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Amphrites

Indirect Pump water-heating

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Amphrites

Read through some more horror stories from heater-failures today and it made me want to attempt a solution.
I was thinking of using 15 or so feet of H2 PTFE Fluerotherm run into a cheap-insulated lunchbox or cooler (maybe just one of the cheap styrofoam boxes with a water-proof coating or bag inside) of around 1-2 gallon capacity which would house a 50-100gph pump and the heaters from the display. The line would then be run out to the rear-chamber of the display-tank and through a dozen or two feet of coiling, as you would see in a chiller, before returning to the reservoir to be re-heated. I see no reason why the material wouldn't be reef-safe (since it's food-safe and used to coat pans) and it's getting in the ballpark of having the same thermal-conductivity as some metals (while still being an inert electrical-insulator).

I figure the relatively-small volume and flow-rate means that the tank wouldn't just be protected from shorts, but also from overheating - with the potential to actually probe the reservoir-itself to a kill-switch for redundancy.
And since I only need to keep things around 6-10F above ambient I'm not exactly trying to boil things.

My two main Ideas for operation would be:
-Keep the reservoir hot, around 85+ F and run the pump on a temp-probe in the display, the downside to this of course is that it would react sluggishly and potentially-cause consistent, small temperature-swings.

-The second idea is, if possible, to match the display-tank's goal-temp (75F) and run the pump 24/7 during the winter. If there is enough mass and energy being imparted into the system then I wouldn't have to worry about swings at all. The downside is that this method would likely need to approach the peak flow-rate for airline tubing (around 150 gph) and has the potential to underheat the system if the ambient temperature falls too low (in which case I could run my redundant heater on a probe and have it kick-in to further heat the reservoir's water).

Any insane folks out there care to entertain my crazy ramblings for a second lol?
Would love feedback, couldn't find too many folks trying to DIY heater-coils, just allot of chillers haha.

And, while I could probably set up the math for mass-flow-rate --> heat transfer, it doesn't really take into account the liquid cooling in the system itself and is an absolute-headache, so I would probably go the trail-and-error route instead.

@Wonderboy Your tanks are DIY haevens, what do you think?

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Clown79

Why not buy a heater controller?

Sometimes heaters go and it can be due to user as well as malfunction.

There are also ppl who have used cheap heaters for yrs and yrs with no issue.

 

 

There are so many horror stories for everything reef, heaters, sumps, pumps, the tanks themselves. Allergies, infections, palytoxin.

 

I started questioning if I even wanted one after the stories I read. Lol.

  • Haha 1

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Amphrites
11 hours ago, Clown79 said:

Why not buy a heater controller?

Sometimes heaters go and it can be due to user as well as malfunction.

There are also ppl who have used cheap heaters for yrs and yrs with no issue.

 

 

There are so many horror stories for everything reef, heaters, sumps, pumps, the tanks themselves. Allergies, infections, palytoxin.

 

I started questioning if I even wanted one after the stories I read. Lol.

I have all the parts laying around save the cooler and the teflon tubing, seemed like a fun little side project XD
Also worth noting a temp controller will not intervene in the event of a voltage-leak (well it might spazz out and turn things off and on super-fast lol).
So this build would have the advantage of ensuring voltage leaks just turn the reservoir into a toaster-bathtub situation and not the tank.

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Wonderboy

Sorry, I have been barely able to get on NR - been so busy with life. @Amphrites, you definitely got my attention - Look who's the mad scientist now hahaha 😆 - it's a very interesting idea; it could possibly be a way to incorporate a high metabolism 'fuge enabling heavier feeding on small systems, too - I think I may need a diagram to better understand the potentials

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Amphrites

Mad scientist? Potential? Hoo-boy you've got me overestimated, all I'm looking at throwing together is the opposite of a closed-loop chiller/cooler lol.
Heating elements instead of heatsinks and/or fans.
In essence it's still technically a cooler, but it's using the display's tank-water to cool the water in the pipes running from the reservoir (which would then be re-heated).

But if you insist, here's an awful doodle.

IMG_20191210_183015.jpg.15207d581f556646ffcfc079ad6a9104.jpg

 

Two different routes of operation would depend-entirely on performance:
-The first would have a probe in the display tank and keep the reservoir on the left a few degrees hotter than the display and toggle the 100 GPH pump based on the display's temperature.
-The second would just keep the pump on and the reservoir @ or near the display tank's target-temperature, relying on heat-exchange to maintain it.

Nothing too fancy.

The real issue is that it would likely require far too-much volume in the coils to effectively-heat the water much at all, it would really depend on the room's ambient temperature and it certainly wouldn't be efficient.

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Amphrites

So the gist of my lazy math would be that the display has around 650"^2 of surface area, without taking into account the insulative-properties of glass I would need to match that in order to "counteract" the cooling of the tank with a simple "goal-temp" (it is SO much more complicated than this, but it hopefully gives a nice ballpark). 
My best guess is with 5x turnover in the back I'd need around 130"^2 of tubing, so around 10 feet all coiled-up back there.

Seems doable, however I doubt a 100gph pump could handle that head-pressure, but finding one which can be inline and setting it up to pull the water would probably-work.

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DSA65PRO

Get a couple Aqueon preset heaters, they will maintain your tank between 77.4** and 78.2** F use a Hester controller as a safety. ** this is the widest temperature swing I’ve ever seen, they maintains a much closer swing. Also they supposedly have a safety thermostat in them. Small footprint is a bonus too!

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