Jump to content
mfield16

Inherited an Overstocked, Disgusting Tank!

Recommended Posts

Seadragon
5 minutes ago, mfield16 said:

@Seadragon Do you have a pic of the Chaeto / magnet setup? I browsed your office tank thread but must've missed that.

 

Sure, here we go, Chaeto and the magnetic clip is on the bottom right side:

Ray_Day112-1.thumb.JPG.7ee6b47bc0ac03d30

 

And here on the bottom left side:

Ray_Day112-2.thumb.JPG.9d5aba8d84c05048a

 

There's also some Chaeto growing beneath the Pom Pom Xenia in the 2nd picture.  I actually remove it every now and then and eventually it comes back like that so it does grow.

Share this post


Link to post
Clown79
8 minutes ago, Seadragon said:

Better yet, I'll give you just 1 of the 49,400 links for your reading pleasure:

 

"Xenia, as many of you are well aware, is a terrific nutrient exporter. To be exact its around 500% more effective then macroalgae at removing nutrients from your aquarium.
Alot of people don't keep xenia strictly because it can quickly reproduce and overgrow a tank and other corals. Especially in a tank with large amounts of DOCs xenia can quickly get out of hand on your rock work and pose issues for your tank. You can prune it just like you would a macroalgae, however this can get troublesome as every little head which sneaks away via the water column and finds a nice little nook will sprout itself into a new tree.
From personal Exp and conversations with friends, Ive found a nifty way to grow xenia safely in your aquarium without worrying about pruning or dealing with real estate issues in and on your rock work while all the time enjoying the nutrient exporting ability of this nifty coral.
My father, (at one point and time), actually plumbed a main reef display into a secondary 30 gallon reef which was completely a xenia forest. The nutrient exporting capabilites was outstanding. The main issue being the large amount of food which was having to be fed to supply enough food to maintain both the coral in the main display + the entire secondary tank of xenia. This became an issue which had more risks then rewards and my dad quickly went back to a fuge.
Rather then growing your Xenia on your rock, why not grow it on your glass? Its out of the way of other corals, cannot block light, cannot take up real estate, and still serves the purpose to export excess nutrients from the water column. Its not difficult in any way, all it requires is a little scrubbing with a toothbrush every other day. Xenia usually attaches fairly quickly to whatever object its placed next to, if you have a frag available and can suspend it horizontally against the glass safely without it falling for an extended period, then eventually it will attach itself to the glass and voila, you are good to go. Simply seek out any little xenia sprouts and scrub them off the rock with a clean toothbrush every now and again when you see them sprouting up and you are good to go.
If you already have Xenia in your tank and simply wish to know how to get it to grow on your glass so you can completely remove it from your rock, then this is how. I personally left at least 2 healthy trees on my rocks at all times without any pruning being done during the glass growing process. The other trees I cut, pruned, and scrubbed with a toothbrush until only a small amount of the trees remained on the rock. Eventually a spore you scrub off will attach to the glass and begin to grow. When you think it is of adequate size and definitely going to survive, then you can simply completely remove the rest of the trees on your rock. Congratulations, you now have a small forest growing on your glass which is pretty and serves a purpose.
Just an idea to throw out there for everyone." Source: https://forums.saltwaterfish.com/index.php?threads/using-xenia-as-nutrient-exporter-tips-hints-on-growing-and-placement.383738/

 

You seem to only believe info that pertains to your particular research and set ups while refuting all other research, experiences, and studies.

 

 

I will not be engaged in a who's "right", "my experience is more valid" conversation/argument.

 

To the OP. Do a lot of detailed research and come up with a conclusion that best meets your needs.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
mfield16
Just now, Clown79 said:

To the OP. Do a lot of detailed research and come up with a conclusion that best meets your needs.

 

Copy that! I appreciate the back and forth though! 

 

1 minute ago, Seadragon said:

 

Sure, here we go, Chaeto and the magnetic clip is on the bottom right side:

 

Thanks! Just a clip. I was thinking something more intricate. K.I.S.S.!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Garf

The two clowns should be fine in the 13.5  You should be able to add another smaller fish, but unfortunately the list of livestock you have there is limiting. If you had to keep one, I would think the larger/less shy firefish, but even then, who knows what your clowns will do to it when they get bigger.  

