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BBBunn

How far along is the cycle?

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BBBunn

This was the test from today 🙂 thank you so much I know this is probably a basic question to ask

119885348_367409481066187_4039907004836915087_n.jpg

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tankfullofderps

Hi @BBBunn,

 

Color of test tube on left, is that your Nitrite? Ammonia? Color seems off... Nitrite & Nitrate are spiking (if the tubes are to the left of the test guide), which means you are cycling (bacteria is converting ammonia) - but you want your Nitirtes & Ammonia to return to zero.  

 

  • Are you dosing ammonia?
  • Did you add any live bacteria?
  • Live or dry rock?
  • How long have you been cycling? 

Article on what tank cycling is: Link

 

Here is a good chart that I often refer to. I found in another post, but I can't remember where. By "adding more", they are referring to dosing ammonia (NH3) to 2 ppm.

        image.png.ff82dc0e0721f2b6f258f7c0cbc4999e.png

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seabass

Yeah, we need clarification about your test kits, as well as what and how much are you dosing.  That light blue result isn't normal for any of those kits.

 

3 minutes ago, tankfullofderps said:

Are you dosing ammonia?

I assume that's the only way that nitrite result is possible.

 

Based on the results, I'd change out all the water and retest.  Wait at least 24 hours, then retest again.  Let us know more about the rock and your cycling process so far.

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BBBunn
2 hours ago, tankfullofderps said:

Hi @BBBunn,

 

Color of test tube on left, is that your Nitrite? Ammonia? Color seems off... Nitrite & Nitrate are spiking (if the tubes are to the left of the test guide), which means you are cycling (bacteria is converting ammonia) - but you want your Nitirtes & Ammonia to return to zero.  

 

  • Are you dosing ammonia?
  • Did you add any live bacteria?
  • Live or dry rock?
  • How long have you been cycling? 

Article on what tank cycling is: Link

 

Here is a good chart that I often refer to. I found in another post, but I can't remember where. By "adding more", they are referring to dosing ammonia (NH3) to 2 ppm.

        image.png.ff82dc0e0721f2b6f258f7c0cbc4999e.png

I am dosing ammonia. I did add live sand/dr tims bacteria. its dry rock. its been cycling about 2 weeks

And yeah its ammonia. i though it was strange too.

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BBBunn

retested ammonia and dosed, its about 5-8 ppm should i still do the water change?

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seabass

Since this is dry rock that we are talking about (as we don't dose ammonia when using live rock), your target ammonia level, when dosing, should be no more than 2 ppm.

 

Here's a guide to building a biofilter on dry rock:

  • After dosing ammonia (or ammonium chloride) to 2 ppm, wait until BOTH ammonia and nitrite reach 0.25 ppm (or less).
  • If it took more than 24 hours for ammonia AND nitrite to fall to 0.25 ppm, then repeat the above step.  Keep repeating until your rock can process 2 ppm of ammonia down to 0.25 ppm in 24 hours.
  • Now your rock has a working biofilter.
  • Next test your nitrate level.  For your future livestock, you'll need to lower the level of nitrate down to between 5 and 10 ppm (by performing water changes).
  • After nitrate is between 5 and 10 ppm, you are done.  Wait a few days for any remaining ammonia to be processed, and for your tank (and bacteria) to stabilize after your water changes.  Then you can slowly start to add livestock.

NOTE: When dosing ammonia, at no time should either nitrite OR ammonia hit or exceed 5 ppm.  If by some chance it does, you'll need to perform water changes to reduce BOTH of them to below 5 ppm.  Then wait for them BOTH to drop to 0.25 ppm (or less) before proceeding any further.

 

4 hours ago, BBBunn said:

retested ammonia and dosed, its about 5-8 ppm should i still do the water change?

DEFINITELY!

 

Make sure you follow the guide that I outlined above.  Also, I've never seen a result like that from an API ammonia test kit.  Make sure that you shake the reagent well and use a clean test tube.  I'm not sure how you know that you've dosed to between 5 and 8 ppm when you get a light blue result. :unsure:

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BBBunn
1 hour ago, seabass said:

Since this is dry rock that we are talking about (as we don't dose ammonia when using live rock), your target ammonia level, when dosing, should be no more than 2 ppm.

