cnseekatz

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About cnseekatz

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  • Birthday July 23

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    Irvine, CA

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  1. Haha... yeah, they're busy. Mine doesn't dig anymore... unless I destroy his tunnels during a rescape or something. But at the beginning, yeah, they're like the VC.
  2. Mine is anywhere from 2" to none... depending on who's been digging where! I would say a 1" average bed is probably fine. As long as they can find or create a burrow in which they'll feel comfy.
  3. Best buds... the wrasse follows the diamond goby around everywhere, picking at all the junk he kicks up as he sifts the sand.
  4. That I don't know. The only other shrimp I've kept in there with him were peppermints, which were only in there for short periods of time. I never saw him bother one, but I wouldn't take that as gospel. Personally, I wouldn't trust him with any shrimp smaller than him. I think if he feels like he can eat it, he'll probably go for it... I feed him freeze dried shrimp all the time, and he loves 'em (that's what I gave him in that video)!
  5. Alpheus is the genus. Yours is a different species... I think yours is red?
  6. Bullseye Snapping Shrimp (Alpheus soror) I found this cool little guy at my LFS about a year ago, and after some quick Googling, I bought it. It's a fascinating little creature, and surprisingly, I've never seen another one at a fish store, or in anyone else's tank blogs. Given how beautiful it is, and how (mostly) reef safe it seems to be, I figured I'd do a short write up to spread awareness about the Bullseye Snapping Shrimp. Alpheus soror is a beautiful golden color with vibrant purple/blue legs and claws. For anyone who has owned an azule damsel, you know the exact color combination. He is a pistol shrimp, and has a lot of the same characteristics and behaviors as other pistols, with a few major differences. They are burrowers and tunnel-builders, but unlike most of the pistol shrimp we see in this hobby, they don't seem to bond with gobies. For whatever reason, the Bullseye is a solitary figure. Whether it's causation or correlation, it seems to be much more active and bold than other pistol shrimp. He is constantly on the move, has an extensive network of tunnels spanning the entire length of my tank (3' across). He has become bolder the longer he's been in my tank, and I see him often now, and not just poking out of tunnels, but creeping around on the base of my rockwork as well. He doesn't have a goby to keep him safe, or to help feed him, so he's out and about all the time. He's an avid scavenger, and does an amazing job cleaning up uneaten food. His burrows have allowed improved water movement underneath my rocks and he stirs up a lot of detritus while he goes about his business. Another interesting trait is the "snapping" part, which is shockingly loud (I hear him snapping from across the room with the TV on). As Live Aquaria puts it, "The sound it makes comes from an appendage on the pincher which moves when the pincher is opened or closed and water is ejected." Check out the little video below, if you turn your sound up, you can hear him snapping at my forceps. He is listed as reef safe, though after a year of observing him, I can add a few caveats to that statement. First, I've never seen him go after any corals, hard or soft. He doesn't go after snails or fish, but I have seen him go after hermit crabs who get too close. He won't kill them, but he'll snap at them ferociously, and even attack them. The attack doesn't accomplish a lot, but he'll shake the shell for a few seconds and then both will retreat to their respective corners. For the most part, he's a good citizen in my reef tank. The one major BUT is in regards to, surprisingly enough... gobies! Seeing as he is a loner, he does not take kindly to anyone who tries to invade his tunnels. I've attempted several gobies and blennies over the past year, and they always end with the same result. These fish, who either burrow themselves, or just enjoy a nice cave under a rock, inevitably find a nice pre-made tunnel and try to make themselves at home. Only problem is that when the Bullseye catches them in his house, he charges them, and snaps... The fish, who weren't expecting such rudeness freak out, fly out of the burrow, and then out of the tank. I've only seen it happen once, when I was fortunate enough to rescue the carpet surfer, but unfortnately it's happened multiple times, with multiple species of bottom dwelling gobies and blennies while I was not around to stop it. He is clearly not compatible with bottom dwelling gobies and blennies. Not because he wants to eat them, but because he defends his turf, and it leads to jumping. Keep in mind, my tank is only 45 gallons, so with a larger tank, and more territory, one might have success... though it's safe to say, the shrimp and fish won't be living harmoniously together. In summary, this is a gorgeous, unique shrimp, who is really engaging and fun to have in your tank. He provides the typical benefits of a scavenging shrimp, with the same risks/rewards of a tunnel builder. They appear to be pretty rare in the hobby, so if you come across one, I encourage you to pick him up... unless of course, you house any kind of shrimp gobies, or sand-sifting gobies, or bottom dwelling blennies... because it's likely to end badly.
