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Feeding Photosynthetic Coral


fretfreak13

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I don't know about the rest of you guys, but I have noticed a trend of new reefers come onto NR buying corals that are photosynthetic, freaking out when they don't open/inflate right away after being put into the tank, and trying to cram food in their mouths. I'm not knowledgeable enough to write a proper care sheet that wouldn't have a ton of imperfections to it, but I think it would be a helpful thing here that we could refer newbies to. It seems that just because zoas have mouths, some people think that they are supposed to eat three times a day like a human being. These same newcomers also seem to be having phosphate and nitrate issues, as well.

 

Am I wrong, or is it not true that photosynthetic corals like softies, LPS, and SPS grow from the hundred+ dollar light fixtures we put on our tanks, as well as the trace elements found in our salt?

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You have a valid point. In regards to feeding photosynthetic coral, less is more. Especially when it pertains to small systems. Better to err on the side of caution as over feeding without nutrient export will lead down a path of disappointment, despair, apathy and exit.

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With that being said, should I try to write something that would be good enough to sticky? Of course, I'm 100% all for people chiming in and making it a group effort. I know there are far more qualified reefers here on NR who could do a better job, but if no one else wants to...

 

I'm just tired of answering the same question and cringing as I do it. lol

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With that being said, should I try to write something that would be good enough to sticky? Of course, I'm 100% all for people chiming in and making it a group effort. I know there are far more qualified reefers here on NR who could do a better job, but if no one else wants to...

 

I'm just tired of answering the same question and cringing as I do it. lol

 

They could of course be directed to the existing database on corals that anyone can can access and where they can find at least the basic info they need, and in quite a few cases far more than the bare minimum

 

I think that in answering posts from newcomers directing them there would certainly give them a better understanding of what care is needed for the corals they are getting

 

FWIW

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I agree, Albert, however I am moreso talking about the surge of new reefers that we have who are under fourteen years old, who may have a hard time reading some scientific articles. I have never read these databases, are they were on NR? Can you link me to them?

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I agree, Albert, however I am moreso talking about the surge of new reefers that we have who are under fourteen years old, who may have a hard time reading some scientific articles. I have never read these databases, are they were on NR? Can you link me to them?

 

At top of any page click on LIBRARY and then on the drop down you should see Coral Database and select that and then select the type of coral and then the specific one you want

 

That will show you the info and it is not scientific but written in easy to understand language

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Ah, I see. However, none of them address physically feeding the corals except for the non-photosynthetic ones. I still think we need something here specifically explaining that corals that are photosynthetic do not need to be fed like so many people believe. I'm definitely not trying to argue with you, Albert. I know you're the go-to guy for just about everything here on NR haha.

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altolamprologus
Ah, I see. However, none of them address physically feeding the corals except for the non-photosynthetic ones. I still think we need something here specifically explaining that corals that are photosynthetic do not need to be fed like so many people believe. I'm definitely not trying to argue with you, Albert. I know you're the go-to guy for just about everything here on NR haha.

They don't need to be directly fed, as they can get their nutrition not produced by zooxanthellae from the natural zooplankton populations in our tanks. However, it is well known and proven that corals grow faster when fed directly in closed systems. IMO a sticky telling people to not feed their corals is an absurd idea.

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jedimasterben
They don't need to be directly fed, as they can get their nutrition not produced by zooxanthellae from the natural zooplankton populations in our tanks. However, it is well known and proven that corals grow faster when fed directly in closed systems. IMO a sticky telling people to not feed their corals is an absurd idea.

+1, and then +1 again

 

 

If it has a mouth, it has a purpose - to feed. Every study I've ever seen all say that corals do not receive 100% of their nutrition from photosynthesis - usually between 60 and 90%, depending on the coral. As long as you have fish in your system that are fed often, and you have measurable nitrate and phosphate levels, you should be ok with not feeding corals directly. However, as alto pointed out, growth - who doesn't want their corals to grow faster (and I'd say also be healthier at the same time)?

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Alto & Jedi: You're right, but that's not really what I meant. Reading back I see that it came across that way though. I know corals eat. I feed mine twice a week. I guess what I was trying to get at was explaining to newcomers that may not totally have a handle on maintaining balance/water parameters that corals do not need to eat in our systems to survive. Yes, they can be fed, and it can be beneficial, but it can also be detrimental to the rest of the tank if done in excess. I have seen two threads this past week where a coral was bought from the LFS, brought home, put in the tank, and had food thrown at it before it even got accustomed to its new home.

 

I'm not hoping for a thread to say "don't feed your corals", I'm hoping for a thread to explain why it isn't completely necessary, feeding them excessively (imo, more than a few times a week in our nano systems, unless the person has superfilters) can do more harm than good, and the proper way to feed them.

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