Jump to content

Just got a Nano Cube


nofriendsbz3

Recommended Posts

I just got a Nanocube yesterday and today i got 2 true percula clownfish. (i think thats what they are called) this is my first setup. The guy at the fist store had me bring back the sponge that came with the nanocube and traded me for a cultured one. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions as what to do next like anemonies or what kind of corals would be good.

 

I was also wondering if i should setup a little moonlight type of thing. What are your guys opinions on those.

 

My main question is what should i do next, now that i have the fish what should i get next to help the tank.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated

 

nick

Link to comment
  • Replies 54
  • Created
  • Last Reply

The things you should do next:

 

1. Retreive your dead fish out of the tank. (ammonia suffocation).

 

2. Let your tank cycle.

 

3. Buy a new fish.

Link to comment

yeah?? why fish already??

 

 

please do lots of reading before you start throwing things in the tank. it will only make your experience a better one.

 

what type of lighting is on the setup?

 

what are all your water parameters?

 

what is your testing equipment?

 

what are you going to dose?

 

what are you going to feed the corals?

 

how much live rock do you have?

 

what type of water are you using for topoff?

 

how often are you going to do water changes, and how much at a time?

 

do you have a clean up crew, will you have one?

 

these are some of the very basic questions that you should be thinking about before you start worring about corals

if you rush into this hobby without researching it first, it WILL back fire on you and you will lose lots of time, money, and the lives of the animals.

Link to comment

i put fish in there because the guy at the fish store said that it would be okay because he gave me a pre cultured filter.

 

How do i test the amonia in the water.

 

Im gonna buy a test kit today, do you guys have any recomendations.

 

I have a reef kit that i bought yesterday that comes with the liquids that i put in the water like Iodine, calcium and one other one.

 

Im not trying to rush into this, im taking my time. I was told it was good to have a couple of fish in the tank to help it.

 

What do you guys mean by letting it cycle first before i put fish in it. Thats probably a dumb question to you guys, but im new.

 

Thank you

 

nick

Link to comment
reeferbarra20

well like my post reads , "local Fish stores are Retarded" Dude, never, ever take advice from anyone at a fish store. 1. Because they will tell you anything just to sell you fish. 2. They really are retarded, because this guy at my lfs told me I could get corals , and they would be ok with standard lighting. I knew he was retarded because I had read up on the corals that I wanted to get before i went to them. Do your self a favor and research before you buy, because in the long run it will save you alot of money. And if your so excited and can't wait , the only fish that I reccommend getting for a "cycling tank" are domino damsels and blue damsels.One, because they are very hardy and can withstand new setups, and two , because they are very cheap.

There are many different methods for cycling a tank and this is just one way to do it. Listen to the people on this forum because from what I have seen, they seem to be very experienced. Good luck, Reeferbarra20

Link to comment

thank you for your help. Ive been doing alot of research and there is quite alot to know about this hobby. Im excited to start a long healthy tank.

 

What would be your advice as what to do next.

 

Ive been reading about nitrite and nitrate. Whats the difference and how do i test that.

 

Im gonna by a pH tester today is this a good one http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...4332006061&rd=1

 

what do you recomend for a test kit setup.

 

thank you

 

nick

Link to comment

Hey sorry to hijack the thread, but does anyone know how accurate those pH meters are? If they are good I may pick one up- much easier than testing with the kits all the time and it would be more cost effective too.

 

Good luck with the tank bro.

Link to comment

dont be surprised when your 2 clowns die. a pre-cultured filter is going to do nothing but leak nitrates into your system, which you are going to have alot of soon anyway.

Link to comment

is there any way that i could make sure that my fish dont die. I took a water sample to the fish store and all of my levels checked out perfect. Water temperature is good. What can i do to make sure they dont die??

 

thank you

Link to comment

my fish look like they are doing perfectly fine. Just swimming around and hanging out. How can i tell if they are doing bad.

 

thank you

Link to comment

The term 'cycling' is applied to the process which takes place as a new aquarium 'matures'. This refers to the build up of essential bacteria, which break down wastes. The implications of this are probably the single most important factor in maintaining healthy fish.

 

Fish waste

Uneaten food

Plant matter

wastes AMMONIA

 

Conversion

by bacteria NITRITE

 

Conversion

by bacteria NITRATE

 

Removed (mainly)

by water changes

 

 

In a new aquarium, there are not enough of the bacteria to cope with the waste load and toxic ammonia can rise to dangerous levels. Eventually, the bacteria increase to cope with the ammonia, converting it to another, only slighly less toxic compound - Nitrite. This too will then rise to high levels until a second type of bacteria increases and converts it to the much less toxic Nitrate. This process can take several weeks. In the confines of an aquarium, there is not really a complete 'cycle', and most of the end product, Nitrate, is normally removed by water changes as shown in the diagram above.

 

There are therefore certain things which should be done to minimise any stress or even fatalities during the cycling period:

 

Add only a few hardy fish at first and feed lightly to minimise wastes.

Test water regularly and perform water changes to reduce the levels of ammonia and nitrite if they become dangerously high. The bacteria are attached to surfaces, so removing water should not slow down the maturing process.

If possible, obtain some gravel, tank decor, plants or filter media from a mature tank. This will introduce some of the necessary bacteria and may reduce or even eliminate cycling time.

The aquarium is considered 'mature' when ammonia and nitrite have reduced to zero, and nitrates have begun to rise. At this point it will be necessary to begin a regular program of water changes to keep the level of nitrates low (aim for less than 50 mg/l, less than 25 mg/l is better).

(Note: mg/l = milligrams per litre and is essentially the same as ppm = parts per million, for most purposes).

 

Methods of 'fishless cycling' exist, which avoids exposing fish to the stressful conditions of cycling -

Link to comment

I would agree with reillyse and try to return the fish to the store until you've had more time to absorb what all you need to do here. I did a fishless cycle on my freshwater tank that took 32 days to complete. During that time the ammonia and nitrite levels rose to very toxic levels that probably would have killed most fish if I'd had any in there. It would be like locking you in your house and then slowly releasing a toxic gas into the house. You might be fine for even a few days, but as the gas built up, you'd start feeling worse and worse and probably eventually die. I would prefer to not torture the fish and return them, learn how to get my tank ready for fish, then introduce fish again after your tank has matured enough to handle them. Good luck.

Link to comment

WOW BLACKJACK that was alot of help. I really appreciate it.

 

I got a cultured filter from the fish store where i bought my tank and that is why i got fish.

 

What is a good tester to test NITRITE, NITRATE, AMmONIA, pH and Salinity.

 

Now that i already have the fish when should i do my first water change to get the ammonia levels down.

 

thank you

Link to comment

That cultured filter is NOT going to make everything ok... Just wanted to point this out... plus sponge filters can lead to more problems then they resolve....

 

Originally posted by nofriendsbz3

WOW BLACKJACK that was alot of help. I really appreciate it.  

 

I got a cultured filter from the fish store where i bought my tank and that is why i got fish.

 

What is a good tester to test NITRITE, NITRATE, AMmONIA, pH and Salinity.  

 

Now that i already have the fish when should i do my first water change to get the ammonia levels down.  

 

                              thank you

Link to comment

The fish that you bought (clownfish) are not a good choice to cycle the tank. I would take them back to the store you bought them from and trade them for 1 or 2 domino or blue damsels. The "cultured sponge " will only help with the cycling time and not with the water toxicity. To answer your next question, purchase a saltwater test kit package at your LFS. Get a kit that has Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, and PH. to start. Get a refractometer. And third do a 10-15 % water change each week.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recommended Discussions


×
×
  • Create New...