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kevnick80

Coral doesn’t seem to open

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kevnick80

Hi guys

 

Have this zoa and for some reason, it doesn’t seem to open up. 
 

Checked all my parameters- temp is 26.5, salinity is 1.025, no ammonia, nitrite or nitrate or phosphate. Calcium is 420. Good flow in the tank. 
 

Any ideas how to make it happier?

 

 

9F53DFF6-9071-48A0-9818-1ED67F1C6AA7.jpeg

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Clown79

0 nitrate and 0 phosphate isn't good. 

 

Corals need both 

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kevnick80
8 hours ago, Clown79 said:

0 nitrate and 0 phosphate isn't good. 

 

Corals need both 

I did think that, nitrates especially. 
 

ive got all the salifert test kits, but don’t seem to get anything other that a zero reading on them all. And I’ve been testing daily or every second day since putting in the fish. They are all in date too. 
 

How can I introduce nitrates? Feed more?

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mcarroll
48 minutes ago, kevnick80 said:

How can I introduce nitrates? Feed more?

Yes, maybe.

 

How old is this tank?  How is it set up?  What else is living in it so far?

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kevnick80
4 minutes ago, mcarroll said:

Yes, maybe.

 

How old is this tank?  How is it set up?  What else is living in it so far?

It’s about a month old. Cycled with ATM Colony. I’ve two clowns and an emerald and Pom Pom crab. 
 

I’ve only got filter floss for filtration, a wavemaker and TMC Eco Reef rock. 

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mcarroll

A tank that young will definitely need to be fed.  

 

Try to stay efficient with your feedings though....feed more frequently vs just more quantity so that a high percentage is eaten vs wasted.

 

If corals are having issues, sometimes it's helpful to dose liquid nutrients for N and P until the tank matures.  (A healthy, mature reef will recycle WAY MORE nutrients than a new one.  Dissolved nutrients should become somewhat less important over time.)

 

Another thing to consider is that zoanthids are the moodiest coral on the planet.  Fix things that are wrong (ie nutrient levels) but don't expect them to say thank you right away...it may not even be what's p*ssing them off.  (They may not even be p*ssed....just MOODY.)

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kevnick80
29 minutes ago, mcarroll said:

A tank that young will definitely need to be fed.  

 

Try to stay efficient with your feedings though....feed more frequently vs just more quantity so that a high percentage is eaten vs wasted.

 

If corals are having issues, sometimes it's helpful to dose liquid nutrients for N and P until the tank matures.  (A healthy, mature reef will recycle WAY MORE nutrients than a new one.  Dissolved nutrients should become somewhat less important over time.)

 

Another thing to consider is that zoanthids are the moodiest coral on the planet.  Fix things that are wrong (ie nutrient levels) but don't expect them to say thank you right away...it may not even be what's p*ssing them off.  (They may not even be p*ssed....just MOODY.)

Okay cool. Thanks for the explanation. 
 

I’m in the UK. Any ideas for brands of those nutrients to add?

 

 

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mcarroll

Seachem and Brightwell seem common here...maybe there as well?   If you have a plant shop, they might have the same thing targeted for plants....you want (e.g.) potassium nitrate and potassium phosphate, or similar.

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kevnick80

I’ve bought potassium nitrate online. Any idea how to dose? I’ve a 55L tank. 
 

what kind of nitrate levels am I aiming for?

 

Thanks. 

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Tired

5-10 nitrate and above 0.03 phosphate, as a start. Some tanks do better with more. Phosphates need to be above that mark for photosynthesis, they're particularly important. People generally keep reef tanks under about 20 nitrate, but there are successful tanks running above it, and zoas in particular like nutrients. Phosphates don't really have a (reasonable) number at which they're harmful, the stuff just encourages algae a bit at high levels. There are a couple reefs on here with 1ppm phosphate or more, IIRC, that are doing just fine. 

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kevnick80
3 hours ago, Tired said:

5-10 nitrate and above 0.03 phosphate, as a start. Some tanks do better with more. Phosphates need to be above that mark for photosynthesis, they're particularly important. People generally keep reef tanks under about 20 nitrate, but there are successful tanks running above it, and zoas in particular like nutrients. Phosphates don't really have a (reasonable) number at which they're harmful, the stuff just encourages algae a bit at high levels. There are a couple reefs on here with 1ppm phosphate or more, IIRC, that are doing just fine. 

Cool. 
 

I will try and increase these parameters then. 
 

Thanks!!

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CmtCousteau

Hi,

 

I will follow your topic, since it appear that i have the same problem as you. I'm trying to rise the nitrate by feeding the tank,

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