Jump to content
Pod Your Reef

bulkhead cracked?!


Snapper

Recommended Posts

Where u see the water drip is exactly where this leak is coming from, can my bulkhead have a crack? It was fine until I slightly loosened it earlier than tightened it back up.

 

759B5B51-7BC5-4434-9EFA-E247C9338CDE-241-000000130319067B.jpg

 

Can I glue it or something?

 

Wondering if anyone has seen this before i spend 2 hours takign thsi thing apart.

 

Its right where the bulkhead threads meet the bulkhead front, the leak appears to be between those 2 parts

Link to comment
I tried a couple times, ill do it again now i hope its just that no time for a headache

 

Did you remember the teflon tape? I had a drip in the same spot when I was setting up my bulkhead

Link to comment

A few things could have happen. The flange on the front of the bulk head could have cracked. The retaining nut could have cracked or the threads may have stripped out and is now popping back when you try to tighten it. You say you loosen it and then retighten it. Some thing like a grain of sand or some other large particles may have gotten between the gasket and the tank allowing water to leak out. I would loosen it again and try to reseat the gasket. If you install a bulk head properly, you never need to use teflon tape or any other kind of sealant.

Link to comment

After 2 hours i got the gasket to stop leaking, i lowered the inside gasket and it worked.

however my E Drain does have very very light leak "i am assuming" as I see salt left arond the rim of the outside 90 and i remember the teflon tape on that connect was only half way which i regret now. I have to retape that and its a pain removing the 90's on this drain. I hate myself for doing that.

Link to comment

The stick PVC thread lubricant is amazing. I'm in Phoenix with long 115 degree summers, my swimming pool was installed in 1983 with PVC plumbing for the pumps and filter and the sealant is still pliable to this day. I replaced my filter pump with a two speed model last year and used the same sealant because I was so impressed. Teflon pipe dope drys out and cracks away and tap tears and snags on the sharp threads and imperfections. The PVC lubricant stick fills in any imperfections and low spots and stays pliable for life.

Link to comment
Forget the teflon tape and read my bulkhead tips thread. You will learn better methods how to prevent leaks permanently. Teflon tape was never designed for PVC.

 

http://www.reef2reef.com/forums/equipment-...khead-tips.html

I agree and disagree with this. Bulkheads installation does not require teflon tape for the instillation. However if you use teflon tape appropriately on male adapters and this works on all types of pipe thread, will work. One of the biggest mistakes is to use to much tape when rapping threads. You also have to rap it in the proper direction.

Link to comment
Again, teflon tape was never designed for PVC.

This article is from LASCO, one of the largest PVC manufacturers in the world, read the part about not using teflon tape or dope, I'm not making it up:

http://www.lascofittings.com/supportcenter...adedPlastic.asp

 

Teflon tape is not to be used on PVC period.

What this is an article of a manufacture covering there own buts. They talk about the biggest issue of installers is to use to much which adds bulk. "which I stated above." Go ask any plumber and pool guy, they will tell you they use it on PVC for many years with out problems. But this is point less argument. Do what you want, as long as you don't over tighten or use to much or use some thing that could be toxic. As long as the joint doesn't leak. I personally like to use tape with a little bit of silicone. I have done thousands of PVC joints that way with out any problems.

Link to comment

I have pointed out how my pool, installed in 1983 using the PVC thread stick lubricant is still pliable and drip free to this day. PVC lubricants are far superior to teflon tape and I started using it in my Municipal PVC chlorine system installations in 1987 when I started installing them. That's in both vacuum and high pressure solution systems and no problems to this day.

 

Try it, I think you wil be surprised at how well it works by comparison.

Link to comment
I have pointed out how my pool, installed in 1983 using the PVC thread stick lubricant is still pliable and drip free to this day. PVC lubricants are far superior to teflon tape and I started using it in my Municipal PVC chlorine system installations in 1987 when I started installing them. That's in both vacuum and high pressure solution systems and no problems to this day.

 

Try it, I think you wil be surprised at how well it works by comparison.

I'm not disagreeing that your method doesn't work. I'm just saying that if teflon tape is used properly, will work on PVC threaded joints. Like I said do what works for you.

Link to comment

And here is the product Spears Manufacturing, the other PVC maker, recommends:

http://press.kscdirect.com/?p=806

 

If the PVC lubricants were not superior they would not recommend nor sell them. Again, I'm not making it up and its not just personal preference. Just because someone can "get away" with using something for years does not mean it is the best way to go. PVC lubricants are readily available at any HD, Lowes or hardware so whey not use them?

 

Tape is not recommended.

Link to comment
And here is the product Spears Manufacturing, the other PVC maker, recommends:

http://press.kscdirect.com/?p=806

 

If the PVC lubricants were not superior they would not recommend nor sell them. Again, I'm not making it up and its not just personal preference. Just because someone can "get away" with using something for years does not mean it is the best way to go. PVC lubricants are readily available at any HD, Lowes or hardware so whey not use them?

