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Innovative Marine Aquariums

30Long?


rbrusletto

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All - Saturday morning while cruising around, we found a good deal.. Used tank, needed some cleanup, 36" Wide(left to right) x 16" Tall(top to bottom) x 12 Deep(front to back)

 

Tank capacity is somewhere just over 30 gallons.. I wasn't exactly sure what this would be considered, is it a long tank? Or does that require it to be wider and not as "tall".

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Chupacabras

That's just a 30 gallon; the 33 is a four foot tank.

 

The 30 breeder will sometimes be called a long since it's shallow like the 20 long. For some reason, people are starting to call the 29 gallon a 30 tall, which may be confusing matters.

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avalanche1201
That's just a 30 gallon; the 33 is a four foot tank.

 

The 30 breeder will sometimes be called a long since it's shallow like the 20 long. For some reason, people are starting to call the 29 gallon a 30 tall, which may be confusing matters.

 

I see 40 breeder tanks everywhere...what makes it a breeder? is there a difference between a standard 40?

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formerly icyuodd/icyoud2

depending on the company 30g standard aquariums range from

 

30x18x12 to 36x16x12 so it is longer than some 30g aquariums. :)

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depending on the company 30g standard aquariums range from

 

30x18x12 to 36x16x12 so it is longer than some 30g aquariums. :)

 

 

 

I think I'll call it the 30AlmostLong

 

case solved

 

thanks errbody...

 

oh yeah, I bought it. water tested and will be starting a new thread shortly

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I see 40 breeder tanks everywhere...what makes it a breeder? is there a difference between a standard 40?

 

"Breeder" tanks are typically shallower (from top to bottom) and wider (front to back) than "standard" tanks of the same volume. The larger footprint allowed heavier stocking densities than standard tanks, which was of more use to breeders.

 

Before we had so much "fancy schmanzy" equipment the surface area for gas exchange was much more critical to our stocking than it is today. ;)

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avalanche1201
"Breeder" tanks are typically shallower (from top to bottom) and wider (front to back) than "standard" tanks of the same volume. The larger footprint allowed heavier stocking densities than standard tanks, which was of more use to breeders.

 

Before we had so much "fancy schmanzy" equipment the surface area for gas exchange was much more critical to our stocking than it is today. ;)

 

hmm. interesting, thanks alot kismetsh

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