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Basslets

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Basslets

Grammatidae_-_Gramma_loreto.JPG

Basslets are colorful fish which do well in captivity.  A top is recommended as they can occasionally jump.  Smaller basslets are reef safe (with the exception of small shrimp), while larger basslets can pose a threat to smaller fish, shrimp, and other crustaceans.  Offer plenty of live rock for shelter.  Assessors have an unusual practice of "hanging out" upside down or vertically in: caves, overhangs, and other shaded areas.

 

Feed Basslets a variety of meaty foods: including mysis shrimp, and quality frozen preparations.

 

Deepwater Candy Basslet (Liopropoma carmabi)

Max Size: 2.5"

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Care level: Difficult

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Western Atlantic Ocean

Species Notes: Often collected at more than 80 feet deep, the Deepwater Candy Basslet requires temperatures between 68°F and 74°F (typically requiring a chiller).

 

Swissguard Basslet (Liopropoma rubre)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Caribbean, Tropical Western Atlantic

Liopropoma_rubre_Poey,_1861._Peppermint_bass.jpg

 

Royal Gramma Basslet (Gramma loreto)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Caribbean, Tropical Western Pacific

Species Notes: Can be kept in groups in tanks over 100 gallons, but should be kept singly in nano tanks.

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Macneill's Assessor Basslet (Assessor macneilli) a.k.a. Blue Assessor

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Moderate

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Australia, Coral Sea

Species Notes: Feed at least twice a day.

AssessMacneilRStuartSmith.jpg

 

Randall’s Assessor Basslet (Assessor randalli)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Moderate

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Philippines

Species Notes: Feed at least twice a day.

 

Chalk Bass (Serranus tortugarum)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Caribbean, Tropical Western Atlantic

Hal_-_Serranus_tortugarum_-_2.jpg


Lantern Bass (Serranus baldwini)

Max Size: 4.5"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: With Caution
Origin: Caribbean, Tropical Western Atlantic

Species Notes: Should not be kept with small fish or shrimp.

Serranidae_-_Serranus_baldwini.JPG

 

Black Cap Basslet (Gramma melacara)

Max Size: 4"

Minimum Tank Size: 40 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: Yes
Origin: Caribbean

Species Notes: Does best with lots of rockscape, as it may compete for territory with other rock dwelling species (like certain blennies and gobies).

Black_Cap_Basslet.jpg

 

Tobacco Basslet (Serranus tabacarius)

Max Size: 7"

Minimum Tank Size: 70 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: With Caution
Origin: Caribbean, Tropical Western Atlantic

Species Notes: Can pose a threat to smaller fishes (like small damsels, gobies, and blennies) as well as to small crustaceans.  Multiples can be kept in tanks greater than 120 gallons.

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Harlequin Bass (Serranus tigrinus)

Max Size: 11.5"

Minimum Tank Size: 75 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive

Reef Compatible: With Caution
Origin: Caribbean, Tropical Western Atlantic

Species Notes: May be aggressive to smaller tank mates, smaller sea basses, or bottom dwelling fish which occupy the same territory.

Harlequin_Bass_(Serranus_tigrinus).jpg

 

Photos by image.png.764b7df6a2818ad7ca0b4ddd2d888742.png

 

Saltwater Fish Index

 

Edited by seabass
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growsomething

Would love to fill my 200g with a bunch of these smaller ones if I ever set it up and do a FL biotope someday.

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seabass
5 minutes ago, growsomething said:

Would love to fill my 200g with a bunch of these smaller ones if I ever set it up and do a FL biotope someday.

I totally agree.  Watching multiple Royal Grammas would make for a beautiful display.

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Tritone

Yoo hoo, my favourites!
Thanks for the chapter. Are we still going to have a pinned Index on top of main page?

 

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seabass

Maybe when it's done.

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Micro-Reefs Aquariums

I have the Swiss Guard Basslet in my 30 gallon reef system.  He is very beautiful but elusive and shy, he has the whole tank to himself as it is a new system.  He loves the 30 lbs of live rock I have in the tank and he patrols all around in the shadows.  He is very intelligent and when I feed he goes around the shadows of the tank to eat the frozen brine I feed.

 

You listed the candy basslet which comes from deep water, can you make sure you let others know that you cannot keep that deep water species at 78F degrees for the fish to thrive. 

 

Many don't know that at depth, you are talking about much different oxygen needs from the cooler waters, please add the depth at which the candy is collected and how it should be supported in such a system that can bring down the temp to the requirement

 

Thanks for sharing all this information on basslets. .  

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A.m.P

This'll be a weird recommendation, but after collecting the experience of a handful of distributors and other hobbyist; it may make sense to classify the Black Cap as 30-40 gallons for "sole specimen" (Maybe with one or two open water fish who won't go near the rocks) and cautious with CuC.
55+ for keeping them with a community (or an immense amount of rockwork).
FWIW it seems they can have more of a tobbacco/lantern basslet disposition, as opposed to fairly-peaceful chalk bass.

Side note, it may work to also keep them with minimal rockscape because that would let you "set" their territory, but that may lead to stress and reclusiveness.

When they mature they are quite large and will basically claim most of the open rockwork in the tank as their territory and flit between it throughout the day.
Their aggression is usually harmless posturing but can include chasing and pinning fish to corners (and keeping them there).
They can and will kill small snails (or snails too close to their territory), they can eat baby snails or shrimp.
 
I wouldn't advise keeping them with anything else that lives on the rock and I wouldn't advise keeping them with anything that isn't resilient to being bullied, which isn't willing to move when approached, and isn't rather durable.
Caution with Blennies -gudgeons are probably a no-go- and caution with peaceful, non-open water fish (Firefish and such should be okay), but may get along with damselfish if they can hold their own or run away. They're also pretty feisty with new tankmates so I would always "Add Last".

My .02.

 

Edit, now with pictures.

 

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