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10G Stand Stand


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I am planning on building a nicer stand for my 10 gallon. I will be using 2x4's for support, and the frame measurements will be 20" x 10.5" x ???. I am not sure what height should I use for it, and I want to be safe.

 

Currently the stand that I have, measures around 28" in height, but I would like my new stand to be a little higher, around 31" - 35."

 

Should I be safe with 35" ?

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AquaticDiscounts
I am planning on building a nicer stand for my 10 gallon. I will be using 2x4's for support, and the frame measurements will be 20" x 10.5" x ???. I am not sure what height should I use for it, and I want to be safe.

 

Currently the stand that I have, measures around 28" in height, but I would like my new stand to be a little higher, around 31" - 35."

 

Should I be safe with 35" ?

35" is fine. I built mine about 36 inches high and its very stable. you could use high quality 3/4 inch plywood.and join it with glue and pocket holes & screws

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A 10 gallon tank will weight about 120 lbs with everything in it. Using 2x4's would be wayyyyyyyy overkill. Overbuilding your stand is only going to make it heavier/more expensive. You could use 1/2" plywood all around, or use 1"x2" framing lumber with 1/4" plywood skin.

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A 10 gallon tank will weight about 120 lbs with everything in it. Using 2x4's would be wayyyyyyyy overkill. Overbuilding your stand is only going to make it heavier/more expensive. You could use 1/2" plywood all around, or use 1"x2" framing lumber with 1/4" plywood skin.

 

 

true, I will change my plans now

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Assuming that the stand will be 10" front to back, and 32" tall, that the stand weighs about 30 lbs, and the tank will weigh about 100, you would only need to pull the top of the stand about 5" forward and it would fall the rest of the way. It would only take about 20 lbs of force, pulling forward on the top of the stand, to pull it over. If any kids live or visit there, I think it's a hazard, and it's still too easy to knock over for my peace of mind. If you screw the top of the stand into a stud in the wall, it'll be rock solid, but a narrow base with a heavy weight at the top is very easy to push over.

 

You could make it 13" front to back,and slide the tank to the back leaving a 3" flat space in front of the tank, and put a 50 lb bag of sand in the bottom of the stand, and then it would be a lot more stable (you would need to pull on the top of the stand with about 60 lbs of force to pull it over)

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Assuming that the stand will be 10" front to back, and 32" tall, that the stand weighs about 30 lbs, and the tank will weigh about 100, you would only need to pull the top of the stand about 5" forward and it would fall the rest of the way. It would only take about 20 lbs of force, pulling forward on the top of the stand, to pull it over. If any kids live or visit there, I think it's a hazard, and it's still too easy to knock over for my peace of mind. If you screw the top of the stand into a stud in the wall, it'll be rock solid, but a narrow base with a heavy weight at the top is very easy to push over.

 

You could make it 13" front to back,and slide the tank to the back leaving a 3" flat space in front of the tank, and put a 50 lb bag of sand in the bottom of the stand, and then it would be a lot more stable (you would need to pull on the top of the stand with about 60 lbs of force to pull it over)

 

I like it... STATICS!!!!!

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Assuming that the stand will be 10" front to back, and 32" tall, that the stand weighs about 30 lbs, and the tank will weigh about 100, you would only need to pull the top of the stand about 5" forward and it would fall the rest of the way. It would only take about 20 lbs of force, pulling forward on the top of the stand, to pull it over. If any kids live or visit there, I think it's a hazard, and it's still too easy to knock over for my peace of mind. If you screw the top of the stand into a stud in the wall, it'll be rock solid, but a narrow base with a heavy weight at the top is very easy to push over.

 

You could make it 13" front to back,and slide the tank to the back leaving a 3" flat space in front of the tank, and put a 50 lb bag of sand in the bottom of the stand, and then it would be a lot more stable (you would need to pull on the top of the stand with about 60 lbs of force to pull it over)

 

Interesting, thanks for your response, I will have a 5.5g sump at the bottom of the stand ( more force at the bottom) so that will help (that can replace your suggestion of the bag of sand).

 

 

I might reduce the height of the stand from 35" to 32" now that I think about this....

 

Thanks!

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I have built quite a few book cases and stands in the past which are usually tippy, especially when empty. What I do with almost every book case, is I will find a stud (or 2 depending on size) and iwill screw a small piec of cable to the wall and to the cabinet in a place out of site, but as close to the top as possible. don't really want much or any slack in the cable. Since it won't tip far enough to get any real weight on the cable, it does not need to be real thick either. Just an idea, hope it helps

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