanitants are a cleaner shrimp, 4 hermits and a turbo

Link to comment

Thats normal for clownfish. Some say its a phase the fish goes through as it gets older, but more than likely its just irritation from its host. Nothing to worry about.

Link to comment

They look like zoanthid stings. Are the clowns rubbing up against your zoos? My clarkii took vigorously to a zoanthid colony and developed the same type of spotting.

Link to comment

skye- are you sure that the considerably mild sting of a zoanthid could inflict such harm to a fish that is meant to take a constant stronger sting? Not saying that you're wrong but some clowns even go into carpet anemones which pack quite a punch.

 

Ive seen a lot of clowns get this in my home aquarium (soon to be followed by death) but never at my store.. We have had some clowns for at least a month and no spot development. I honestly don't know for sure, but i've seen it before. Keep us updated..

 

SS

Link to comment

hmmm.. if im not mistake thats the clown disease, forget the scientific name... i took care of one of those yesterday. i could be wrong, i'd recommend a freshwater dip anyways, cant hurt to be sure.

Link to comment

No... clownfish disease is brooklynella, and very different.

 

IME FW dips arent just a random thing to do, "just in case". Quarantine and treat.

 

Also, clowns often DO get a reaction the appears as brown splotches when they host in an "unnatural" stinging host.

Link to comment
daves new nano

hi guys thanks for the input.

 

Ive been doing a bit of reading on Brookynella Hostillis on wet web media n from the descriptions and pics ive seen i dont think thats whats wrong as neither of my clowns seem to be ailing or off there feed.

There still as greedy as ever!!!

 

thanks for the advise, i was wondering how to do a freshwater dip just as a precaution

Link to comment

He asked how to do a freshwater dip, why post saying "dont do it." ???

 

For future reference -- also when adding fish its a good idea too.

 

1. Check the pH of your tap water, between 8.0-8.3 is acceptable, you want the fish to feel as little transition with the pH as possible being as he is already going to notice a huge difference in salt (1.023+ to 1.00000). Adjust if necessary.

 

2. Make sure the water is the same temp as the tank. There are two ways to do this. You can bag up the freshwater VERY tightly so none of it mixes with your tank water. A couple plastic bags will do. Float them in the tank for about 20 minutes to completely equalize the temps.

 

3. Put the water in a clear container or bowl. It might be easier on the fish to have the sides dark and the room lit to a minimum to counter the stress somewhat. Put the fish in using a clean net.

 

4. Observe the fishes behavior entirely for 10 minutes. Don't worry, the fish will live. If the fish dies, it is because it was already too far gone. We once forgot about a pair of maroons in fw, they stayed in there for 8 hours at the store and were doing just fine. Exceptions to the rule-- anthias' and fuzzy dwarf lions. Do not dip them! Not only do they rarely import parasites, but it almost always fails!

 

5. If the fish lays down and breathes very heavy, tap the side of the container or lightly swish the water with the butt of the net, perhaps touching the fish to get them to swim about. Remember, the more the fish swims, the better chance it has of shaking the parasites off its body. Under our observations, most parasites die within 6 minutes, so if your fish can handle that, do it! The only time you should ever take the fish out of the dip if it no longer responds to agitation, or if its breathing just stops, even then dont worry! They spring right back to life as soon as they hit the salt. We have dipped thousands of fish at the store and have lost 6, they were all lions and anthias'.

 

Side note:* inverts do not need to be, and should not ever be dipped. It is impossible for them to bring in any disease that will harm your tankmates!*

Link to comment

I agree, looks like spots from the zoanthids. No need for drastic measures until you notice a change in behavior that signals stress/declining health...i.e. heavy breathing, sluggish swimming behavior, etc.

Link to comment
daves new nano

thanks for the input tiga, im quite sure there gona be fine there still greedy little *#@ers n dont seem to be bothered by the spots.

 

thanks for all the advice guys n gals its been great.

 

Dave

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...