Jump to content
Premium Aquatics Aquarium Supplies

Hanna Tester Questions


Mohawk Mafia

Recommended Posts

Mohawk Mafia

Hey All,

 

Recently bought the G2 Max Nano Peninsula AIO and need to get some testers before it arrives. I am thinking The Hanna line because from what I have read they seem to be pretty decent testers. My first thoughts are these, calcium, salinity, Ph. Other ones are phosphate and alkalinity, but not sure how these would enhance my success rate. Any insights are always greatly appreciated. 

 

Be cool to each other

 

Ryan 

Link to comment
Crawford_T

Hannah checkers are a game changer for sure. It’s all budget dependent really, if cost is no issue then Cal, Alk, Mag, ULR phosphate and even nitrate for ease of use. I use a refractometer for salinity personally but digital would be cool. 
 

Main advantage of the Hannah Checkers is the digital reading as opposed to trying to interpret a color shade. 

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
mcarroll
18 hours ago, Mohawk Mafia said:

Hey All,

 

Recently bought the G2 Max Nano Peninsula AIO and need to get some testers before it arrives. I am thinking The Hanna line because from what I have read they seem to be pretty decent testers. My first thoughts are these, calcium, salinity, Ph. Other ones are phosphate and alkalinity, but not sure how these would enhance my success rate. Any insights are always greatly appreciated. 

 

Be cool to each other

 

Ryan 

Have you used any test kits before?  Also is this your first tank?  Hanna kits are nice, but maybe not the best for everything for every reefer.  Standard drip tests and even dip-stick tests are fine, faster or easier for some things.

 

In general, you only need salinity testing to get started (mixing saltwater; making up for evaporation, etc).  

 

If you plan on making big ammonia spikes while you have livestock in the tank (eg cycling), then pH, ammonia and nitrate test kits can be interesting and helpful.  (pH and temperature along with an ammonia reading can tell you the percentage of ammonia in the tank that would be toxic vs non-toxic.  Better to avoid making ammonia spikes instead though.)

 

Calcium, alkalinity and magnesium (as well as phosphates and nitrates) are interesting once you have corals.

 

Your LFS can probably do some or all of your testing for you too.  You have options!! 🙂 👍

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Mohawk Mafia

Ok so I just got back from the LFS. They didn't have the heater or the Hanna tester I wanted. I hit the link above and bought that instead. (thanks KC2020). Should be here before the tank is 🙂

 

Be Cool to Each Other

 

Ryan

  • Like 2
Link to comment
anizato
On 6/2/2024 at 7:52 AM, Mohawk Mafia said:

Hey All,

 

Recently bought the G2 Max Nano Peninsula AIO and need to get some testers before it arrives. I am thinking The Hanna line because from what I have read they seem to be pretty decent testers. My first thoughts are these, calcium, salinity, Ph. Other ones are phosphate and alkalinity, but not sure how these would enhance my success rate. Any insights are always greatly appreciated. 

 

Be cool to each other

 

Ryan 

I would pass on the Calcium Hanna Checker. get the Salifert instead, everyone uses it, industry standard, the Hanna Calcium requires distilled water, NON RODI, to perform the test successfully.

 

Hanna is good for Phosphorus, dKH, pH

 

I personally use the Hanna dKH for alk and the Hanna Phosphorus ULR for p4 

 

BUT before you get any tests get yourself a digital refactometer from Milwaukee, best device for the hobby. knowing exactly where your salinity is at in less than a second with 3 drops from the tank is the best investment. 

 

Staying on top of ALK & p4 is key, because this is how you can maintain stability. This is how you determine how fast your feeding turns into phosphates & nitrates (use API for no3)

 

Link to comment
Airedale.Reef
23 hours ago, Mohawk Mafia said:

Ok so I just got back from the LFS. They didn't have the heater or the Hanna tester I wanted. I hit the link above and bought that instead. (thanks KC2020). Should be here before the tank is 🙂

 

Be Cool to Each Other

 

Ryan

Glad you purchased the all in one! You would be the first person in my experience to have used this new device from Hanna, and I am really interested in your thoughts. I believe you still have to utilize all of the specific regents, but the testing is done once as opposed to multiple checkers. Should be fantastic! 

 

Sorry your LFS didn't have the heater you wanted. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
mcarroll

Mostly I think it's just space-efficient vs the individual testers, but it does have a few extra features like the bluetooth uplink.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
6 hours ago, mcarroll said:

Mostly I think it's just space-efficient vs the individual testers, but it does have a few extra features like the bluetooth uplink.

Which is good, The individual Hanna checker boxes are big for storage.

  • Agree 1
Link to comment
mcarroll
7 hours ago, Kev1n said:

Which is good, The individual Hanna checker boxes are big for storage.

I keep my test kits (a mix of Hanna and others) in a tackle box currently, and I like it....I tried several other ways to organize my kits before and this is better.  

 

At Hanna, the kit form of their Multitester, at $450 (on hanna's site) works out to about $60/test and comes with a plastic case with a foam insert that perfectly fits all the reagents, associated labware, and the tester.  That's definitely a price break vs buying the kits separately.

 

This seems to be around the same size as my tackle box, maybe a little smaller, and the organization it brings for all the reagents at once is probably really convenient vs dealing with individual boxes for every test that's run.  

 

(FWIW, I don't run every test every time.  Most used is alk and the refractometer.  Occationally those + cal and mag.  I kinda stopped testing nutrients since they're always plenty high these days.)

 

Compared to the Lamotte / API spin-style testers, this Hanna is a lot more work but also a lot more accurate.  Also, the Multitester's price is less (about 1/2 to 1/3 the cost?!) but I'd be curious how that works out in the long run on a per-test basis.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
35 minutes ago, mcarroll said:

I keep my test kits (a mix of Hanna and others) in a tackle box currently, and I like it....I tried several other ways to organize my kits before and this is better.  

I may just follow you with that idea.

  • Like 2
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...