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Coral Vue Hydros

Oenone worms


pineo

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Oenone worms are not reef safe! They are prolific predators and kill snails and clams, possibly fish (though I've not experienced personally). They are nocturnal, and retreat VERY fast when disturbed by light or vibration. The easiest way to identify an Oenone worm is by examining the remains of its prey. The worm uses a secreted residue - slime - which apparently stuns its victims. Once stunned the worm simply devours its prey. The secreted residue also surrounds the worms, allowing it to quickly retreat back to its burrow. The slime tunnel remains behind, even after the oenone has fully retreated; it is a dead giveaway.

 

What to look for:

slime tunnels

excess slime covering remains of prey

orange body (can stretch remarkably far)

yellow appendages along the side of the segments (not bristles, but fleshy lobes)

 

I have included some links that are useful.

 

A picture I took, contrasting a typical bristle worm and an oenone worm (the larger, orange worm):

_DSC0006.jpg

 

This post illustrated a red/purple ink that stains whatever the worm touches. I can personally vouch for this. Today I broke down my tank infested with these worms. They all lived in 2 rocks. I dropped the rocks in a 5 gallon bucket full with hot RO/DI waste water. The water turned pink...

http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=924046

 

Lastly, another reefer also struggling with oenone:

http://www.nano-reef.com/forums/index.php?...6&hl=oenone

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Oenone worms are not reef safe! They are prolific predators and kill snails and clams, possibly fish (though I've not experienced personally). They are nocturnal, and retreat VERY fast when disturbed by light or vibration. The easiest way to identify an Oenone worm is by examining the remains of its prey. The worm uses a secreted residue - slime - which apparently stuns its victims. Once stunned the worm simply devours its prey. The secreted residue also surrounds the worms, allowing it to quickly retreat back to its burrow. The slime tunnel remains behind, even after the oenone has fully retreated; it is a dead giveaway.

 

What to look for:

slime tunnels

excess slime covering remains of prey

orange body (can stretch remarkably far)

yellow appendages along the side of the segments (not bristles, but fleshy lobes)

 

I have included some links that are useful.

 

A picture I took, contrasting a typical bristle worm and an oenone worm (the larger, orange worm):

 

 

This post illustrated a red/purple ink that stains whatever the worm touches. I can personally vouch for this. Today I broke down my tank infested with these worms. They all lived in 2 rocks. I dropped the rocks in a 5 gallon bucket full with hot RO/DI waste water. The water turned pink...

 

Lastly, another reefer also struggling with oenone:

Nasty ......... wow

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heh yea...bite your head off man

 

Yes very nasty .... here's a link to a video of one but there are several on U-Tube

 

 

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