 

To address the large bioload until your can get them to your buddy, do frequent smaller water changes (less stress on fish) and vacuum the detritus off the sand. Add in a cleanup crew as soon as you can, perhaps buying more than you need and getting your buddy to split the pack.

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Seadragon
2 minutes ago, Clown79 said:

You seem to only believe info that pertains to your particular research and set ups while refuting all other research, experiences, and studies.

 

I will not be engaged in a who's "right", "my experience is more valid" conversation/argument.

 

To the OP. Do a lot of detailed research and come up with a conclusion that best meets your needs.

 

5 minutes ago, Clown79 said:

It's made no difference to nutrient levels in or out of my tanks.

 

My tanks have the same nutrient levels.

 

1 has dragons breath and a crap ton of xenia, the other had neither.

 

 

There is a lot of info on forums that isn't exactly proven but belief.

 

Like xenia like low light and high nutrients. 

 

It actually grows even in low nutrient tanks and loves light.

 

The pumping action only occurs in low flow areas.

 

Just like the theory that palytoxin only exists in paly's and zoas. Scientific research has proven that a lot of soft corals have palytoxin, xenia being on that list.

 

That's not true at all.  I have a philosophy in life.  "Try everything at least once" within reason.  I did my research and I tried macroalgae and Xenia and it's working fine for me.  I believe that you had issues and you have your reasons.  I know you want me to find some scientific evidence to back-up my claim which you'll just refute with "well, it didn't work for me!", but I'm not actually trying to change your mind, I'm only stating what works for me and why I believe it is.  The most evidence you gave me was "people on the forums", while I'm giving you actual links of thousands of other peoples' experiences which you can see for yourself.

 

It should not be hard to believe that any coral that grows fast has to be using up nutrients within the water.  How else is it growing so fast, magic?

Share this post


Link to post
mfield16

CUC is on the way. Unfortunately I did not buy more than I needed. Great idea though. Too late!

Share this post


Link to post
Clown79
15 minutes ago, mfield16 said:

CUC is on the way. Unfortunately I did not buy more than I needed. Great idea though. Too late!

It's a good idea to add as needed because they can starve and die

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Clown79
33 minutes ago, Seadragon said:

 

That's not true at all.  I have a philosophy in life.  "Try everything at least once" within reason.  I did my research and I tried macroalgae and Xenia and it's working fine for me.  I believe that you had issues and you have your reasons.  I know you want me to find some scientific evidence to back-up my claim which you'll just refute with "well, it didn't work for me!", but I'm not actually trying to change your mind, I'm only stating what works for me and why I believe it is.  The most evidence you gave me was "people on the forums", while I'm giving you actual links of thousands of other peoples' experiences which you can see for yourself.

 

It should not be hard to believe that any coral that grows fast has to be using up nutrients within the water.  How else is it growing so fast, magic?

I don't provides all the links to everything I have researched and read over 10yrs. I am not sitting online for hrs to prove things when others 

can do their own research. Using Google and the search function on here is easy for everyone to do

 

 

If we all believed everything on the forums

 

We wouldn't have nano tanks, we would still be running systems with 0 nutrients, only halides can grow corals, bristle worms are killers, etc etc. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Seadragon
21 minutes ago, Clown79 said:

I don't provides all the links to everything I have researched and read over 10yrs. I am not sitting online for hrs to prove things when others 

can do their own research. Using Google and the search function on here is easy for everyone to do

 

 

If we all believed everything on the forums

 

We wouldn't have nano tanks, we would still be running systems with 0 nutrients, only halides can grow corals, bristle worms are killers, etc etc. 

 

That's the spirit.  Go do your own research and use google with the search function.  Why even ask others to provide proof.

Share this post


Link to post
Clown79
16 minutes ago, Seadragon said:

 

That's the spirit.  Go do your own research and use google with the search function.  Why even ask others to provide proof.