 

Tape is not recommended.

OK, so I spent some time on Google. I searched "can you use teflon tape with pvc" and a few variations of that. If using teflon tape was an issue you would find hits of people talking about not using it. Well you don't. It is commonly used on PVC with out issues as long as you use it properly. What are you afraid of? Why do you have a bug up your butt on this. This is typical forum were some one tells you that there is one way and only there way and every one else is wrong. When in the real world there are more then one way to accomplish something. Why would professional plumbers and pool companies continue using a product "as you are calming" will fail. I can't find evidence that teflon tape is a bad product to use on PVC.

Link to comment
OK, so I spent some time on Google. I searched "can you use teflon tape with pvc" and a few variations of that. If using teflon tape was an issue you would find hits of people talking about not using it. Well you don't. It is commonly used on PVC with out issues as long as you use it properly. What are you afraid of? Why do you have a bug up your butt on this. This is typical forum were some one tells you that there is one way and only there way and every one else is wrong. When in the real world there are more then one way to accomplish something. Why would professional plumbers and pool companies continue using a product "as you are calming" will fail. I can't find evidence that teflon tape is a bad product to use on PVC.

Az works in Water management. You're basically telling him he doesn't know about his own occupation, which i could see why a "bug is up his butt.". Also, think about what you said a post or two back... "ask any plumber". Yes, Teflon tape can hold for a while, but az is talking about long term. If you ask a plumber what he uses, he will tell you about the product that insures he will have more work 5-10 years down the line. Az is reading from people who have no direct gain from people using the wrong product so they have no reason to lie or embellish a story.

 

Idk about you, but I also work in a municipal work environment. (just not in water). The LAST thing you want to do for the public is use an inferior product.

Link to comment
Az works in Water management. You're basically telling him he doesn't know about his own occupation, which i could see why a "bug is up his butt.". Also, think about what you said a post or two back... "ask any plumber". Yes, Teflon tape can hold for a while, but az is talking about long term. If you ask a plumber what he uses, he will tell you about the product that insures he will have more work 5-10 years down the line. Az is reading from people who have no direct gain from people using the wrong product so they have no reason to lie or embellish a story.

 

Idk about you, but I also work in a municipal work environment. (just not in water). The LAST thing you want to do for the public is use an inferior product.

First, I'm not saying he doesn't know his job.

 

I was getting a feeling like I've done this before. then I realized who he was. Great here we go again. Do we need another discussion on PH. LOL Like I stated in another thread, just because he works at a water treatment plant, doesn't make him an expert on all matters retaining to water chemistry or plumbing. As far as I know he could be a security guard, guarding a sewer plant and just because he has over a thousands post doesn't make him all knowable either. He seems to get his panties in a twist when some one questions what he says. You have no idea on my expertise ether. Nothing I said is not true. If you know how to use the product, it will work.....

Link to comment

Working and lasting are two different things. You can half arse something and it will "work" or you can do it correctly the first time and it will "last". Just beacuse tape works doesn't make it right. For the same price and availability and a longer useful life why not use the product specifically designed for the task at hand?

 

Security gauards don't manage municipal utility systems that serve tens of thousands of service connections by the way, nor do they work for major nationwide environmental engineering firms on multimillion $$ projects as project managers.

Link to comment
Working and lasting are two different things. You can half arse something and it will "work" or you can do it correctly the first time and it will "last". Just beacuse tape works doesn't make it right. For the same price and availability and a longer useful life why not use the product specifically designed for the task at hand?

 

Security gauards don't manage municipal utility systems that serve tens of thousands of service connections by the way, nor do they work for major nationwide environmental engineering firms on multimillion $$ projects as project managers.

Well your resume doesn't impress me enough to take every thing you say as an absolute. If you weren't so full of your self and read what I posted, I said that I prefer to use silicone with teflon tape, which is basically doing the same as the product you are recommending. I have done over a thousands of joints like that for over 15 years and even the early ones are still holding fine. So I don't know if that's long term enough for you, but it is for me.

Link to comment

Who knew teflon tape would be so controversial?

 

Well, it's a little too late for me since everything is running and I have already sealed with teflon per the glass-hole kit installation instructions.

 

Does using teflon mean it might leak at any instance or it will leak after 2 years? 5 years?

Link to comment
Who knew teflon tape would be so controversial?

 

Well, it's a little too late for me since everything is running and I have already sealed with teflon per the glass-hole kit installation instructions.

 

Does using teflon mean it might leak at any instance or it will leak after 2 years? 5 years?

I'm sure if you do enough research you will find instances were all products have failed on some ones instillation. The reality of it is that it shouldn't fail unless you mess with it.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...