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Chris27

How much ammonia does a clownfish produce?

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Chris27

Hi everyone, i'm new to this forum so I don't so I don't know if i'm posting this in the right place. But I was curious how much ammonia a juvenile clownfish is capable of producing. specifically in a 28 gallon tank.

Its been cycling for 25 days and went 2 ppm of ammonia twice + whatever small amount of ammonia the shrimp produced while it was in their. I've had a light diatom bloom but left the lights off since.

 

The plan this weekend to get 2 hermit crabs or 2 trochus snails along with a bottle of bacteria to ensure they live. And add a clown if all goes well. My tank is only going through about 0.25 ppm daily. Is that enough for a clownfish?

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Tired

No. Your tank shouldn't be considered cycled until it can process 2ppm of ammonia down to 0 in 24 hours or less. Snails might be okay with the bottled bacteria, but it would be better to just get the bacteria.

 

There's no way to know exactly how much ammonia the clownfish will produce, as it depends on fish size and what it's being fed. You want the tank to be properly cycled, anyway, not just barely cycled enough. No sense putting a fish at risk when the tank probably just needs more time. 

 

Do you see nitrates regularly? If you add ammonia and see nitrates shortly thereafter, your tank is nearly cycled, and just needs more time for the bacteria to multiply.

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Chris27
2 minutes ago, Tired said:

No. Your tank shouldn't be considered cycled until it can process 2ppm of ammonia down to 0 in 24 hours or less. Snails might be okay with the bottled bacteria, but it would be better to just get the bacteria.

 

There's no way to know exactly how much ammonia the clownfish will produce, as it depends on fish size and what it's being fed. You want the tank to be properly cycled, anyway, not just barely cycled enough. No sense putting a fish at risk when the tank probably just needs more time. 

 

Do you see nitrates regularly? If you add ammonia and see nitrates shortly thereafter, your tank is nearly cycled, and just needs more time for the bacteria to multiply.

I know for a fact the ammonia is being fully processed into nitrates. Nitrites are consistently at 0. My tank managed to process 2 ppm in 2 3 days but something happened and most of the bacteria died off. the second 2 ppm took 8 days and I don't know why. I'm using powdered ammonia and just eyeballing it until I see the required amount on my test

 

Current parameters

Ammonia 0.25 (down from 0.5 yesterday)

Nitrite 0

Salinity 1.022

Temp 76

Ph 8.0

 

Tank specs

15 lbs fiji pink live sand

15 lbs marco dry rock

Added multiple sponges in the back chamber for additional surface area

dosed 10 ml aquarforest bacteria bottle 

Using salifert test kits for nitrite and ammonia

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Tired

Cool, you're on your way. But you should wait until the tank is fully cycled. It might not badly harm a clownfish to be put in that tank now, but there's no need to take the risk. Give it a week or so.

 

The sponges in the back chamber are probably not needed, and could potentially become nitrate factories if enough stuff gets in 'em. 

 

You should get nitrate and phosphate test kits. They're important numbers to know if you want corals. Mostly to make sure neither of them is zero- low or zero of those will seriously harm and eventually kill your corals. Not urgent, I suppose, but do get them before you get corals. And remember to do a big water change (80% or so is good) before adding any livestock, after the tank is cycled. 

 

One important note: do not add livestock if you're dosing ammonia. Ammonia levels will hurt them. 

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Chris27
14 minutes ago, Tired said:

Cool, you're on your way. But you should wait until the tank is fully cycled. It might not badly harm a clownfish to be put in that tank now, but there's no need to take the risk. Give it a week or so.

 

The sponges in the back chamber are probably not needed, and could potentially become nitrate factories if enough stuff gets in 'em. 

 

You should get nitrate and phosphate test kits. They're important numbers to know if you want corals. Mostly to make sure neither of them is zero- low or zero of those will seriously harm and eventually kill your corals. Not urgent, I suppose, but do get them before you get corals. And remember to do a big water change (80% or so is good) before adding any livestock, after the tank is cycled. 

 

One important note: do not add livestock if you're dosing ammonia. Ammonia levels will hurt them. 

The plan was to wait until the weekend, 5 or 6 days and see how much ammonia it can handle. If the numbers are bad ill  wait an extra week for some clean up crew and see how that goes.

The sponges are not for physical filtration, but for extra surface area for the bacteria. It will definitely be under a layer of filter floss and hopefully avoid contact with any detritus or food that might break down.

I have a nitrate kit but im not gonna bother with testing it when there is nitrite presence in the water, which can make the test innacurate

I know ammonia is harmful in saltwater as low as 0.1 ppm, so i'm definitely not gonna be dosing any ammonium after I have livestock

 

How fast does bacteria multiply? So far I have had no success with having it multiply in my tank. I just dosed the final drops of bottled bacteria today so I guess ill see.

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Tired

Depends on the conditions, but it should absolutely be multiplying. Assuming the temperature, salinity, and so on are in line, you should have it spread pretty fast. Your salinity is a tiny bit low, you might want to bring that up, but it shouldn't have hurt anything. 

 

How sure are you that your ammonia test is accurate? Way too much ammonia can stall your cycle pretty badly. 

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Chris27

I used the salifert test and followed the intructions to a t. some of the stalling could be a result of the fluctuating temperature in the first few weeks, the heater I was using was innacurate.

 

I keep the tank at a low salinity because it keeps a little bit of room for error, ammonia is slightly less toxic at lower salinities, and it saves a few bucks by making the bucket last another couple of weeks. I have no ato, I just stuck a few lines of tape in the back chamber and im topping off daily

 

The only bottled bacteria available at my "lfs" is aquavitro  seed bacteria. which ive flankly never heard of. 

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j.falk

I wouldn't keep the salinity that low.  Especially if you plan on adding livestock soon.  You're only making things harder on yourself.

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Tired

Corals aren't going to be a huge fan of low salinity. This is not the place to save a few bucks. And you shouldn't be thinking about ammonia being less toxic, you should be thinking about having no ammonia, period. 

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Chris27

Like I said, the main reason im keeping salinity low is room for error. If I forget to top off for a few days at 1.026, everything in my tank is dead. 

(FYI I retested and the actual number is 1.024, I have no clue how the salinity just went up)

 

Small ammonia spikes are inevitable when adding new livestock or something dies. Like I said, the plan is to be patient and wait until my biofilter can handle more ammonia

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