That is the spirit.

Not everyone has the time to sit there and do hours of research for others posting pages of links when they are readily available.

 

People should be doing their own research, it's how you learn. Its 1 of the things we recommend for a very valid purpose.

 

I spend a lot of time on Nano helping others 15,738 posts- the majority of those posts is  helping others.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Seadragon
9 minutes ago, Clown79 said:

That is the spirit.

Not everyone has the time to sit there and do hours of research for others posting pages of links when they are readily available.

 

People should be doing their own research, it's how you learn. Its 1 of the things we recommend for a very valid purpose.

 

I spend a lot of time on Nano helping others 15,738 posts- the majority of those posts is  helping others.

 

 

 

I 100% agree with that.

 

Still ❤️ Chaeto too. 😉

Share this post


Link to post
FISHnChix

Just to add my 2 cents. I too believe that running a macro like cheato in a nano tank is not a good idea for 90 percent of nano reefers.. simply cheato is too damn good at removing phos and nitrate and will most like deplete your system of nutrients.. will it lead to dinos? I dunno in my experience it will just die first and your nutrients will go back up, but maybe if you kept adding it after it dies it could deplete your levels enough to encourage dino growth..🤷‍♂️.

 

 

I would only run macro if I had a super heavy feeding demand that led to constant high nutrients like maybe a sea horse tank or a tank heavily stocked with nps coral... 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Seadragon
2 minutes ago, FISHnChix said:

cheato is too damn good at removing phos and nitrate


God bless Chaeto.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Amphrites

...
Nitrate and Nitrite are both exceedingly benign in saltwater systems due to the nature of actual, real, chemistry.
There are reef systems with 100+ Nitrate levels, WWC has a display which is over 50 and full of SPS.

However there are still too many fish in that tank, you've been pointed in the correct direction for rehoming, the sponges and such from the older filter systems are just detritus traps and nitrate factories.

Skimmers don't lower nutrients they prevent them by removing organics from the water column, both carbon and skimmers -alongside select biological-export such a benthic sponges - also remove organic carbons which otherwise dead-end and accumulate in our systems.

There's not much to say past a simple point, be careful about googling exactly the question you want to ask and only looking for the answers you want to see. I would try to find some published books, trusted websites and sources, or extremely-experienced and well-known/trusted individuals within the reefkeeping community and get your information from/emulate them. 
Google has spent an inordinate amount of time ensuring that, if you ask any question, you will find the answer you are looking for, it's only recently -due to interventions from movements like "Time Well Spent"- that Silicon Valley has started to consider providing people with correct answers instead of what will keep them on webpages longer.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Seadragon
14 minutes ago, Amphrites said:

Nitrate and Nitrite are both exceedingly benign in saltwater systems due to the nature of actual, real, chemistry.
There are reef systems with 100+ Nitrate levels, WWC has a display which is over 50 and full of SPS.

 

I wouldn't recommend to anyone that reef systems with over 100+ PPM Nitrate levels is safe.  A lot of test kits and websites state it's unsafe once you start surpassing 80+ PPM for Nitrates.  As for Nitrite levels, it's stressful to the tank inhabitants from 1-3 PPM, and then becomes dangerous at 5+ PPM.

 

If you want to take the risk and pose harm or death to your tank inhabitants, that's fine, but I wouldn't recommend having any Nitrites or 80+ PPM for Nitrates to anyone, let alone beginners to the hobby.  I think that's just wrong and can lead to a tank crash eventually.

Share this post


Link to post
Tamberav

I would get the chocolate star to the LFS, if it perished, that would be a lot of dying tissue in a small tank. 

 

Whether the fish are in danger or not depends on if your new rock and old filter can reliably process ammonia. Under normal conditions, you would probably end up with a field of GHA if nutrients rise.....which would keep the nutrients well in acceptable range for fish. 

 

Oxygen can be another potential hazard. If the power went out or a breaker tripped, a small overstocked tank will certainly run out of oxygen faster. Things to be wary of until you can re-home the fish.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...