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Water Changes?


makonut

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Everyone:

 

I recently responded to another persons post about water changes and I suggested using saltwater that has been aged (>1 day) after mixing before being added as I have observed that the pH and salinity readings are more stable after a day. But, several people responded that they do not let it age, so it made me think that it is not critical with regards to water change. One good comment is that this is conventional wisdom regarding the aging, but there does not seem to be any reason why.

 

Of course there are factors that may affect this, such as frequency of water change, amount being changed, but I would like to know if the majority of people skip the aging or is there cases where it should be properly aged before adding?

 

Thanks for any information on this question.

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mako,

 

My reply from the other thread:

 

Thanks for your reply. I don't think you're wrong and it works for you. I usually let mine sit for 24 hours with a heater and powerhead, that works for me. But, I'm not convinced it makes that much difference, I've never tested to see. I only questioned you to see if you had an answer. I see too many people give that advice only because that's what they've been told. I didn't mean any disrespect to you, you obviously have a reason. :)
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I do not age my water unless I mix it up then forget or don't have time to do the change.

 

I don't find that it is needed. Your salt will buffer the water for PH and using a strong pump will also help. The temp comes up quickly with a heater or two and the salt disolvels in a few hours or faster.

 

A few hours of mixing works for me

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I mix my water it an insulated jug the night before. So it ages about 12-16hrs before I use it. I have an extra pump in there running all night and it actually warms the water up to the right temp for me. Kinda nifty. I am not sure if it something you have to do though. I do it because I have read you should. Interested to know why also.

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Doesn't matter, ime. Although some salts aren't completely clear until they have had a chance to mix for a bit.

 

Also, some salts incorporate agents that raise the water's surface tension. This can cause issues with microbubbles staying intact longer and making their way into the main display in systems with skimmers. That doesn't apply to all salts though.

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I seem to remember another thread pertaining to this. I believe lgreen, Mr. Fosi, Mr. A and several others were involved. If I remember correctly, there was quite a bit of science content in it. Anyone know where that thread is, I couldn't find it when I searched yesterday.

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I think that the aging rule is to allow out gassing

 

I think of chlorine, if you are using tap water

 

My theory is that this is an old "rule" and it stuck around after people stopped using tap water in their reef tanks (just a theory...)

 

 

 

if you are using RO i dont think this rule really doesn't apply

 

all you need is enough time to get the temp right and make sure it is mixed properly

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I usually just start the mix the night before just as going to bed. Let is mix overnigt and ready whenever I get to it the next day. No real "science" behind it, but I too always heard the aging thing. So I developed the routine and it works well for me. I just like having it ready cause I only have brief moments here and there to get it done and don't want to wait on the salt to mix (got 2 kiddos and one on the way)

Jon

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I found this thread, possibly the one scott is referring to:

http://www.nano-reef.com/forums/index.php?...c=80838&hl=

 

Also, this quote from tinyreef might be more accurate:

 

the waiting period many recommend may have been from the fact that many old salt mixes, well, didn't mix very well. the addt'l time to let them dissolve help prevent actual salt grains from falling onto anything in the tank.
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The Propagator

Aging is not so much for gassiouse exchange in general, but more so to let all the salt dissolve fully. You'll need to let it sit for at least an hour to dissolve the salts fully even in the rapid mixes, and more for those with crystals remaining after the initial mix and 20 minute wait or so.

If you don't then those salt crystals will free float right on to your coral and burn the snot out of them , OR IN to their mouths as food and burn the snot out of them.

IMHO its always best to let it sit for an hour or two with a pump circulating, and an air stone.

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Everyone:

 

Thanks for the replies.

 

It appears that everyone does continuously mix or let the mixed water sit some time before adding it to the tank, but the time from mixing to adding is less then a day. As Prop and others pointed out, it allows the salt crystals to fully dissolve and the salt water properties to stabilize. While not a controlled study, I think the information will help people in the future.

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I do not age my water unless I mix it up then forget or don't have time to do the change.

 

I don't find that it is needed. Your salt will buffer the water for PH and using a strong pump will also help. The temp comes up quickly with a heater or two and the salt disolvels in a few hours or faster.

 

A few hours of mixing works for me

 

 

ditto

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My schedule to change water will let the water sitting for 2 or 3 days, but from my personal view, I don't think it's a great issue to let the water sitting hours or days, especially when we use RO/DI water.

 

Now I have 225g +250g water tanks and switch/store ocean water by the way... crazy right?? so everything going the natural way :)

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ReefCrawler:

 

Have you ever tested the Nitrates, Calcium, and pH of the ocean water you are using?

 

Curious how natural ocean water you get is versus artificial?

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I mix mine 12-24hrs before hand just because of convince but I have heard that "experts" recommended this because some brands of sea salts contain trace amounts of ammonia (lower than many test kits can register) and is a problem with very sensitive and delicate animals

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ph is off the charts with fresh mixed saltwater. i use a pump with venturi and let it run a few hours.

 

i exprienced the same thing when 1st mixed...ph off charts...tested next day and was fine.

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