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Redreidy

Hello, I'm new, and need some wise advice.

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Ratvan

I QT for a minimum of 6 weeks, I will treat each fish for internal parasites while they are in the QT. If I spot anything else while they are in QT I will also treat them for that at the same time.

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Clown79
1 hour ago, Redreidy said:

Okay so I have ordered a small tank, heater and filter to set up a quarantine take. I have been doing some reading of quarantine guides and in essence people are advising quarantine periods of between 2-4 months. They are also advising multiple medication dosing, freshwater dips etc. 

 

Are these people being overly cautious or is this the right way to do it? I'm all for taking it slow but I started this tank at the end of March and at this rate I wont add a fish until the new year!

 

What are the must do's of a marine QT?

Personal choice to prophylactically treat or just observe.

 

I prefer to qt for 4 weeks, observation only and if the fish needs treating, then I treat it.

 

Most qt for 4 weeks and more if the fish need treatment.

 

I think 2-4mnths is excessive unless they are being treated for something.

 

I qt nothing else but fish.

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mcarroll

I'd add that how/if you proceed with QT also depends on the source of the fish and your expertise at recognizing sick and healthy fish.

 

18 hours ago, Redreidy said:

Okay so I have ordered a small tank, heater and filter to set up a quarantine take.

I would caution against the bare, stereotypical quarantine tank:  small tank, heater, filter + PVC chunk. 

image.png.bb4e84fad0778c2494be19e584038b75.png

image.png.6115663ce0b67e102a06b011f41ff345.png

This kind of setup ought to be called a "hospital tank" or "treatment tank" because it's fine for something short-term (a week or less in most cases) like that. 

 

Quarantine may or may not include treatments with medication, but it will include the fish being there for at least a month in most cases (if you're going to the trouble of QTing).  

 

A month is assuming nothing goes wrong.  If something happens in QT, that means at least another month under best-case scenarios -- maybe months.

 

That all adds up to a lot of stress if all that time ends up being in a prison cell-like quarantine like the ones pictured above. 

 

For a long stretch of time like 1+ months you want it to be LOW STRESS.

 

The situation is made worse if the tank is too small....5-10 gallons is too small to be ideal for most cases. 

 

A better quarantine setup is designed for de-stressing and recovery of the fish's own immune system.

 

Considering stress and all factors, for most cases 20-30 gallons should be considered "small" but adequate for quarantine, while 40 gallons and up would be ideal. 

 

This is very dependent on the specific fish being quarantined.  Most marine fish are on the large side compared to most freshwater fish.  So a 10 gallon QT would be fine in freshwater for most cases, but very borderline/tiny for saltwater where the probability of larger, very-sensitive fish is high.

 

A better QT doesn't have to be outfitted with anything fancy.  Just some naturalistic elements like a piece of live rock and a few plastic plants will make all the difference.

 

Better-QT examples:

image.png.36df256e008c6aeab730d35cc75f0f43.png

image.png.3bae897367ffd781e9e20686bfb0de1b.png

image.png.8dd4cff74bf78f9cdcb0261c965ea75e.png

 

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Snow_Phoenix
23 minutes ago, mcarroll said:

I'd add that how/if you proceed with QT also depends on the source of the fish and your expertise at recognizing sick and healthy fish.

 

I would caution against the bare, stereotypical quarantine tank:  small tank, heater, filter + PVC chunk. 

image.png.bb4e84fad0778c2494be19e584038b75.png

image.png.6115663ce0b67e102a06b011f41ff345.png

This kind of setup ought to be called a "hospital tank" or "treatment tank" because it's fine for something short-term (a week or less in most cases) like that. 

 

Quarantine may or may not include treatments with medication, but it will include the fish being there for at least a month in most cases (if you're going to the trouble of QTing).  

 

A month is assuming nothing goes wrong.  If something happens in QT, that means at least another month under best-case scenarios -- maybe months.

