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Reefjunkye

My black ice turning into black face clown

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Reefjunkye

Does anyone know or have experience clownfish turning darker/blacker? And no, he’s not hosting anything to be stung. His face and fins are turning black... used to look like my new long fin black ice color before... 

49034658817_99125df3db_b.jpg

 

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Tired

That's something that clowns are known to do as they age, I think.

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seabass
4 minutes ago, Tired said:

That's something that clowns are known to do as they age, I think.

Yep.

 

Here's a juvenile Black and White Ocellaris, which will eventually lose all of its orange:

Juvenile
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j.falk

That's what happens with the black ice clowns.  Nothing you can do about it.  They all change to some degree.

 

All of my SA black ice clowns eventually turned black and white.

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Tamberav
3 hours ago, Reefjunkye said:

Does anyone know or have experience clownfish turning darker/blacker? And no, he’s not hosting anything to be stung. His face and fins are turning black... used to look like my new long fin black ice color before... 

49034658817_99125df3db_b.jpg

 

Yes, I have seen them sold as "blacker ice" sometimes.

 

Nice pair!

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Reefjunkye

Thanks for the input guys. Now, I have another question. The female had laid eggs with her ex partner. Would she still laid eggs with her new mate? 

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Tired

Yes. Clownfish take mates because of an instinctive drive to breed.

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Matteo

Blackface? Racist ass clown... 

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Reefjunkye

Lol ...and yellow faced is not? Lol

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Tired

Ya know, I don't think there are any clownfish in Africa for this one to try and impersonate. 

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jservedio

They tend to get darker as they age, but lighting plays a role as well - not in their actual color, but the color that your eyes and camera sees. Usually, the heavier the blue spectrum, the blacker and darker they look. Under sunlight, my plain old perculas look almost entirely orange like they should (though a bit faded from age). Under the heavy UV and RB of my LEDs, they look almost like black and white clowns with their undersides being a dark orange.

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Matteo
28 minutes ago, jservedio said:

They tend to get darker as they age, but lighting plays a role as well - not in their actual color, but the color that your eyes and camera sees. Usually, the heavier the blue spectrum, the blacker and darker they look. Under sunlight, my plain old perculas look almost entirely orange like they should (though a bit faded from age). Under the heavy UV and RB of my LEDs, they look almost like black and white clowns with their undersides being a dark orange.

Ah yes the never ending perfect balance for coral illumination and fish illumination 

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