Jump to content

Thinning out corals...


Grape Nuts

Recommended Posts

I have done a little searching but can't find the information I am looking for. Thinning out corals to avoid overcrowding seems to be part of the maintenance ritual of the successful reefer. But is the thinning done mainly for the "look" of the reef and to trade frags? Or is the thinning necessary to avoid battles between species that could result in death and parameters shifting? Hypothetically, if you were only growing one species of coral, and you never thinned it, and let it take over the tank, what harm would come if any?

 

Thanks, Ron

Link to comment
skimlessinseattle

If your talking about SPS, overgrowth would impede water flow creating many dead spots leading to deteriorating coral health and eventual death in those spots. Light also becomes another issue as branches begin to shade other branches.

 

If your talking about soft corals, I have seen it done with xenia and anthelia. The tank ends up looking like a shag carpet.

 

In either case, you end up with monospeciesuglyitis.

Link to comment
If your talking about SPS, overgrowth would impede water flow creating many dead spots leading to deteriorating coral health and eventual death in those spots. Light also becomes another issue as branches begin to shade other branches.

 

If your talking about soft corals, I have seen it done with xenia and anthelia. The tank ends up looking like a shag carpet.

 

In either case, you end up with monospeciesuglyitis.

 

As a child of the 70's I sorta like shag carpet...

Thanks for info.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...