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Amphrites

Tiny Mushroom eating worm

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Amphrites

I don't have any pictures as I was lucky enough just to spot the bugger, but a small reddish-tannish worm, with no apparent bristles and no large head antennae I could see, slowly came out of the rock a newly purchased mushroom coral came in on. It extended some small mandibles and tore a big enough chunk out of the baby-mushroom to literally tear its' disk. The mushroom is now dead, but I guess I was wondering if any other folks had similar experiences with such animals, it was very thin and quite small still, nothing like the eunice worms you typically hear about and it went after the mushroom in the afternoon, so it wouldn't appear to be nocturnal either. 

The main reason I ask is that I initially tried to get rid of it just by cutting the half of the rock I spotted it on off entirely, in hindsight however I'm not sure whether that would have been enough since the animal could have been multiple inches long and retraced far into the center of the rock (though I didn't see any tubes for it after cutting the rock [rock is also generous, we're talking an inch, maybe two inch pebble here and a tiny-baby-shroom] may have seen parts of a dead shriveled worm in the rock a few days later, impossible to tell?)

So I guess my question would be, what're the chances it bailed into my rockwork after I disturbed its' home by cutting the rock, and I'll now have a nibbling-rampage to track (one of my euphyllia is going bailout atm actually with tears in its' flesh, so this might already be the case), or would these kinds of worms likely just sit put in their burrow and I likely either got rid of it when disposing of the shroom's corpse or when I actively tried to cut its' home off the pebble.

Probably inappropriate for this forum, but I just don't have enough hands-on experience to really have an answer for myself on this one, and I can't find too much information out there either. 

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WV Reefer
15 minutes ago, Amphrites said:

I don't have any pictures as I was lucky enough just to spot the bugger, but a small reddish-tannish worm, with no apparent bristles and no large head antennae I could see, slowly came out of the rock a newly purchased mushroom coral came in on. It extended some small mandibles and tore a big enough chunk out of the baby-mushroom to literally tear its' disk. The mushroom is now dead, but I guess I was wondering if any other folks had similar experiences with such animals, it was very thin and quite small still, nothing like the eunice worms you typically hear about and it went after the mushroom in the afternoon, so it wouldn't appear to be nocturnal either. 

The main reason I ask is that I initially tried to get rid of it just by cutting the half of the rock I spotted it on off entirely, in hindsight however I'm not sure whether that would have been enough since the animal could have been multiple inches long and retraced far into the center of the rock (though I didn't see any tubes for it after cutting the rock [rock is also generous, we're talking an inch, maybe two inch pebble here and a tiny-baby-shroom] may have seen parts of a dead shriveled worm in the rock a few days later, impossible to tell?)

So I guess my questions would be, chances it bailed into my rockwork after I disturbed its' home by cutting the rock, and I'll now have a nibbling-rampage to track (one of my euphyllia is going bailout atm actually with tears in its' flesh, so this might already be the case), or would these kinds of worms likely just sit put in their burrow and I likely either got rid of it when disposing of the yuma's corpse or when I actively tried to cut its' home off the pebble.

Probably inappropriate for this forum, but I just don't have enough hands-on experience to really have an answer for myself on this one, and I can't find too much information out there either. 

 

Thats crazy. 

 

My eunice worm would never fully leave his home base so hopefully you got what ever it was when you cut his house up. 

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WV Reefer

I was thinking about this last night......

 

what about a Medusa Worm?  They have been known to eat mushrooms and soft corals.  

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Amphrites

Hmm I don't think so, I hadn't even thought of the possibility... The mushrooms came from a breeder/propagator supposedly so it would be odd for there to be juvenile Medusa worms on the rocks... That said in an established and dirty tank, who knows... I'll have to keep an eye out one way or another, but even in a nano spotting animals this adept at staying out of sight is a matter of luck, time, and their unfortunate and inevitable size increases... 

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