Jump to content
Cisconav

Weird spots on my sand

Recommended Posts

Cisconav

I have weird spots on my sand that almost look like something is digging.  I have a new tank with just live rock. I tried to add fish but they were killed by a fire worm I didn’t know was living in my rock. Any was able to get the worms out but haven’t tried to add fish yet as I want to make sure I don’t make the same mistake. Any ideas what it could be? 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Cisconav

Share this post


Link to post
Thrassian Atoll

What are you using for sand?

Share this post


Link to post
Cisconav

I am using live sand. I got mostly white but mixed in black to give it a different look. 

Share this post


Link to post
patback
2 hours ago, Cisconav said:

I have weird spots on my sand that almost look like something is digging.  I have a new tank with just live rock. I tried to add fish but they were killed by a fire worm I didn’t know was living in my rock. Any was able to get the worms out but haven’t tried to add fish yet as I want to make sure I don’t make the same mistake. Any ideas what it could be? 

 

 

 

Fireworms wont kill fish.  

Is the wierd spots the grey areas, and if you disturb the water above it, is it dusty/silty?

Looks to be detritus that was inside the rock.  Worms,pods, and flow could have pushed ot all out.  

Share this post


Link to post
Cisconav

I am using live sand. I got mostly white but mixed in black to give it a different look. 

Share this post


Link to post
Cisconav

I know fire worms don’t usually kill fish. I have read that there have been times where they have struck a fish and killed them. I don’t know what else it could have been. I had my water tested with zero issues or concerns. I put two clown fish in there and for the first day they were good. No issues or sign of distress. Only other things in the tank were the live rock and what I thought were small snails that hitchhiked. That night after the lights went my wife came home and found one of our clown fish struggling like she was paralyzed. Right behind her was this fire worm that I had never seen before. Mind you the tank had been setup with just live rock for over a month. At this time I was able to get the worms out since I found out there were two. I thought we were good to go but then I noticed that all the snails have disappeared. Water still tested normal at all levels. A week goes by then the last clown fish is doing the same thing and I see a tiny fire worm on its body. I was not able to catch this one and have just left the tank running since. I am not sure how to get rid of them at this point without just dumping the water and cleaning the rocks and starting over. 

Does it not seem like the fish were killed by the worms? If not what else could it have been? Thanks for any advice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Clown79

Did the worm look like this?

 

The fish could have been sick and the worm just doing its job.

 

There are only certain polychaete worms that will go after fish.

 

Do you have a pic?

 

You can try to make a bottle trap to catch one.

images.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
mcarroll
On 9/2/2019 at 8:45 PM, Cisconav said:

I have a new tank with just live rock.

On 9/2/2019 at 8:45 PM, Cisconav said:

I tried to add fish

On 9/3/2019 at 8:04 AM, Cisconav said:

Mind you the tank had been setup with just live rock for over a month.

 

That's no time at all in the scheme of things.

 

Ideally this is when you would have started adding small cleanup crew slowly, and maybe a coral or two, to get the ball rolling.

 

After another month or so if things are going smoothly is when you might consider adding your first fish. If possible, it would be best to start with only one.

 

Then wait at least another month so you can observe how the tank reacts to the fish food now being added as well as how the fish reacts to the tank.  

 

This will also allow you time to adjust the cleanup crew if needed, and to guage the effect of those changes on the tank, etc, so you know things are right before adding the next round of organisms.

 

I'd try to add a coral or two during this time as well....wouldn't be a bad idea to give it it's own wait/observation time to monitor for problems and to adjust tank chemistry before the next round, but one or two new corals usually is such a small impact to the tank that further wait beyond that for the fish additions isn't always needed.

 

The tank could easily be 6 months old or more before the clowns got in there, and that wouldn't be going too slow.

 

On 9/2/2019 at 8:45 PM, Cisconav said:

I have weird spots on my sand that almost look like something is digging.

"Wormsign." 😉 You are correct.

 

There are a bazillion types of worms living on/in live rock...all of which can be expected to be beneficial.  Exceptions are that rare.  

 

Those "spots" are where worms have moved out into the sandbed you provided and made burrows.  You just have to take care of them and they might continue living there...and maybe even breeding and spreading.  (They are typically extremely fragile and do not tolerate any significant disturbance of the substrate they are in.  These kinds of worms usually end up getting wiped out due to lack of stability in most folks tanks.)

 

This is one milestone in your tank's maturation process....things are just starting to get happy in your tank!

