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how to fight Red Slime Algae(Cyanobacteria)?


shingo43

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Wow did red slime remover kill your mom or something? People might actually listen to you if you broke down his argument intelligently, instead of like a nerd raging 12 year old.

Aren't you 36? What kind of question is that...did slime remover kill my mom? Glad someone took the high road of maturity. lol

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All of these things have a right way and a wrong way of approaching. The answer almost never comes in a bottle.

 

 

hahahahahha sure thing

I think you my friend are wrong. Have you ever tried?

 

84285209.jpg

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Aren't you 36? What kind of question is that...did slime remover kill my mom? Glad someone took the high road of maturity. lol

im convinced thats the case...

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  • 3 weeks later...
This isn't about an exchange of ideas. You don't understand how you failed so hard because you never bothered to do any research yourself. Low flow??? lollolol I would love to hear how you explain the causes of cyano accumulation without being able to Google it first.

 

Chemicals are a last ditch effort once your entire failbox is covered in cyano and you are about to lose every single frag you bought before your system was anywhere near mature. You are either extremely new to this yourself or have just had ####ty habits the entire time.

 

I'm sorry mate, but you are an incredible idiot, and people like you will lead to the detriment of our society.

Why those such as yourself cannot except that other methods of treatment worked for other people, I will never understand. I can tell you right now and without any doubt that there will be people with more experience on this thread than you, sometimes the answer to a problem doesn't come naturally, you have to use chemical intervention to keep things stable in the tank. If there was a natural answer to keeping the tank perfectly stable, then why do people dose - instead of finding an easier way to do this? Hmm?

I suggest you get your f***ing ignorant arse off this thread, and never come back. Things may be able to be sorted out in a more helpful and benefical way than your, frankly moronic way of dealing with things. Thanks.

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wrasseWrangler

OP,

 

I battled a cyano issue for 3 months. I tried everything..

 

stopped feeding for two weeks...

Did 30% water changes every week...

Increased the flow to where the flesh of my SPS almost was ripped off...

Reduced my light cycle to 4 hours a day...

 

Absolutely nothing slowed it down.

 

Got some red slime remover and my tank has never looked better. It has been gone for 3 months now and have not seen a single spot come back. Every one will have and opionion and they all usually stink. I would normally agree that chemicals are a quick fix. However, with cyano it is a different story. Save yourself the trouble and get the chem, you will be very happy.

 

 

 

Dose Coral Snow once a week for a month and it will be gone. DO NOT use RED SLIME REMOVER its an antibiotic and will KILL ALL the bacteria in your tank and reset the cycle.

 

KZ-NRS-CS250.jpg

 

HAHAHA this is the stupidest thing I have ever heard..... :lol:

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read other posts.. flow and water changes..

 

chemicals as last resort.. Don't expect to wake up the next morning after starting to see it all gone.. When it happens it is almost an overnight process.. But it does not happen the first night

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wrasseWrangler
read other posts.. flow and water changes..

 

chemicals as last resort.. Don't expect to wake up the next morning after starting to see it all gone.. When it happens it is almost an overnight process.. But it does not happen the first night

 

+1

 

After starting you will see it all go probably day 2. However the flow suggestion, that really does nothing. Actually the high flow just moves it around the tank getting it to root in other areas faster.

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+1

 

After starting you will see it all go probably day 2. However the flow suggestion, that really does nothing. Actually the high flow just moves it around the tank getting it to root in other areas faster.

 

 

i just switched to the phoenix 14k over the stock fishneedit bulb, i also added a clownfish last night. today after work i just noticed some slime starting to creep up. i am going to stick with manual removal and change out my chemi-pure, its about that time. hopefully it wont get out of hand, it seems it likes the phoenix bulb. i have only fed the tank 3 times in its existence, but i did notice a chunk of nori inside of my koralia ( i missed it) so that had to add to the nutrient spike some. But really flow does nothing? that's news to me. i'm not disputing you though, i would like to see evidence that supports high flow actually does do something. i always thought it might be bs.

 

and to the OP, at least it's not dinoflagellates. that #### nuked my last tank. it sucked.

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Just have patience and if you don't have a CUC, add one or add more to the existing one you have and those will help rid of it. Other than that, the cyano should go away on it's own over time. Use a turkey baster to get some off of the rock and siphon as much suspended algae as you can.

 

Other than that, you could use a power filter temporarily to help clear the tank of suspended matter during your water change as well.

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I'm sorry mate, but you are an incredible idiot, and people like you will lead to the detriment of our society.

Why those such as yourself cannot except that other methods of treatment worked for other people, I will never understand. I can tell you right now and without any doubt that there will be people with more experience on this thread than you, sometimes the answer to a problem doesn't come naturally, you have to use chemical intervention to keep things stable in the tank. If there was a natural answer to keeping the tank perfectly stable, then why do people dose - instead of finding an easier way to do this? Hmm?

I suggest you get your f***ing ignorant arse off this thread, and never come back. Things may be able to be sorted out in a more helpful and benefical way than your, frankly moronic way of dealing with things. Thanks.

lol @ lead to the detriment of our society.

