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Subsea

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About Subsea

  • Rank
    subsea
  • Birthday 05/29/1948

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  • Website
    http://www.AquacultureRanch.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Austin, Tx
  • Interests
    Hunting, fishing and reefing. At present, I have over 7000 gallons in salt water. At the end of Feb, I will have a grand opening for AquacultureRanch. Macro and live rock will be my mainstay.

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  1. Subsea

    25yr old 75G Jaubert Plenum

    @Romana what would you you like to learn.? I could not find a tank journal. Have you started your cube, yet"?
  2. Subsea

    25yr old 75G Jaubert Plenum

    I would discontinue use of skimmer with no socks on flow in sump, I would place eggcrate in sump to provide surface area for biofilms for pods or sponges. If you wish to make this a pod refugium, it would work well. If you wish to make this a cryptic refugium, it would work to recycle nutrients and feed coral. To remove nutrients, use macro, either in chaeto reactor or in ATS.
  3. Subsea

    25yr old 75G Jaubert Plenum

    It sounds as if a chaeto reactor or an ATS is what you need with your space limitation. Neither produces live food, but they remove nutrients.
  4. Subsea

    25yr old 75G Jaubert Plenum

    Remove nutrients or recycle nutrients, that is the question. A protein skimmer removes nutrients mostly in the form of bacteria. Refugiums are not designed to remove nutrients. Just like a mature sand bed, refugiums process inorganic & organic nutrients to grow live food for tank inhabitants. If you prune and remove macro, then you export nutrients from system. Refugiums grow coral and feed fish. Protein skimmers strip bacteria from the water column and remove food (nutrient export). Which of those two does your system need? IMO, the only consistently good thing about protein skimmers is they provide good air exchange and increase redox values.
  5. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    That nasty stuff removes food that grows coral. Think of being skimmerless this way; instead of removing skimmate for nutrient export, grow more coral to frag & sell for nutrient export.
  6. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    @tibbsy07 Thank you for the great details. It lessens some of my logic on using UV sterilizer for short circuiting the “microbial loop”. However, the big reason is algae spores. I run ornamental macro algae mixed garden lagoons. Macro algae is often coated with biofilms and nuisance algae which bring in competing spores. Thus UV sterilizer.
  7. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    I remember a conversation some years ago in which I asked your thoughts on bacteria and uv sterilizer, “gumbo” is what I heard. Yesterday, in a thread with Randy Holmes Farley, he said “spill their guts” with respect to uv and bacteria. I have mature reef tanks in which I feed heavy and add ammonia. From your experience with micro biology, do you think that bacteria nutrients after uv “spilled their guts” can be assimilated by corals directly?
  8. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    That much water weighs about 400 pounds. On my first marine tank, I took out back seat of a VW bug, put two empty 30G containers and collected water on an incoming tide at Galveston jetties, where I also collected Peppermint Shrimp and Curly Que Anemone. NSW is rich in phyto and food for corals. I kept it fresh with air pump and used it the same day.
  9. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    I use a heavy knife and break thin shell. At that point, scape fleash from both halves.
  10. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    Harvesting is fun. I enjoyed collection trips with the kids. We would m@ke a picknic of it. I focus on in tank live food webs. I do not feed fish; I overfeed the system, but first I invest in micro fauna and fana to inoculate diverse food webs in the sandbed.
  11. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    When 25 year old Jaubert Plenum sand-bed crashed, due to aggressive predatation of sand bed detrivores by Melanarious Wrasse, I turned out the lights in 30G EcoSystem Mud/Macro refugium and went cryptic refugium 8 months ago. Picture today after eight months. Chile Coral likes cryptic refugium.
  12. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    @tibbsy07 Tell me about the nano box in your signature. Inquiring minds want to know.
  13. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    I recently read a paper about coral nutrition on a wild reef which emphasized that 60% of reef food was tied up in the “microbial loop”. Bacteria move nutrients from one food web to another. Previously, I considered bacteria and algae as my biofilter, I now include cryptic sponges as the third leg of biofiltration.
  14. Subsea

    Natural Filtration

    Brent, Thank you for the observation of the horse and the bird, unusual. For certain, with respect to generalizations there are usually more exceptions then the rule. First tank was 55G with undergravel filter. Substrate was crushed up oyster shells from the chicken feed store. I collected peppermint shrimp and condalactis Anemone on the jetties in Galveston. In the grass flats were ghost shrimp, green mollies, and Sheepshead minnows. First live rock was an oyster cluster with numerous “fans a waving”. Years later, I was bragging about the dark burgundy mat on my substrate. This friend was an experienced reefer and he blurted out, “You mean the cynobacteria”. I said what is cyno? I have come a long way since those “ignorance is bliss” days.
  15. Subsea

    Keeping a natural reef

    @tibbsy07 Do you still use the phrase “Microbial Overlords”? I so much like that, I use it as often as I can.
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