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dnadrifter

7g Fish with a Good Bladder

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dnadrifter

Hi all,

 

Considering putting a fish in my 7g tank.  What are my choices, if any, for one with a well developed swim bladder that will actually swim around the tank?  I thought about a Court Jester Goby, but they seem to require algae and vegetation to snack on constantly?   Could go with a filefish, but don't really want it jumping out cause it feel uncomfortable.  Not super excited about neon gobies. 

 

Any often overlooked fish recommendations?

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mipster

Green banded Goby?

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dnadrifter
50 minutes ago, mipster said:

Green banded Goby?

I like the way they look but don’t they just kinds hop along the bottom instead of swimming?

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Clown79

If you want a swimmer, get a damsel. They swim all the time and are very pretty.

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mipster
1 minute ago, Clown79 said:

If you want a swimmer, get a damsel

Isn't a damsel too big for a 7 gallon tank?

 

The problem with most fish for that size of tank is they aren't big free swimmers I think from what I've seen or read. Maybe a pink streaked wrasse which I've always wanted but I've never seen their swimming pattern in person.

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Clown79
5 minutes ago, mipster said:

Isn't a damsel too big for a 7 gallon tank?

 

The problem with most fish for that size of tank is they aren't big free swimmers I think from what I've seen or read. Maybe a pink streaked wrasse which I've always wanted but I've never seen their swimming pattern in person.

A yellowtail doesn't get that big and damsels are hearty fish. A lone it should be fine.

 

Other than a damsel, a clown, firefish, small blenny, or a goby are other options.

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mipster

Check out iGreen's guide:

 

 

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dnadrifter

Yeah, I have looked at that guide pretty extensively.  Recommendations for a 7g aren’t much different than a 0.5 g  to be honest.  There is really only a significant jump at 10 gal.   I have to also consider mine is an AIO with a non-display area, although is pretty small compared to some.   The main display is about 11 x 11 x 9.

 

Thanks for the discussion clown and mister....appreciate the additional thoughts.   No doing anything immediately and I may just not do a fish....we will see.

 

Gonna look at damsels a bit to learn more.

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GraniteReefer
2 hours ago, mipster said:

Isn't a damsel too big for a 7 gallon tank?

If you want to keep a fish in 7g you are going to have to disregard most retailers recommended minimun gallonage.  I think a damsel would be ok and fit into your desired niche, once I had a Talbots damsel active and pretty.

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Clown79
19 minutes ago, dnadrifter said:

Yeah, I have looked at that guide pretty extensively.  Recommendations for a 7g aren’t much different than a 0.5 g  to be honest.  There is really only a significant jump at 10 gal.   I have to also consider mine is an AIO with a non-display area, although is pretty small compared to some.   The main display is about 11 x 11 x 9.

 

Thanks for the discussion clown and mister....appreciate the additional thoughts.   No doing anything immediately and I may just not do a fish....we will see.

 

Gonna look at damsels a bit to learn more.

Check out the pico competition that happened last yr. 2.5g.

 

Many of us added fish.

 

I had a damsel in mine.

 

I had a bicolor blenny in my 5.5g

 

Some fish absolutely cannot be in smaller tanks while others you can. It all depends on needs, the aquascape, other inhabitants, and care of the tank.

 

A yellowtail gets to 2", I think a 7g can be fine if no other fish are added. Definitely a swimmer and the blue/yellow will stand out.

 

 

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Tired

I wouldn't put a damsel in a 2.5gal (except a baby, as a temporary inhabitant), but a 7gal should be fine. You'll want your rockwork to have lots of space for it to dip in and out of, and have plenty of open water space as well. Yellowtails don't get large and will often stay in one portion of a larger tank anyway. I had one in an 8gal cube for awhile, no problems. 