 

Lots of people have more experience than me and that's terrific, and you're right: sometimes we look outside of nature for some problems. Cyano isn't one of them. You can say you done all the right things and ended up just dosing up the tank and most people will take you at face value. I am confident that this is almost never the case. It's not some mythical substance that no one knows anything about and has no idea how to mitigate. There is article after article readily available that describes, in detail, how to rid an aquarium of it. Beginners ought to be doing the leg work and getting it right the first time and not juice up their tank with a five minute cure that is nothing other than a replacement for proper husbandry. Chemiclean isn't the future of reefing; it's been around forever. It was a crutch way back then and is still a crutch now. However, if you cannot fathom how dosing things like calcium is any different than using Chemiclean I'd say you have a lot to learn yourself. So long as you're being frank, retard.

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I tried everything else I could research but chemical warfare and failed. I finally tried Boyd's chemi-clean (even the name sounds nasty) and in 2 days the tank has never looked better.

 

There may be some aquarists here that are so good they can fix their tank problems in a month with regular wc's - but for the rest of us the occasional and proper use of a well documented chemical can be a real time saver!!

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wrasseWrangler

I think our knowledge about cyano is very limited. I have a friend that just set up a new tank. Dry rock, dry sand and a brand new never used tank and equipment. Second month of his cycle he started to develop cyano. There is no possible way someone can say his was due to bad husbandry or excess nutrients... In his case chemi clean was an absolute must to rid the tank of it. It is good for beginers to do the "leg work" or they can learn from our experience and use chemi clean.... ;)

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I think our knowledge about cyano is very limited. I have a friend that just set up a new tank. Dry rock, dry sand and a brand new never used tank and equipment. Second month of his cycle he started to develop cyano. There is no possible way someone can say his was due to bad husbandry or excess nutrients...

 

Where did the water come from? If he bought the water, nutrients came in from the LFS. If he mixed it they came in from the salt mix. Phosphates could have leached in from plastic containers... there are too many other factors besides the rock and sand.

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Where did the water come from? If he bought the water, nutrients came in from the LFS. If he mixed it they came in from the salt mix. Phosphates could have leached in from plastic containers... there are too many other factors besides the rock and sand.

 

it's Dr. Malcolm's law. life finds a way, nature will find a way. didn't you see Jurassic Park? geeze

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it's Dr. Malcolm's law. life finds a way, nature will find a way. didn't you see Jurassic Park? geeze

 

Haha. Yeah. And there are lots of nasty things that seem to float hundreds and thousands of miles in the air. Check out some of the articles about sand from the Sahara Desert floating down in the middle of the arctic and stuff. Crazy. That could be where the cyano came from. The desert ;)

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removing all the algae with hard scrubbing and a 100% water change always made it easy to beat for me.

It wouldn't come back as strong in freshly mixed water which I presume had to be low in phosphates...it took a couple rounds, but in siphoning it all out and associating that with a full water change there came a point it did not come back. I kept up the water changes too

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Manual removal, cleaning the sand, and a GFO reactor has been beneficial for my removal. I almost had 100% sand coverage and then I started cleaning the sand and removing it manually as well as running GFO. I have mangroves now too, but they don't have leaves yet so they aren't pulling up very much phosphates. In case anyone didn't know, cyanobacteria only need phosphates, they fix can fix their own nitrogen so they don't need a nitrate/trite/ammonia source. If it wasn't so ugly, cyanobacteria is a really neat organism.

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omg look. Two separate individuals that took the time to do things correctly and likely learned a lot in the process. Like I did. Like prob thousands have.

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HecticDialectics

Right on Holdorf

 

in my very very first tank I had cyano that I got rid of using chemiclean. worked great, but i learned nothing about nutrient control so i then got a tank full of hair algae :lol:

 

Lesson: always better to address the real cause of the problem rather than finding a band-aid solution.

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when in fact a 100 percent water change is called for, what seems to be the best method for keeping the stock happy? i am genuinely curious.

 

edit: boo chemicals

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I had a lot of cyano sometime ago!!! i used red slim remover and it works for some time, but it came again and again, so i stop lisent my LFS and started to lisent the people here!!!

 

I dosed one last dose of chemiclean (in order to gain control over it) performed a large water change two days after that and i started to control my nutrients, every time i see some cyano growing i manually removed it, used phosguard and phosE and lot of GAC i changed my skimmer and started to wet skimming by the way my cyano was de red one but i had the black one too.

 

i sitll have some grows of the black one but is a minor problem that i am sure it will away sooner or later.

 

my logic tolds me that if the red slim remover kills the cyano the dead bacteria has to go somewhere, if i have nutrients in my system, the dead bacteria is going to release new nutrients to the system so i could think at the end i will end without cyano but with more nutrients and of course the cyano is going to come back and stronger!!

 

if you take my advice dont use red slim remover unless you are going to use it just to gain some control over the cyano (you could do the same just manually removing it and now i think it could be a better way) but you are still going to have to fight the root of the problem the nutrients if i learned something in this hobby is that the nutrient control is the solution for any algae problem and the cyano is half bacteria half algae!!!

 

good luck

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