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RayWhisperer

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About RayWhisperer

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    High society hillbilly & Honorary SCNRS member
  • Birthday 07/31/1971

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  1. Saltwater Vine?

    Everything I've read about it only says it's salt tolerant. As in it grows on the dunes, not out to the waters edge. I don't think it can root in Saltwater like a mangrove.
  2. Pearl coral always looks stringy

    That coral looks bleached. Pretty common with bubble corals. Regular feeding will usually do the trick.
  3. digitata losing fluorescence

    Yeah, accurate was the wrong word. Consistent would have been a better choice.
  4. Clown Fish and Anemone

    There is nothing going on with your clowns. About 90% of new clowns will go to a back corner, or a filter intake, or heater and stay there. I'm not sure if it's fear of a new environment, being taken out of the group they were in at the store, or just their natural hosting instinct. It's just what happens.
  5. digitata losing fluorescence

    Sorry, I was thinking in ppM. That makes what, 0.014 ppm? That's actually a pretty good number to be at. A bit higher is better. Comon logic would dictate the LPS would suffer, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Typical NSW values are around 0.005 ppm. LPS thrive there. NSW alk levels are pretty solid at 7 dkh. Quite frankly, I'm surprised you haven't experienced any alkalinity burn keeping the alk around 9. Assuming your phosphate is really undetectable. I'll take seabass' word on this phosphorus checker being fairly accurate. Honestly, I'm surprised (if not still skeptical) that a hobby grade test kit can measure that low.
  6. digitata losing fluorescence

    Sorry, I was thinking in ppM. That makes what, 0.014 ppm? That's actually a pretty good number to be at. A bit higher is better. Comon logic would dictate the LPS would suffer, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Typical NSW values are around 0.005 ppm. LPS thrive there.
  7. digitata losing fluorescence

    Sorry, I was thinking in ppM. That makes what, 0.014 ppm? That's actually a pretty good number to be at. A bit higher is better. Comon logic would dictate the LPS would suffer, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Typical NSW values are around 0.005 ppm. LPS thrive there.
  8. Clown Fish and Anemone

    Welcome to N-R. While a BTA is a relatively easy anemone, I'd suggest waiting until your tank matures some. Plus, it'll help you get some experience under your belt. Nobody here will tell you to buy a nem right off. Especially without knowing more about your tank. Especially the lights. As for your clowns. That sounds like normal behavior.
  9. digitata losing fluorescence

    14 ppb!?!? I guess that could be with a giant portion of the juice from the food in the sample... Try testing again in a half hour or so. See if it goes down. If it's still elevated into the ridiculous, I'd be suspect of that test kit. I'm going to go out on a limb, though. Reading through your replies, I don't think phosphate is your problem. I'm sure it's present, but probably in the 0.0something range. Easily within a good range for SPS.
  10. Potters Angel?

    Well, I had 5 African flamebacks in one tank. While the male did bully several other fish (especially the chromis), I attributed that to the constant breeding. None of them ever bothered coral. Other than an occasional nip I assumed was algae, as they did the same on the rock much more often. Same experience with coral beauties, though all of them were singles. The cherub was great for several months. Then I noticed a few bare spots on the poci. I didn't think much of it. Noticed it picking at it the next day. I wasn't going to try to net that little bastard out of a tank loaded with rock, besides, the colony was good sized, I figured a trim wouldn't hurt it. The "trim" became a buzz cut within a few days.
  11. Hitchhiker ID help needed

    It's aptasia. Go get some joes juice or aptasia x, turn the rock so you can get a clear shot at it, and feed it it's last meal.
  12. Potters Angel?

    While I've never had a potters, I've had several other types of Centropyge. All have been relatively well behaved with the exception of the cherub. That little bastard destroyed an entire colony of pocillopora. So, it's pretty much a YMMV situation when it comes to any Centropyge.
  13. digitata losing fluorescence

    I have no experience with the phosphorous checker from Hanna. I've used the phosphate checker, as well as the alkalinity checker, though. Both were proven useless when compared against Salifert. Three tests in a row, side by side. Salifert had consistent results, Hanna checkers varied wildly. I'm not claiming the Salifert was dead accurate. These are hobby grade tests, you'll only get extreme accuracy from a lab. So, I'll take consistency every time. I dont really know what to tell you. I doubt you have 0 ppb, though. If that were the case, you'd have very pale pastel colored SPS. As seabass and I said before, SPS browning is usually higher phosphate related. However, where something like an A. lokani might start to brown out at 0.05 monti's are generally much more forgiving. I've seen them showing color at 0.1 ppb and higher. Granted, those were the old days, when everyone had higher phosphates and had the alkalinity jacked up between 10 and 12 dkh. I don't know the true relationship, or if there even is one. I just know that the lower your phosphate is, the lower your alk needs to be, lest you burn all your corals. At this point, I'm just rambling, though... I'd guess your next step would be to verify your results. Try to find an LFS that uses a reliable test kit, and have them run a few phosphate tests. It may cost you $1 a test, but spending $3 to get the same results is better than spending $23 on a kit. If that proves good, your next place to start looking is light. Go diving on a reef. Most corals are brown and green. That's light spectrum. So, provided your phosphate is good, perhaps you have too much red in your lights. It might be worth a try to lower the intensity of your warm color channels and see if that gets you results.
  14. Bugs Rule

    Indiana, not Indians.
  15. Bugs Rule

    Obviously certain bacteria will outcompete others in a closed system. And yes, nitrifying bacteria are present in the air, dust and dirt all around us. Hell, bottled bacteria and dried bacteria for aquariums have been around and used for many years. I just figure Mother Nature is far better, and far more efficient. It's my opinion that a stepped introduction of both wild and captive strains from various sources makes for a better, more stable system. Xhunt, try ordering some sand from Tampa bay saltwater. Another option would be inland aquatics in Indians. Though I believe that'll be around $100, too.
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