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Would This Work?


Labguy

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I have a Rena XP2 cannister filter on my new 30 gallon tank. I was wondering if putting a small desk fan in the stand blowing on the cannister and return lines would cool the water a bit? My wife hates the AC on in the house just to keep the tank at the proper temp.

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SplitSequence

well, it may, but it may not be very noticable. That's not going to be very much heat transfer, through the plastic and whatnot.

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Nope. Plastic is a very poor conductor of energy (hot or cold) so all you will be doing is wasting electricity with your fan on. If you are concerned with heat, a small clip on fan on the side of the tank blowing between the top of he tank and the light will lower your temp a few degrees. Looks ghetto as hell, but works.

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as others have already stated, evaporative cooling is the way to go if you can't run the AC. however, keep in mind that fans can only cool so much below ambient air temp. if it is 100* in your house, chances are good that a fan isn't going to keep your tank from hitting 85*+

 

best bet is to buy a chiller...expensive initially, but worth it when you upgrade in a year or so. :)

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supersecretshinto

I don't know if you DIY at all, but i'm working on a "waste-water" chiller for mine. Since tap water runs a steady cold temp. regardless of season, I'm running some icemaker waterline spliced into a nearby cold water pipe to a small metal "radiator" or "coil" i will house in my sump. A needle valve will control the waterflow thru the coil to ajust the temp. The waste water you can route to a drain (preferably in the basement). Instead of running on electricity, it would run on water. I believe it should be equally cost effective to run and not much cost to build. Since you have no sump you could build an in-line version out of pvc or make another canister to house the unit. You could save alot of green, but I'm still convincing the spouse to let me drill the two small holes in the floor.

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Wow. That's a friggin good idea. Wish my building would let me do something like that...

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ProFlatlander15

I set up my stand with two fans (1 in, 1 out) to try and cool the water and didn't notice any difference.

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instead what you could do is make a sump/fuge instead of a canister filter and blow the fan in the sump

thatll keep the temps low

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Well it is not much but it does work to some extent. It is keeping the temp rock on at 80. It was not going above 82 I was just looking for something to make it stable. I do plan on a fuge in the stand eventually but this was a huge investment so it might take some time to get the fuge running.

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supersecretshinto

Since evaporative cooling strikes your fancy and you will have a sump at some point, how would you feel about making some sort of "ventilated trickle-tower" to cool things down. Here's a simple diagram to get my point across, but you could build it any way you want. I Basically use this configuration for my main filtration (minus the fan) and run about 4 degrees below ambient. Add a fan or two and maybe something to adjust it with and I bet that could be doubled easy. Maybe more....

 

I hear what you're saying about your tank being a huge investment. That's why when I finally decided to go saltwater I DIYed everything except for the tank itself! It's only 6 gallons, but I spent more money on lr and sand the day I fired it up than I did in construction. I only wish I could have gotten to you sooner. You'd have that sump and fuge already and probably some money left your pocket.

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