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Wrasses

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Tamberav

Wrasses

wrasse7.JPG.2e0d7d6f9f17438e342c4f09875969e6.JPG

 

The wrasse is a large and diverse group containing over 60 genera and 500 species. Wrasses are a very active fish and generally do best on several feedings a day of a variety of meaty foods. Their family name Labridae is from the Greek word labros, which means "greedy" because they love to eat! A system with ample live rock or a refugium can provide good natural food opportunities for them to hunt between feedings. They are also jumpers so a covered tank is a must.

 

Wrasses are hermaphrodites and start out as female and can transition into male. Some wrasses have different sex/color changes among the juvenile, female, sub-male and super males. Most wrasses live in harems in the wild and do not form pairs (like clownfish) in captivity. Most females transition to male regardless of the presence of another male. Wrasses that sleep in the rocks form a mucus cocoon while others sleep in the sand bed. 

 

Sand sleeping wrasses include the Anampses, Halichoeres, Macropharyngodon, and Pseudojuloides. They require a sand bed of 1-2 inches (minimum) from sugar sand to 4mm in size. These wrasses may disturb low lying corals by throwing sand and may hide for an extended period when first added. Do not go digging through the sand or rock looking for them as this will cause more stress and these fish can take some time to adjust. 

 

Selection: Many wrasses are poor shippers, are easily stressed, and may refuse to eat when they first arrive. Foods such as live worms or enriched live brine shrimp may be required in the beginning. Generally over time wrasses will except a wide variety of meaty food eagerly. Some wrasses are only zooplankton feeders and will eat out of the water column only while others will feed out of the water and off surfaces. Look for a fish that is swimming normally, eating, and isn't emaciated. Avoid skinny fish that have a pinched head. Watch for signs of scratching or twitching as this is often a sign of parasites. Ask the store to feed the fish in front of you. Newly arrived fish may not eat but finding one that does puts you ahead of the game. Research the particular wrasse you plan to add. Some are small at only a few inches to several feet while others may flip rocks or eat most all invertebrates including your clean up crew. While many wrasses are on the more peaceful side, there are several that can be aggressive bullies. Furthermore, if you have a larger tank and plan on mixing wrasses, choose carefully and put the more timid ones in first. Wrasses are often harem forming, so avoid multiple males of the same kind (this will often end in disaster) but those within the same genes can still generally be mixed as long as the tank is large enough to meet their needs. Females will generally mix more peacefully than males. Flashing and mild chasing are normal. 

 

For those with larger tanks who plan on adding multiple wrasse, an acclimation box can increase success and cut down on aggression from established wrasses. Plan on 2-3 days or longer if aggression is being shown. This gives the wrasses a chance to interact and get used to each other without being able to bully and intimidate the new-comer. Be sure to add sand to the bottom of the box for sand sleepers and a hiding spot such as a PVC pipe. 

 

McCosker's, Carpenter's, and Yellowfin Flasher Wrasse (Paracheilinus sp.)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Six Line Wrasse (Pseudocheilinus hexataenia)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive (do not keep with other wrasses)

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Yellow Banded, White Banded, and Tanaka's Possum Wrasse (Wetmorla sp.)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Pink-Streaked Wrasse (Pseudocheilinops ataenia)

Max Size: 2.5"

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Yellow Fin Fairy and Lubbock's Fairy Wrasse (Cirrhilabrus sp.)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Yellow "Coris" and Melanurus Wrasse (Halichoeres sp.)

Max Size: 5-6”

Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Leopard, Black, Ornate, and Blue Star Leopard Wrasse (Macropharyngodon sp.)

Max Size: 5-6"

Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons

Care level: Expert Only

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

 

More information can be found here by Hunter Hammond aka "evolved" - https://www.thewrasseguy.com/

 

 

 

 

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Tritone

Excellent.

Clownfish page has been changed too.

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seabass

Thanks for the great (and extensive) write-up.