  7. Bullseye Snapping Shrimp (Alpheus soror) I found this cool little guy at my LFS about a year ago, and after some quick Googling, I bought it. It's a fascinating little creature, and surprisingly, I've never seen another one at a fish store, or in anyone else's tank blogs. Given how beautiful it is, and how (mostly) reef safe it seems to be, I figured I'd do a short write up to spread awareness about the Bullseye Snapping Shrimp. Alpheus soror is a beautiful golden color with vibrant purple/blue legs and claws. For anyone who has owned an azule damsel, you know the exact color combination. He is a pistol shrimp, and has a lot of the same characteristics and behaviors as other pistols, with a few major differences. They are burrowers and tunnel-builders, but unlike most of the pistol shrimp we see in this hobby, they don't seem to bond with gobies. For whatever reason, the Bullseye is a solitary figure. Whether it's causation or correlation, it seems to be much more active and bold than other pistol shrimp. He is constantly on the move, has an extensive network of tunnels spanning the entire length of my tank (3' across). He has become bolder the longer he's been in my tank, and I see him often now, and not just poking out of tunnels, but creeping around on the base of my rockwork as well. He doesn't have a goby to keep him safe, or to help feed him, so he's out and about all the time. He's an avid scavenger, and does an amazing job cleaning up uneaten food. His burrows have allowed improved water movement underneath my rocks and he stirs up a lot of detritus while he goes about his business. Another interesting trait is the "snapping" part, which is shockingly loud (I hear him snapping from across the room with the TV on). As Live Aquaria puts it, "The sound it makes comes from an appendage on the pincher which moves when the pincher is opened or closed and water is ejected." Check out the little video below, if you turn your sound up, you can hear him snapping at my forceps. He is listed as reef safe, though after a year of observing him, I can add a few caveats to that statement. First, I've never seen him go after any corals, hard or soft. He doesn't go after snails or fish, but I have seen him go after hermit crabs who get too close. He won't kill them, but he'll snap at them ferociously, and even attack them. The attack doesn't accomplish a lot, but he'll shake the shell for a few seconds and then both will retreat to their respective corners. For the most part, he's a good citizen in my reef tank. The one major BUT is in regards to, surprisingly enough... gobies! Seeing as he is a loner, he does not take kindly to anyone who tries to invade his tunnels. I've attempted several gobies and blennies over the past year, and they always end with the same result. These fish, who either burrow themselves, or just enjoy a nice cave under a rock, inevitably find a nice pre-made tunnel and try to make themselves at home. Only problem is that when the Bullseye catches them in his house, he charges them, and snaps... The fish, who weren't expecting such rudeness freak out, fly out of the burrow, and then out of the tank. I've only seen it happen once, when I was fortunate enough to rescue the carpet surfer, but unfortnately it's happened multiple times, with multiple species of bottom dwelling gobies and blennies while I was not around to stop it. He is clearly not compatible with bottom dwelling gobies and blennies. Not because he wants to eat them, but because he defends his turf, and it leads to jumping. Keep in mind, my tank is only 45 gallons, so with a larger tank, and more territory, one might have success... though it's safe to say, the shrimp and fish won't be living harmoniously together. In summary, this is a gorgeous, unique shrimp, who is really engaging and fun to have in your tank. He provides the typical benefits of a scavenging shrimp, with the same risks/rewards of a tunnel builder. They appear to be pretty rare in the hobby, so if you come across one, I encourage you to pick him up... unless of course, you house any kind of shrimp gobies, or sand-sifting gobies, or bottom dwelling blennies... because it's likely to end badly.
  8. I'm triggered by this.
  9. Nice, glad to see it's working for the GHA.
  10. Someone in San Diego. Probably going to try to pick them up and save myself the shipping!
  11. I went a little bonkers on eBay last night. Oh well...
  12. As long as you get the little hermits (think about 1" or less) they're perfectly harmless. Regarding the flow, you'll just have to play around with it. At this stage, the pattern of the flow is not going to be as important as the amount. You want to make sure that there aren't any "dead" spots in the tank, where there's no flow, and debris can accumulate.
  13. I only name the ones I don't want to live longer than 2 weeks.