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Amphrites

Keeping a DT cycled during 6 week QT

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Amphrites

Can't seem to find too many guides out there for keeping the display tank chugging-along full-speed while fish are in hospital tanks.
I doubt ghost feeding would be sufficient in larger volumes and the only residents are a few hermits and a cleaner who I'll primarily be spot-feeding.
Should I consider dosing ammonia to keep the bacteria colonies at full population size? If so about how much would be appropriate for a 35 gallon system with three or four juvenile fish?

Odd questions I know, but I can't seem to track down much quality information.

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Clown79

The bacteria won't die, it takes drying out rock, chemicals, a screw up to kill it.

 

There are lots of fishless tanks out there.

 

Adding ammonia to a cycled tank will kill it.

 

Are there any corals or cuc in the tank?

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Amphrites
8 minutes ago, Clown79 said:

The bacteria won't die, it takes drying out rock, chemicals, a screw up to kill it.

 

There are lots of fishless tanks out there.

 

Adding ammonia to a cycled tank will kill it.

 

Are there any corals or cuc in the tank?

I wasn't planning on dosing enough to get a ppm reading mind you, just a controlled dose to replicate a bioload, if possible, after-all the cycle is just the ability to process ammonia and keep it below hobby-kit detectible levels right?

 

At the moment I have a cleaner ship who'll continue to be fed alongside a handful of hermits, and a handful of corals, mostly picky or disinterested eaters though so target feeding isn't super-likely.

 

I don't fancy the idea of aggressive ghost feeding just to rot things out, and I'm not sure I can tolerate the stink factor of dropping a shrimp in the overflow lol.

 

But I really would prefer to keep the tank completely ready for fish since I now have three in qt.

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Clown79
5 hours ago, Amphrites said:

I wasn't planning on dosing enough to get a ppm reading mind you, just a controlled dose to replicate a bioload, if possible, after-all the cycle is just the ability to process ammonia and keep it below hobby-kit detectible levels right?

 

At the moment I have a cleaner ship who'll continue to be fed alongside a handful of hermits, and a handful of corals, mostly picky or disinterested eaters though so target feeding isn't super-likely.

 

I don't fancy the idea of aggressive ghost feeding just to rot things out, and I'm not sure I can tolerate the stink factor of dropping a shrimp in the overflow lol.

 

But I really would prefer to keep the tank completely ready for fish since I now have three in qt.

If you have a shrimp in there and rocks, other than feeding the shrimp, there is nothing to do.

 

The bacteria won't die.

 

Adding any amount of ammonia is not advisable, especially with life in it.

 

Ammonia dosing is only to be done with dry rock when the tank hasn't established a bio filter or life present

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Amphrites

Fair enough, I'll just have to stagger things out of QT and feed light, appreciate your time!

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mcarroll
On 9/4/2020 at 11:22 PM, Amphrites said:

Odd questions I know, but I can't seem to track down much quality information.

Enter the waybackmachine and recall the basics of startup when using the natural method.  

 

It takes "so long" (30-40 days) starting off with a brand new "sterile" tank because there is such a small "seed" culture of bacteria....only that from your fingerprints, the dust in the air, etc.

 

But once that bacteria is growing and a critical mass is achieved, the bacteria have geometric multiplication rates in their favor vs ammonia spikes.

 

Ammonia spikes are pretty common...they accompany every feeding.  (Even the fish have compensating mechanisms for dealing with these kinds of spikes.)

 

Nitrifying bacteria are adapted to these kinds of spikes.

 

On 9/5/2020 at 11:03 AM, Amphrites said:

At the moment I have a cleaner ship who'll continue to be fed alongside a handful of hermits, and a handful of corals, mostly picky or disinterested eaters though so target feeding isn't super-likely.

As long as you keep your arthropods fed, the tank will be happy....bacteria will persevere at critical mass.  You should be able to be casual about it.

 

On 9/5/2020 at 11:03 AM, Amphrites said:

I don't fancy the idea of aggressive ghost feeding just to rot things out

ghost feeding = over feeding = rotting things out

 

I like that equivalence.  LOL. who would want any of those in their tank?!

 

On 9/5/2020 at 5:52 PM, Amphrites said:

Fair enough, I'll just have to stagger things out of QT and feed light, appreciate your time!

Good move.

 

Assuming they're in a pretty comfy QT so the extra time won't be a problem, staggering them would be a good idea for more than just the ammonia concern.

 

If they're cramped in QT, then doing a bulk transfer might be preferable....just have an ammonia badge and ammonia neutralizer like AmmoLock on hand just in case. Still doubtful to me that those things would be needed....but like leaving the house with an umbrella on a cloudy day....

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Tamberav

I have a conditioning tank set up as a DT with plenty of corals. It goes long periods (fallow) without fish or even feeding then sudden influx of the next batch of fish again. It is no issue at all for an established tank. 

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