MeepNand

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About MeepNand

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    Journeyman Tinker
  • Birthday April 13

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Cupertino, CA
  • Interests
    Poison dart frogs, carnivorous plants, jungle plants, cephalopods, seahorses, electronics, programming microcontrollers, mechanical stuff, gears, soldering, and more!

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  1. Yes you can, but you may need to change some of the pin assignments to suit the wiring you choose. You'll also need to wire up some buttons. If I had to do this again, I would change to regular parabolic settings and just make the user select max values for each channel and start and end times. To that end, you may be better off writing the program yourself.
  2. My experience is that macroalgaes are cheap and nice looking, and can thrive in a lot of light and flow requirements. They also suck up nitrates, which is nice.
  3. I have had tons of problems with CH340G arduinos. Some work, some don't, and I have never understood the reason why. In fact, I have a stack of about 4 Arduinos using CH340G chips that don't work right next to me at the moment. I would just return both and buy new ones that use FTDI chips; it's only about $1-2 more expensive even for the Mega versions on Ebay. Even the one that is working may mysteriously stop working. It's also worth noting that the CH340G chips have programs uploaded slower and seem to have slower Serial communications than the FTDI chips.
  4. So true. Of the 2000-line code, around 1000 is just displaying everything properly. SD card + loading pictures might be the solution to that, at least partially.
  5. SMS messaging sounds fairly difficult. Easier to do would be something like WiFi application. It looks like you can use an Arduino GSM shield: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/ArduinoGSMShield However, that would cost between $20-70 depending on where you buy from. The main problem I started running into with this project was a lack of pins. If you added one of those protoshields between the Mega and the TFT shield, then it's a lot easier to break out pins (no need to remove headers). I haven't done any major dev work on this project in what must be like 2 years (!!) now, but I do get paid in a few weeks so I might try and start working on it again. No promises though. I think there are many faults or lacks of features in today's reef controllers. For what they offer, most of them can be made with less than $30 in hardware for just the "brain" in quantity, and features like advanced weather are missing. I'm really not sure. I used to use the old UTFT library from Henning Karlsen, but I moved to the new library when I heard about it. The shield you linked is a little different from mine; it has an SD card slot and another IC on it. I vaguely remember the old UTFT library promising SD card support from those types of shields, so maybe it will work. Try leaving the code as-is first, then try the replacement line you are looking at (UTFT myGLCD(TFT01_32, 38,39,40,41)). If neither works we'll work through it.
  6. Meepduino 1.6 (and I believe 2.0) should be functional. If you're just looking at LEDs, anything from 1.3 upwards should have good features.
  7. Yes, but the display will be cropped to the 320x240 screen resolution, meaning it will only display in the top-left of your screen if you use a screen with a higher resolution than that. If you use a larger display with a 320x240 resolution, that should work fine.
  8. I've tried using the SD card on the TFT screens before, and it's rather tricky to get them to work (I haven't succeeded yet). Any updates?
  9. Good for you! Keep in mind the software doesn't suffer major performance decreases with the Mega, so if you can't get it working there shouldn't be a large performance hit. You will need EEPROM to save your settings from shutdown, as AFAIK you cannot write to flash from runtime. The Due may be different, but I haven't worked with it enough to know. If you do end up getting some working code, please PM me with it so I can add it to the first page.
  10. Dang, those weren't around last time I was here! I've designed for the A6211 in the past and got a board that was around $2.50 in components. I thought that a CPU power supply would be as good/bad as the 48v ones, is there any particular reason why they would have poor efficiency?
  11. I haven't posted in here in a long time, as I have been busy meditating in the mountains and training. But I noticed some nice LED driver ICs from Linear recently, and wanted to do some stuff with them, even though I don't have an aquarium right now. Linear offers a number of different options for their LED drivers, but most notable are the Buck-Boost style of drivers. Meanwell LDDs are Buck LED drivers, meaning that the input voltage must be higher than the output voltage. Buck-Boost allows the input voltage to be in a very wide range, with maximum efficeincy achieved near the LED string voltage (but still topping 90% efficiency in most cases). Essentially, this lets you use a cheap computer power supply instead of the usual expensive 36v or 48v supplies. A 12v 800w supply can run you around $25 compared to the usual $50+ for a 48v 10a supply. Boost LED drivers can also do this for a much lower price, but if you have <12v of LEDs, they won't work. Post below what you want to see in a driver. Specify things like # of LEDs or voltage, current, number of channels, and price. I can make these to be whatever you want it to, with any current rating and/or voltage rating with any input. Drivers should only cost around $5-8 for Boost or Buck drivers, or $8-15 for Buck-Boost LED drivers. Multi-channel drivers would cost more overall but less per channel. Drivers can be as little as $2.50, for something like a 28v 1A Buck driver. If anybody would like to test/obtain some LED driver boards, PM me. There will be some cost involved to purchase stuff, but I will see how much I can offset the costs with my own money. I'm not going to be doing this for profit, just for fun.
  12. Nothing to do while I wait for another DS1302, so it's time to start looking at the Boostled Typhon code. I'm thinking half-hour by half-hour control. I'll post any updates here. Updated 2/23/14. Features: -Bell curve option instead of straight line -255 dimming steps -Calculations each second -5 dimming settings per channel -Lighting test to preview different mixes of power -Acclimation mode from 0 to 60 days Download the INVERTED code if you are using buckpucks. Otherwise, the normal one below will do fine. Link to board layout: http://www.nano-reef.com/topic/328216-reprogramming-the-typhon/?p=4642901 To download: 1. Extract and drag the Typhon_Code_Meep folder to your "sketches" folder. Extract the DS1307 library in the extra_libraries folder to your libraries folder. 2. Open the Arduino program. 3. Open the sketch (inverted or normal) 4. Select COM port (Look in "Devices and printers" to find out the COM port of the Typhon) 5. Select "Arduino Duemilanove w/ Atmega328" from "Boards". 6. Attach the FTDI cable. The bottom of the FTDI will be facing up towards the LCD screen on the Typhon when you plug it in. 6. Hit upload. extra_libraries.zip Typhon_code_Meep.zip
  13. Another way to maintain flow is to use a drill and a paint stirring bit. Gives great flow in addition to air pumps, and is especially good for large tanks.
  14. Nice. Only seen a couple of those online.
  15. What IS that? It looks awesome.