Jump to content
Top Shelf Aquatics

No white LEDS?


Jambomac

Recommended Posts

jedimasterben

White light is made up of three colors - red, green, and blue. RGB LEDs, instead of going ahead and mixing them under one diode, has one of each diode in each cap. You can then program the intensity of each.

 

 

I would not recommend RGB LEDs. Watt for watt, they don't really compare to a standard NW & RB configuration.

Link to comment
White light is made up of three colors - red, green, and blue. RGB LEDs, instead of going ahead and mixing them under one diode, has one of each diode in each cap. You can then program the intensity of each.

 

 

I would not recommend RGB LEDs. Watt for watt, they don't really compare to a standard NW & RB configuration.

 

Much more logical answer than the first thanks, but is that due to visual light as opposed capabilitys as when they are all on it creates white?

Link to comment
Much more logical answer than the first thanks, but is that due to visual light as opposed capabilitys as when they are all on it creates white?

Well don't be stupid and ask dumb questions. Simple as that! :slap:

Link to comment
Well don't be stupid and ask dumb questions. Simple as that! :slap:

Did you even read jedi's response? Could you elaborate more on what he said?

Link to comment
Well don't be stupid and ask dumb questions. Simple as that! :slap:

 

I asked the question as i don't understand and you're smartarse answers don't help.

 

There are no stupid questions just stupid people.

Link to comment
jedimasterben
Much more logical answer than the first thanks, but is that due to visual light as opposed capabilitys as when they are all on it creates white?

To sum it up, I found this post on CandlePowerForums:

That's correct, but there is how we see and then there is how objects reflect the light shining on them. For example, the right combination of red and green can stimulate our receptors in exactly the same manner as yellow, so we perceive yellow and cannot tell the difference. That's all well and good for displays and things like that, but what if a pigment only reflected a narrow band of yellow wavelengths (not some red and some green--just pure spectral yellow), and the light source has green and red wavelengths represented in narrow bands, but not yellow? There wouldn't be much of that yellow light reflected, I imagine, and therefore little yellow for our broad-band red and green receptors to pick up and interpret, making the color rendering inaccurate. That's just one example of what can go wrong when you have a wonky, messed-up spectrum, even if white looks white and the peak sensitivities of the human eye are taken care of.

 

To illustrate, here is how we see color:

540px-Cone-fundamentals-with-srgb-spectrum.svg.png

 

And here is the spectrum of an RGB-type white LED:

800px-Red-YellowGreen-Blue_LED_spectra.png

 

Such an LED should work fine for a display device, but as a light source for illumination, it has a serious lack of spectral yellow output. This means that even though it can display (to human eyes) every yellow hue, it cannot render all such hues accurately when it is used to illuminate actual objects (even with human eyes looking at the reflected light). The bottom line is that no matter how we see colors, the only way to get accurate color rendering is illumination with a full and properly balanced spectrum and with a CCT of 5000K-6500K (analogous to various forms of daylight that could all be considered ideal). LEDs aren't nearly there yet, and the best overall compromise that maintains maximum efficiency is to use a bit more Ce:YAG phosphor to get to a CCT in the vicinity of 4000K for better balance.

 

This is one of the best explanations I have ever seen of why to use neutral white instead of cool white, and they aren't even talking about corals!

Link to comment
Also the LED in the picture is not Cree but a generic chineese RGB. Cree makes MCE in RGBW. For a picture see the data sheet here:

http://www.cree.com/~/media/Files/Cree/LED...ng/XLampMCE.pdf

Whats interesting in that data sheet is the 'dynamic white'. A mix of cool and warm on one emitter. Interesting.

 

So are you saying that OCREEF are selling as Cree when it isn't and do they get away with that disclaimer by saying OCREEF Cree

Link to comment
jedimasterben
So are you saying that OCREEF are selling as Cree when it isn't and do they get away with that disclaimer by saying OCREEF Cree

Very few of the fixtures that mention "Cree" in their name or description actual use Cree LEDs.

Link to comment
Very few of the fixtures that mention "Cree" in their name or description actual use Cree LEDs.

 

It even states Lamp type Cree MCE RGB.

 

If thats not false advertising what is and these aren't some chinese company but aledgedly a reputable American one. Me thinks if you stick with Radion or TMC your safe but the rest your taking a chance with.

Link to comment
Drunken Master
Very few of the fixtures that mention "Cree" in their name or description actual use Cree LEDs.

 

What about the cree led stars you can get from rapid led and ledgroupbuy to name a few, are those potentially not true cree leds?

Link to comment
jedimasterben
What about the cree led stars you can get from rapid led and ledgroupbuy to name a few, are those potentially not true cree leds?

No, those are definitely Cree. No doubt about that.

Link to comment

Well this is what the potentially non CREE LEDS looks like

 

 

About 10-12 inches above surface not properly mounted at all so don't mind the dark patches

and there will be 2 of them hope this works out and i didn't get screwed.

Link to comment
Well this is what the potentially non CREE LEDS looks like

 

 

About 10-12 inches above surface not properly mounted at all so don't mind the dark patches

and there will be 2 of them hope this works out and i didn't get screwed.

 

 

You will find you need to be increasingly vigilant with respect to leds if in the case of Cree you want original

Non Genuine Cree

looks like a Cree but has very little in the way of performance of a Cree.

Link to comment
jedimasterben
You will find you need to be increasingly vigilant with respect to leds if in the case of Cree you want original

Non Genuine Cree

looks like a Cree but has very little in the way of performance of a Cree.

+1, They're getting sneakier and sneakier. Gotta be careful and only buy from reputable sources to be sure what you're purchasing is genuine.

Link to comment

Ok decided to E-Mail OCREEF on what they use on there bulbs and this is there response

 

>People have stated on forums that you don't use cree leds on your red green blue par38 remote controlled led bulb as you's state you do but the picture of the led is not cree

 

Hi James,

 

We do use 3 watt high quality LEDs in all of lighting products, including CREE and/or Bridgelux in our RGB PAR38's.

 

Sincerely,

OCReef Use following URL to reply.

 

From what i can find all bulbs are don't use CREE and bridgelux are at least of as high a standard.

Link to comment
jedimasterben
Ok decided to E-Mail OCREEF on what they use on there bulbs and this is there response

 

>People have stated on forums that you don't use cree leds on your red green blue par38 remote controlled led bulb as you's state you do but the picture of the led is not cree

 

Hi James,

 

We do use 3 watt high quality LEDs in all of lighting products, including CREE and/or Bridgelux in our RGB PAR38's.

 

Sincerely,

OCReef Use following URL to reply.

 

From what i can find all bulbs are don't use CREE and bridgelux are at least of as high a standard.

Hmm, they're so specific about it. I doubt they are using Cree at all.

Link to comment

They have removed these bulbs since my E-Mail well at least i saved somebody money are they even an american company or just a chinese one posing.

 

I think avoid at all cost, if i am willing to stand by the quality of my bulbs i wouldn't be removing them from my site. Down 150 Euro and wouldn't say i'll see that again.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...