 

Here's a guide to building a biofilter on dry rock:

  • After dosing ammonia (or ammonium chloride) to 2 ppm, wait until BOTH ammonia and nitrite reach 0.25 ppm (or less).
  • If it took more than 24 hours for ammonia AND nitrite to fall to 0.25 ppm, then repeat the above step.  Keep repeating until your rock can process 2 ppm of ammonia down to 0.25 ppm in 24 hours.
  • Now your rock has a working biofilter.
  • Next test your nitrate level.  For your future livestock, you'll need to lower the level of nitrate down to between 5 and 10 ppm (by performing water changes).
  • After nitrate is between 5 and 10 ppm, you are done.  Wait a few days for any remaining ammonia to be processed, and for your tank (and bacteria) to stabilize after your water changes.  Then you can slowly start to add livestock.

NOTE: When dosing ammonia, at no time should either nitrite OR ammonia hit or exceed 5 ppm.  If by some chance it does, you'll need to perform water changes to reduce BOTH of them to below 5 ppm.  Then wait for them BOTH to drop to 0.25 ppm (or less) before proceeding any further.

 

DEFINITELY!

 

Make sure you follow the guide that I outlined above.  Also, I've never seen a result like that from an API ammonia test kit.  Make sure that you shake the reagent well and use a clean test tube.  I'm not sure how you know that you've dosed to between 5 and 8 ppm when you get a light blue result. :unsure:

i retested!! thank you tho

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tankfullofderps

100% agree with @seabass, you need to do at least 50%-100% water change. Your ammonia is at lethal levels for your bacteria. I had a similar issue when I first started mine. I did a 50% water change and retested ammonia at 2 ppm. The tank cycled it within 48 hours and was back on track. 

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Clown79
10 hours ago, seabass said:

Since this is dry rock that we are talking about (as we don't dose ammonia when using live rock), your target ammonia level, when dosing, should be no more than 2 ppm.

 

Here's a guide to building a biofilter on dry rock:

  • After dosing ammonia (or ammonium chloride) to 2 ppm, wait until BOTH ammonia and nitrite reach 0.25 ppm (or less).
  • If it took more than 24 hours for ammonia AND nitrite to fall to 0.25 ppm, then repeat the above step.  Keep repeating until your rock can process 2 ppm of ammonia down to 0.25 ppm in 24 hours.
  • Now your rock has a working biofilter.
  • Next test your nitrate level.  For your future livestock, you'll need to lower the level of nitrate down to between 5 and 10 ppm (by performing water changes).
  • After nitrate is between 5 and 10 ppm, you are done.  Wait a few days for any remaining ammonia to be processed, and for your tank (and bacteria) to stabilize after your water changes.  Then you can slowly start to add livestock.

NOTE: When dosing ammonia, at no time should either nitrite OR ammonia hit or exceed 5 ppm.  If by some chance it does, you'll need to perform water changes to reduce BOTH of them to below 5 ppm.  Then wait for them BOTH to drop to 0.25 ppm (or less) before proceeding any further.

 

DEFINITELY!

 

Make sure you follow the guide that I outlined above.  Also, I've never seen a result like that from an API ammonia test kit.  Make sure that you shake the reagent well and use a clean test tube.  I'm not sure how you know that you've dosed to between 5 and 8 ppm when you get a light blue result. :unsure:

I've never seen a blue result for ammonia.

 

 

 

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BBBunn
17 hours ago, tankfullofderps said:

100% agree with @seabass, you need to do at least 50%-100% water change. Your ammonia is at lethal levels for your bacteria. I had a similar issue when I first started mine. I did a 50% water change and retested ammonia at 2 ppm. The tank cycled it within 48 hours and was back on track. 

this is after a 90% water change?

119577252_428200788143140_5099549482599380033_n.jpg

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seabass
39 minutes ago, BBBunn said:

this is after a 90% water change

Now you're back in business.  Good job.

 

Watch for ammonia to hit 0.25ppm, then dose back to 2ppm (as per the guideline I posted above).  When your rock can process 2ppm down to 0.25 in a day, then you're done.

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BBBunn
1 hour ago, seabass said:

Now you're back in business.  Good job.

 

Watch for ammonia to hit 0.25ppm, then dose back to 2ppm (as per the guideline I posted above).  When your rock can process 2ppm down to 0.25 in a day, then you're done.

thank you so much ❤️

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