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Snow_Phoenix
On 7/12/2021 at 3:54 AM, Tamberav said:

Wrasses

wrasse7.JPG.2e0d7d6f9f17438e342c4f09875969e6.JPG

 

The wrasse is a large and diverse group containing over 60 genera and 500 species. Wrasses are a very active fish and generally do best on several feedings a day of a variety of meaty foods. Their family name Labridae is from the Greek word labros, which means "greedy" because they love to eat! A system with ample live rock or a refugium can provide good natural food opportunities for them to hunt between feedings. They are also jumpers so a covered tank is a must.

 

Wrasses are hermaphrodites and start out as female and can transition into male. Some wrasses have different sex/color changes among the juvenile, female, sub-male and super males. Most wrasses live in harems in the wild and do not form pairs (like clownfish) in captivity. Most females transition to male regardless of the presence of another male. Wrasses that sleep in the rocks form a mucus cocoon while others sleep in the sand bed. 

 

Sand sleeping wrasses include the Anampses, Halichoeres, Macropharyngodon, and Pseudojuloides. They require a sand bed of 1-2 inches (minimum) from sugar sand to 4mm in size. These wrasses may disturb low lying corals by throwing sand and may hide for an extended period when first added. Do not go digging through the sand or rock looking for them as this will cause more stress and these fish can take some time to adjust. 

 

Selection: Many wrasses are poor shippers, are easily stressed, and may refuse to eat when they first arrive. Foods such as live worms or enriched live brine shrimp may be required in the beginning. Generally over time wrasses will except a wide variety of meaty food eagerly. Some wrasses are only zooplankton feeders and will eat out of the water column only while others will feed out of the water and off surfaces. Look for a fish that is swimming normally, eating, and isn't emaciated. Avoid skinny fish that have a pinched head. Watch for signs of scratching or twitching as this is often a sign of parasites. Ask the store to feed the fish in front of you. Newly arrived fish may not eat but finding one that does puts you ahead of the game. Research the particular wrasse you plan to add. Some are small at only a few inches to several feet while others may flip rocks or eat most all invertebrates including your clean up crew. While many wrasses are on the more peaceful side, there are several that can be aggressive bullies. Furthermore, if you have a larger tank and plan on mixing wrasses, choose carefully and put the more timid ones in first. Wrasses are often harem forming, so avoid multiple males of the same kind (this will often end in disaster) but those within the same genes can still generally be mixed as long as the tank is large enough to meet their needs. Females will generally mix more peacefully than males. Flashing and mild chasing are normal. 

 

For those with larger tanks who plan on adding multiple wrasse, an acclimation box can increase success and cut down on aggression from established wrasses. Plan on 2-3 days or longer if aggression is being shown. This gives the wrasses a chance to interact and get used to each other without being able to bully and intimidate the new-comer. Be sure to add sand to the bottom of the box for sand sleepers and a hiding spot such as a PVC pipe. 

 

McCosker's, Carpenter's, and Yellowfin Flasher Wrasse (Paracheilinus sp.)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Six Line Wrasse (Pseudocheilinus hexataenia)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 20 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Semi-aggressive (do not keep with other wrasses)

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Yellow Banded, White Banded, and Tanaka's Possum Wrasse (Wetmorla sp.)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Pink-Streaked Wrasse (Pseudocheilinops ataenia)

Max Size: 2.5"

Minimum Tank Size: 15 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Yellow Fin Fairy and Lubbock's Fairy Wrasse (Cirrhilabrus sp.)

Max Size: 3"

Minimum Tank Size: 30 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Yellow "Coris" and Melanurus Wrasse (Halichoeres sp.)

Max Size: 5"

Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons

Care level: Easy

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

Leopard, Black, Ornate, and Blue Star Leopard Wrasse (Macropharyngodon sp.)

Max Size: 5-6"

Minimum Tank Size: 50 gallons

Care level: Expert Only

Temperament: Peaceful

Reef Compatible: Yes

 

 

More information can be found here by Hunter Hammond aka "evolved" - https://www.thewrasseguy.com/

 

 

Tam, yellow coris can hit 6" in captivity. The one my LFS had in their DT for 3 years was slightly over 6" and very, very thick/broad. 🙂 

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