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Broseff

It's me again, in a what some would say appalling situation. I had to break down my tank, but wanted to salvage what I could to potentially rebuild. I'm kinda hoping some of this could work long term. 

 

Anyways, I ended up with 4 containers that I've had up for 1-2 weeks. 

 

Container #1 

  • 1/2 gallon - Tall & Narrow
  • Emerald Crab
  • Zoa
  • Xmass Tree Macro
  • Nerite Snails (2)
  • Cerith snail

 

The cerith died, it fell from the top and was on it's back for a while without moving. The zoa was pretty unhappy, the emerald was sitting on it (I removed it, before it notably died). The emerald just stopped moving one day (it was pregnant too, if that means anything) and is confirmed dead. The nerites are fine, same with macros. Just saw some kind of worm that's chillin. Did a massive water change, gonna keep a close eye on it to make sure the nerites and macros make it. 

 

Container #2

  • 1/4 gallon - Wide & Short
  • Pompom Crab
  • Small Feather Duster
  • Nerite Snail

 

Everything is alive and well, no issues. I have no idea how it's doing so well. 

 

Container #3

  • Old Gelato Cup 
  • Hairy Mushroom Coral
  • Brittle Starfish 
  • Asterina Starfish
  • Cerith Snail

 

The mushroom seems a little unhappy (it's shrinking up), but also looks like it's trying to split. Everything else is fine. 

 

Container #4 - Not pictured

  • Old Gelato Cup
  • Halimeda
  • Brittle Starfish
  • Spaghetti Worm

 

The Spaghetti worm passed away, couldn't find the starfish (it's probably in the Halimeda?). The whole thing smells rancid. I did a massive water change and have my eye out for the starfish. 

 

I've been dosing Bacteria into all the containers (in very small amounts) and have done partial water changes. Any ideas why some of containers are doing so well? and why some are doing awful?

I really thought containers #2 & #3 were going to be problamatic, very surprised by how poorly containers #1 & #4 did.

 

 

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Clown79

Is there any water movement in these containers? 

 

Oxygen is required to keep it all alive.

 

Why not just put it all in 1 bucket with water movement and heater?

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Tired

Yeah, you should really put everything in a 5gal bucket with some sort of water movement, and with a proper heater. I'd guess that general lack of stability, and possibly lack of oxygen, is killing things. 

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M. Tournesol

Look for jar reef tanks.

They use Air pump for water mouvement and have cover as evaporation is a big problem with such small volume of water.

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Broseff

Update: 

 

Container #2 is going STRONG. All inhabitants still alive and active. Not sure how they're surviving still.

 

Container #1 is doing better. Nerites are eating the hair algae that was on the macros. Hopefully the macros keep growing. 

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Broseff

Update:

 

Container #2 is doing GREAT. All inhabitants are all alive and healthy. 

 

Pom Pom Crab wanders about and is eating pellets. 

 

Found a 2nd smaller feather duster attached to the first. I've been feeding it some algae/phytoplankton.

 

Both asterina and micro bittle starfish have been out and about. 

 

All snails have been making their way around the tank.

 

No water changes so far.

 

I don't have a light on it, so no algae growth as far as I can see. 

 

I'm assuming that bacteria is providing the necessary oxygen for everything to live. 

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Tired

I'm reasonably sure the only common reef tank bacteria that produces oxygen is cyanobacteria, and you'd need a lot of that to get anywhere. 

 

Why is everything still in tiny containers? Why risk the health of the critters? Just plonk it all in a bucket.

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Broseff

 

21 hours ago, Tired said:

I'm reasonably sure the only common reef tank bacteria that produces oxygen is cyanobacteria, and you'd need a lot of that to get anywhere. 

 

Why is everything still in tiny containers? Why risk the health of the critters? Just plonk it all in a bucket.

Then I have no idea, how everything is getting enough oxygen. 

 

Everything was in there originally cause I broke down a tank and I left everything in the small container cause it lived. I wanted to see if no filter, no flow, was doable. 

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M. Tournesol

How long will you take your little experiment? Until every thing die? 1 month is long enough. 

7 hours ago, Broseff said:

Then I have no idea, how everything is getting enough oxygen. 

 after 1 month do you have an idea? will 2 months give you more information?

 

Crabs are solide animals (one did come with my live rock that was transported without water), corals less.

If you value your critters, you should stop. If not, stop posting it on the forum. It's not a good idea to give precedent that no flow is ok. What would append if a newbie wanted to do the same thing?

 

If you want a kick answer to your Question: water equilibrate its oxygen/co2 level with the atmosphere level. Flow help the process to happen quicker. If you had a fish in your "tupperware", the speed of consumption of oxygen will be mush hight than the speed of oxygen coming from the atmosphere. This will result with your fish dying. If your live stock is still alive, it means that it oxygen consumption is low enough. With an air pump, it's not the bubble that put oxygen in the water but the surface agitation that accelerate this equilibrium process.

 

Look at the PH of your 3 "tupperwares", as a higher CO2 level is qual to a more acidic water, you should sees a difference in ph between your containers if their CO2 level (and thus oxygen) is different. 

 

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Tired

Crustaceans can feel pain, so they're really not good to experiment with. At the very least, you should put your crabs in a bucket with some good live rock. Experimenting with corals and seaweed is fine, but not with things that can feel pain. 

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Clown79
2 minutes ago, Tired said:

Crustaceans can feel pain, so they're really not good to experiment with. At the very least, you should put your crabs in a bucket with some good live rock. Experimenting with corals and seaweed is fine, but not with things that can feel pain. 

Even during 3 hr tank transfers, everything had water movement because oxygen = life. 

 

 

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Tired

Agreed, but I think you've quoted the wrong message. 

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