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Clown79
21 minutes ago, Tired said:

I wouldn't put a damsel in a 2.5gal (except a baby, as a temporary inhabitant), but a 7gal should be fine. You'll want your rockwork to have lots of space for it to dip in and out of, and have plenty of open water space as well. Yellowtails don't get large and will often stay in one portion of a larger tank anyway. I had one in an 8gal cube for awhile, no problems. 

I did it when it was small with the knowledge it wasn't a permanent home.

 

It's been rehomed as I shut down the tank after the contest. 

 

In this hobby, one has to understand that at one point or another you may have to rehome livestock/corals when owning a nano because a lot of stuff outgrows a small tank and quickly.

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Tired

See, that's reasonable. However, if you only have a fish in an aquarium temporarily, I think it's very important to say that. I also think that, as a general rule, fish that will outgrow a tank shouldn't be recommended for that tank. I mean, I've seen an inch-long hippo tang at my LFS, but I still would never suggest one for a nano tank. 

IMO, people should only buy fish they can reasonably expect to house for that fish's whole life. If you have a 5gal tank and are in the middle of setting up a 30gal, buying a baby that'll outgrow your 5 is different than if you just have the 5. Things with brains should be moved to new tanks as few times as possible, basically. Things without brains, like corals, it doesn't matter. 

 

I think the yellowtail damsel is probably the best active fish for a tank that size. Those micro dartfish are pretty active, I think, but they need a LOT of feeding. 

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Clown79
37 minutes ago, Tired said:

See, that's reasonable. However, if you only have a fish in an aquarium temporarily, I think it's very important to say that. I also think that, as a general rule, fish that will outgrow a tank shouldn't be recommended for that tank. I mean, I've seen an inch-long hippo tang at my LFS, but I still would never suggest one for a nano tank. 

IMO, people should only buy fish they can reasonably expect to house for that fish's whole life. If you have a 5gal tank and are in the middle of setting up a 30gal, buying a baby that'll outgrow your 5 is different than if you just have the 5. Things with brains should be moved to new tanks as few times as possible, basically. Things without brains, like corals, it doesn't matter. 

 

I think the yellowtail damsel is probably the best active fish for a tank that size. Those micro dartfish are pretty active, I think, but they need a LOT of feeding. 

I did say it, in my thread and directed the op to read the threads of the contest because I wasn't alone in adding a fish to rehome it.

 

It happens, sometimes you have to move things.

Sometimes,  its just from simply upgrading and or shutting down, even moving houses. So it's pretty inevitable that a fish may be rehomed.

 

I don't see it as a negative or even a traumatic experience if done properly and with certain livestock. 

 

 

Collection of fish and shipping them across the world is far more traumatic and many losses involved...but we still buy the fish for our own purposes.

 

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Tired

I just think it's reasonable to say "I kept this baby fish temporarily in this size tank" instead of "I kept this fish in this size tank". I like to always be really clear about things, and you can't guarantee that someone will read an entire second thread that mentions something important. 

 

Fish certainly do wind up being rehomed, but IMO it's preferable not to do so. I know people sometimes buy fish, keep them for a few months until they grow too large, then return them, and I'm really not a fan of the practice. I also worry that someone might buy their first fish, get attached to it, and not want to rehome it when it gets too large- I've seen that happen a time or two.

Unexpected shifts, or moving your fish to a larger tank, are one thing. But if I were moving to Hawaii in 5 months and wouldn't be able to take any fish with me, it would be a bit irresponsible of me to buy a new tank and set it up with half a dozen fish, knowing I won't be able to care for them. No need to send them back to the LFS so they can be exposed to all those pathogens after a move for a second time. It also lends itself to the fish being a commodity. Now, it is an ornamental animal that we're treating as an ornamental animal, but it still deserves to be respected as an animal. I think that includes only getting animals you can reasonably expect to care for their whole lives. If you disagree, well, fair enough. 

(Corals don't count because they may as well be plants, as far as awareness goes. I have no problems with someone buying a plant and then selling it when it gets too big.)

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