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Soldering a "monunted style" led


YouKnowBlev

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Please indulge me.

 

I'm new to soldering and truthfully have no idea how to solder the wire onto my crees. What's the best technique? I went through 6 pages after searching for "soldering" and all the instructions and tips were vague (ie-take your time, use a hot iron, etc..) I'm looking for "to-the-point" instructions.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Please indulge me.

 

I'm new to soldering and truthfully have no idea how to solder the wire onto my crees. What's the best technique? I went through 6 pages after searching for "soldering" and all the instructions and tips were vague (ie-take your time, use a hot iron, etc..) I'm looking for "to-the-point" instructions.

 

Thanks in advance.

hope this helps

I found that link in a post by evilc66.

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That's a good primer. Soldering something that pulls a lot of heat away, like the MCPCBs the LEDs are mounted to, and large heatsinks, makes things a little more difficult. Getting an iron that has a high wattage helps (40W or more). The higher the wattage, the quicker the iron can get the area needed to be soldered hot enough to melt the solder. You will want to tin the pad and the wire, then solder the two together. It takes some practice. Also, getting good solder helps too. Don't get lead free/silver bearing/low temp solder. It's garbage, and makes things a lot harder for what we are doing. Get 60/40 rosin core solder.

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Pads won't be "slippery" to solder in that way. There may be some contaminant that was preventing the solder from taking. Roughing the surface is a good idea though to help with bonding, but not because it's slippery ;)

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I don't know if they still make it, but the best solder I've ever used is sold at radio control car shops, under the name Deans Racing Solder. Its a silver solder, but not like the new lead-free stuff that doesn't work worth a flip. I've had nothing but excellent results with it. And +1 for sure on a high-wattage iron, the heatsink you have the LEDs mounted to suck up the heat fast.

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Deans silver solder is good, but a little expensive for what you get. 60/40 is plenty good. 63/37 is ideal for electronics, but not all Radioshacks stock it. Mine has the tag for it, but never seems to have it in.

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Thanks for the replies...

 

 

So the plan of attack for these things is to get the plate hot (after tinning things up) and then apply the wire and solder?

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Hopefully this will help. Get a little flux. Put a bit on the pad and the wire to be joined. I know the flux is a bit redundant, but it helps. Then heat the pad and add a bit of solder. Do the same with the wire. This is called presoldering. Then put the wire on top of the solder puddle on the pad. Hod the iron ontop of the wire. The heat will evenly heat the pad and wire, thus the wire will fall into the little puddle and you have a bright joint. Keep in mind if the solder isnt shiny when your finished your iron was not hot enough.

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Hopefully this will help. Get a little flux. Put a bit on the pad and the wire to be joined. I know the flux is a bit redundant, but it helps. Then heat the pad and add a bit of solder. Do the same with the wire. This is called presoldering. Then put the wire on top of the solder puddle on the pad. Hod the iron ontop of the wire. The heat will evenly heat the pad and wire, thus the wire will fall into the little puddle and you have a bright joint. Keep in mind if the solder isnt shiny when your finished your iron was not hot enough.

 

 

Perfect!

 

Thanks.

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This is exactly what I was looking for. I just mounted my LED's today using nanotuner.com thermal pads. Tomorrow morning my plan of attack is to get all the LED's wired.

 

Great info, but is flux necessary? My dad was telling me it helps make the solder so it doesn't bead up.

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Flux isnt really necessary if your using rosin core style solder. It will however make soldering much more easier if your not use to doing the task. I've been soldering for over 20 years and still find it a lifesaver from time to time. Your father is correct, it makes it easier for the solder to lay out into the joints surface.

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