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Subsea

Smart bacteria. Are they necessary?

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Subsea   

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130916122214.htm

 

This link discribes the human anatamy gut cavity bacteria and its effect on immune system.   It discribes cross talk between gut cavity and immune system self regulationg response.

Smart bacteria.

 

Randy Homes Farley discribes an auto feedback loop that regulates cynobacteria conversion of organic phosphate to inorganic phosphate that is uptaken by cyno.  

Smart bacteria.

 

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4286716/

 

This peer reviewed research paper discribes the coral holobiont which is a holistic view of the health of our reefs.   In fact, skewed bacteria species populations happened well in advance of declining reefs.  What can we do to assist immune system in fish?  I go to the HEB seafood  counter and buy live clams, mussels and oysters.

The fish love it.

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seabass   
12 hours ago, Subsea said:

What can we do to assist immune system in fish?

I'm thinking less about our fish and more about the diversity of microbes and fauna in our tanks.  IDK, maybe I missed the point of the article (I read such a small portion of it); but I have felt that many problems which we face in reefing have to do with lack of diversity and/or balance, but namely lack of diversity.  This might be especially true when we start our reefs with dry rock and sand.  And the "live sand", that many people use, contains only a small number of cultured bacteria strains.  The same can be said for the cultured nitrifying bacteria, found in bottled bacteria (and used in fishless cycling protocols).

 

I have to admit that it's probably been over a decade since I've purchased live rock which came from the ocean.  I have often wondered what type of fauna I've been missing out on by using dry rock; but maybe a more important element, that I've deprived my tanks of, is the microbial diversity that my earlier tanks enjoyed.  While I feel better about not buying rock harvested from ocean reefs, this has me thinking that I might try seeding these microbes by introducing a little live rock.  Perhaps land based rock, which has been  maricultured in the open ocean, is an appropriate alternative for introducing these microbes and fauna.

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Subsea   
2 hours ago, seabass said:

I'm thinking less about our fish and more about the diversity of microbes and fauna in our tanks.  IDK, maybe I missed the point of the article (I read such a small portion of it); but I have felt that many problems which we face in reefing have to do with lack of diversity and/or balance, but namely lack of diversity.  This might be especially true when we start our reefs with dry rock and sand.  And the "live sand", that many people use, contains only a small number of cultured bacteria strains.  The same can be said for the cultured nitrifying bacteria, found in bottled bacteria (and used in fishless cycling protocols).

 

I have to admit that it's probably been over a decade since I've purchased live rock which came from the ocean.  I have often wondered what type of fauna I've been missing out on by using dry rock; but maybe a more important element, that I've deprived my tanks of, is the microbial diversity that my earlier tanks enjoyed.  While I feel better about not buying rock harvested from ocean reefs, this has me thinking that I might try seeding these microbes by introducing a little live rock.  Perhaps land based rock, which has been  maricultured in the open ocean, is an appropriate alternative for introducing these microbes and fauna.

Seabass,

Diversity of micro fauna and fana is exactly the point.  While I have seeded dry Edwards Plateau limestone by placing it next to diver collected live rock from the Gulf of Mexico, there is no comparison to the diversity that comes from the ocean.  With respect to depleting the reef with the collection of live rock, that is not the case with live rock from Florida.  There are less than 20 permits for live rock collection in Florida with no more permits being issued due to pressure from enviromental groups.  It is unfortunate that this source of live rock will go away when these permit holders die.  To collect this live rock from the bottom of the GOM requires leasing a section of GOM with a clean bottom, then barge tons of dry limestone out to the lease.  Initially these rock farmers would drop dry rock from the barge to sink to the bottom.  With further pressure from enviromentalist, the state legislators restricted the placement of this rock by hand with divers.  I have worked with two of these companies out of Tampa Bay.  IMO, the true enviromentalist are the owners of these live rock farms.  Where there was once nothing but sandy bottom, there is now a thriving reef.

 

http://www.tampabaysaltwater.com/liverock/index.html

 

http://www.gulfliverock.com/premium-decorative-rock.html

 

 

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