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seabass

Microscope for reefing

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DSA65PRO

I got one from a Schools Direct sales many years ago that plugged into a computer. It no longer works that way, because computers no longer have that connection. I can still use the eye piece though. Jewelers lope is also good, as you can view in critters the tank and they work with a magnetic intank magnifier. 

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RemoGaggi

I was able to identify my dinos were ostreopsis with a 45-year old toy microscope I had as a kid.  I was about to order one and then remembered I used to have one at my late grandparent's house.  My uncle was able to find it for me - Woohoo!  But, BOO!! on the dinos!  

 

I had to use the 125x eyepiece to see the dino cells.  Here's picture of my microscope.  

 

IMG_20190929_075924502.thumb.jpg.64496a1dc6a17fc61e529f1e906d045b.jpg

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mcarroll

Too cool!!

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mcarroll
On 9/25/2019 at 2:36 PM, seabass said:

I didn't like the idea of using immersion oil for 100x objectives used on many more expensive scopes.  Although some scopes in this price range have nice features

Apparently there are dry 100x lenses too cuz I guess not everything is oil compatible...or maybe just cuz  some of us don't want to futz with oil.

 

I'm glad my basic Tasco LM400 400x scope is enough to do the job! 😎👍

 

@Clown79 just noticed that Google finds a ton of used listings for this scope:

https://www.google.com/search?q=tasco+lm400+microscope

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TerribleLobster

Get a cheap microscope on Craigslist! You only need 40x-100x to observe everything you want to see in a reef tank.

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Txplicit

If you guys are looking for a way to zoom up a specimen to identify (i.e. algae, nuisance pests, etc), I'd suggest not looking into a microscope and more into a magnifier.  They sell digital magnifiers that attach to your laptop/computer.  The one I have at work zooms 8x magnification.  More than enough to ID. 

 

A microscope usually has dark field lighting that makes it easier to see through the specimen.  Yes it has light field too, but the field of vision in microscope is much harder to focus upon.  Lastly, microscopes (due to the extra proper lighting) generally costs more. 

 

How do I know?  I am a graduate gemologist and diamontaire.  I use microscopes and stereo scopes almost daily.  I also use digital magnifiers to take enhanced photos of gemstones.

 

Hope it helps save you money and be more effective.

Screenshot_20190930-020154_Amazon Shopping.jpg

 

I doubt this magnifies 250x, and it is by no means a microscope.  I don't want to get technical.  However, anything over 8x magnification that doesn't blur in field of visions should suffice.

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mcarroll
On 9/30/2019 at 1:17 AM, TerribleLobster said:

You only need 40x-100x

Just FYI to readers, that's the power of the objective lenses, not counting the power of the eyepiece, which is commonly 10x.

 

So if you were shopping for a scope and you saw one with 40x-100x objectives it would likely be sold as "400x-1000x microscope" or just "with 1000x magnification".  You typically wouldn't see the objective magnification in the marketing.

 

For example:

Home 1000X LED Microscope

Home 1000X LED Microscope

"Optics include a widefield 10x eyepiece on a 360° rotating head with 4, 10, 40x and 100x (oil) achromatic DIN parfocalled and parcentered objectives that provide magnification of 40, 100, 400 and 1000x."

 

Image result for parts of a compound microscope

 

On 9/30/2019 at 3:00 AM, Txplicit said:

I doubt this magnifies 250x, and it is by no means a microscope.  I don't want to get technical.  However, anything over 8x magnification that doesn't blur in field of visions should suffice.

It probably does, but you probably have to be really really close to the object.  I think this is often called an examination scope and is used (among other things) for circuit board examination.

 

I think it should be a pretty good option for lots of things even if it's not quite enough for the smallest critters.  I think I have seen folks ID dino's on one before, but can't recall for certain.....too many posts to remember em all!!!  ;-D

 

It's functionally more comparable to a dissecting scope something like this, but a dissecting scope is 3D where an exam. scope is 2D:

20x i-Explore Stereo Microscope

20x i-Explore Stereo Microscope

 

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TerribleLobster

Just to clarify, the most total magnification (eyepiece + objective) you need to identify algaes and fish diseases would be 40x-100x. 

 

So if you have a 10x eyepiece and a 4x objective (4*10 = 40) you would be fine for reefing applications. The above post is right to call out that magnification is a product of the eyepiece and the objective lens.

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mcarroll

I know my 400x scope is fine for dino's....it gets 40x, 100x and 400x magnification (on a 10x eyepiece).  Never had dino's so not sure how they appear under the smaller magnifications...but 400x is definitely more than adequate, it's more than minimal.  👍

Edited by mcarroll
clarity

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