Jump to content
inTank Media Baskets

Is my neon green Kenya tree dead?


InAtTheDeepEnd

Recommended Posts

InAtTheDeepEnd

Haven't changed anything in the tank but my tree looks like this, flopped over and a bit wrinkled, as of yesterday afternoon and this morning and I'm not sure why. Has it died? Why?  I had the lights off since the 17th but they've been back on for two days now.

PXL_20220525_073314417.NIGHT.jpg

PXL_20220525_073334846.NIGHT.jpg

PXL_20220525_073304188.NIGHT.jpg

Link to comment

Definitely not dead.  Why did you have the lights off?  They get the majority of their nutrition from photosynthesis.  In addition, they can capture micro-plankton with their polyps and even uptake inorganic nutrients (phosphate and nitrate) from the the water.  They can also occasionally shed (slough off a thin layer of tissue) to remove algae, detritus, etc.  People often get concerned the first time they witness this.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 2
Link to comment

They flop when unhappy. It's also normal for them to look funky at night, as they shrink down to protect themselves. Keep your lights on so your corals don't starve, and it should sort itself out.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
InAtTheDeepEnd

Yeah I turned the lights off and covered the tank to help tackle a massive blue green cyanobacteria issue, I wasn't deliberately 'starving' my corals 😅 just so long as it's not dead it should be fine now because the cyano is gone and the lights are back on.

  • Like 1
Link to comment

Soft corals need nitrates. All corals do, but especially softies. Generally you want about 5-10ppm. You also want at least 0.03ppm phosphates. Compared to that, your current phosphates are quite high (and your test kit isn't useful for reef sensitivities of phosphate), however, phosphate that's quite high is fine for corals as long as there's also some nitrates. 

 

More nitrates would probably be helpful. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
InAtTheDeepEnd
7 hours ago, Tired said:

Soft corals need nitrates. All corals do, but especially softies. Generally you want about 5-10ppm. You also want at least 0.03ppm phosphates. Compared to that, your current phosphates are quite high (and your test kit isn't useful for reef sensitivities of phosphate), however, phosphate that's quite high is fine for corals as long as there's also some nitrates. 

 

More nitrates would probably be helpful. 

OK, thank you very much for your help, really useful 🙂

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...