 

On 9/3/2019 at 8:04 AM, Cisconav said:

I thought we were good to go but then I noticed that all the snails have disappeared. Water still tested normal at all levels.

We need more pics of the tank, the fish and the worms you're seeing and more info like the test results you mentioned or we can't do much more than say "Oh that's too bad."  With more info we can probably offer more helpful guidance.

 

Here's what I can say.

 

The info on "fireworms" out there written after the early 2000's seems to be predominantly very inflammatory and pretty much oriented toward fear mongering newbies.  Look for books by Calfo or Fenner or reefkeeping.com articles by Ron Shimek for a more realistic set of information.

 

The odds of a worm being what took down your fish are VERY LOW unless you actually saw the attack in real time.

 

If you didn't see the attack in real time, then your fish just died and the worm just showed up to do its cleanup job.  

 

The fish dying on it's own from no apparent cause (cyanide collection is more common than is should be) is infinitely more likely than having a predatory worm.  

 

I would try to let the idea of predatory worms in your tank rest for now.  It's far more likely they are just your cleanup crew at work.  (Nutrient recycling is actually the reef's main superpower...and these guys are a fairly big part of that.)  🙂 

 

QUESTIONS

Let us know the rest of the info you have including the testing data and pics of the fish or worms in question if you have any. 👌

 

Can you also post a full tank shot with daylights on?

 

How has algae growth been in the tank?   Any so far?  What types?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Clown79
8 hours ago, mcarroll said:

 

That's no time at all in the scheme of things.

 

Ideally this is when you would have started adding small cleanup crew slowly, and maybe a coral or two, to get the ball rolling.

 

After another month or so if things are going smoothly is when you might consider adding your first fish. If possible, it would be best to start with only one.

 

Then wait at least another month so you can observe how the tank reacts to the fish food now being added as well as how the fish reacts to the tank.  

 

This will also allow you time to adjust the cleanup crew if needed, and to guage the effect of those changes on the tank, etc, so you know things are right before adding the next round of organisms.

 

I'd try to add a coral or two during this time as well....wouldn't be a bad idea to give it it's own wait/observation time to monitor for problems and to adjust tank chemistry before the next round, but one or two new corals usually is such a small impact to the tank that further wait beyond that for the fish additions isn't always needed.

 

The tank could easily be 6 months old or more before the clowns got in there, and that wouldn't be going too slow.

 

"Wormsign." 😉 You are correct.

 

There are a bazillion types of worms living on/in live rock...all of which can be expected to be beneficial.  Exceptions are that rare.  

 

Those "spots" are where worms have moved out into the sandbed you provided and made burrows.  You just have to take care of them and they might continue living there...and maybe even breeding and spreading.  (They are typically extremely fragile and do not tolerate any significant disturbance of the substrate they are in.  These kinds of worms usually end up getting wiped out due to lack of stability in most folks tanks.)

 

This is one milestone in your tank's maturation process....things are just starting to get happy in your tank!

 

We need more pics of the tank, the fish and the worms you're seeing and more info like the test results you mentioned or we can't do much more than say "Oh that's too bad."  With more info we can probably offer more helpful guidance.

 

Here's what I can say.

 

The info on "fireworms" out there written after the early 2000's seems to be predominantly very inflammatory and pretty much oriented toward fear mongering newbies.  Look for books by Calfo or Fenner or reefkeeping.com articles by Ron Shimek for a more realistic set of information.

 

The odds of a worm being what took down your fish are VERY LOW unless you actually saw the attack in real time.

 

If you didn't see the attack in real time, then your fish just died and the worm just showed up to do its cleanup job.  

 

The fish dying on it's own from no apparent cause (cyanide collection is more common than is should be) is infinitely more likely than having a predatory worm.  

 

I would try to let the idea of predatory worms in your tank rest for now.  It's far more likely they are just your cleanup crew at work.  (Nutrient recycling is actually the reef's main superpower...and these guys are a fairly big part of that.)  🙂 

 

QUESTIONS

Let us know the rest of the info you have including the testing data and pics of the fish or worms in question if you have any. 👌

 

Can you also post a full tank shot with daylights on?

 

How has algae growth been in the tank?   Any so far?  What types?

Fear mongering is huge in this hobby. Everything from rocks, hitch hikers, products, equipment.

 

It's often made to be more difficult than it needs to be 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recommended Discussions

×
×
  • Create New...