 

That all adds up to a lot of stress if all that time ends up being in a prison cell-like quarantine like the ones pictured above. 

 

For a long stretch of time like 1+ months you want it to be LOW STRESS.

 

The situation is made worse if the tank is too small....5-10 gallons is too small to be ideal for most cases. 

 

A better quarantine setup is designed for de-stressing and recovery of the fish's own immune system.

 

Considering stress and all factors, for most cases 20-30 gallons should be considered "small" but adequate for quarantine, while 40 gallons and up would be ideal. 

 

This is very dependent on the specific fish being quarantined.  Most marine fish are on the large side compared to most freshwater fish.  So a 10 gallon QT would be fine in freshwater for most cases, but very borderline/tiny for saltwater where the probability of larger, very-sensitive fish is high.

 

A better QT doesn't have to be outfitted with anything fancy.  Just some naturalistic elements like a piece of live rock and a few plastic plants will make all the difference.

 

Better-QT examples:

image.png.36df256e008c6aeab730d35cc75f0f43.png

image.png.3bae897367ffd781e9e20686bfb0de1b.png

image.png.8dd4cff74bf78f9cdcb0261c965ea75e.png

 

Hi - sorry for threadjacking. But do the plastic plants add any proper benefit to a QT? Am wondering if I should add some to mine. 

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mcarroll

Yes in terms of lowering fish stress levels.  😊   More hiding places.  More natural movements in the tank.  Less unobstructed solid, flat surfaces.  Etc.

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mcarroll

I should have said "naturalistic" rather than "natural" there...

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Snow_Phoenix
1 hour ago, mcarroll said:

Yes in terms of lowering fish stress levels.  😊   More hiding places.  More natural movements in the tank.  Less unobstructed solid, flat surfaces.  Etc.

Noted with thanks! 

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Redreidy

Hi thank you for the ad

8 hours ago, mcarroll said:

I'd add that how/if you proceed with QT also depends on the source of the fish and your expertise at recognizing sick and healthy fish.

 

I would caution against the bare, stereotypical quarantine tank:  small tank, heater, filter + PVC chunk. 

image.png.bb4e84fad0778c2494be19e584038b75.png

image.png.6115663ce0b67e102a06b011f41ff345.png

This kind of setup ought to be called a "hospital tank" or "treatment tank" because it's fine for something short-term (a week or less in most cases) like that. 

 

Quarantine may or may not include treatments with medication, but it will include the fish being there for at least a month in most cases (if you're going to the trouble of QTing).  

 

A month is assuming nothing goes wrong.  If something happens in QT, that means at least another month under best-case scenarios -- maybe months.

 

That all adds up to a lot of stress if all that time ends up being in a prison cell-like quarantine like the ones pictured above. 

 

For a long stretch of time like 1+ months you want it to be LOW STRESS.

 

The situation is made worse if the tank is too small....5-10 gallons is too small to be ideal for most cases. 

 

A better quarantine setup is designed for de-stressing and recovery of the fish's own immune system.

 

Considering stress and all factors, for most cases 20-30 gallons should be considered "small" but adequate for quarantine, while 40 gallons and up would be ideal. 

 

This is very dependent on the specific fish being quarantined.  Most marine fish are on the large side compared to most freshwater fish.  So a 10 gallon QT would be fine in freshwater for most cases, but very borderline/tiny for saltwater where the probability of larger, very-sensitive fish is high.

 

A better QT doesn't have to be outfitted with anything fancy.  Just some naturalistic elements like a piece of live rock and a few plastic plants will make all the difference.

 

Better-QT examples:

image.png.36df256e008c6aeab730d35cc75f0f43.png

image.png.3bae897367ffd781e9e20686bfb0de1b.png

image.png.8dd4cff74bf78f9cdcb0261c965ea75e.png

 

Hi thank you for the advice. The tank I have purchased for QT is only 7g but to be honest my main tank is only 15g. The fish I will be getting will be very small (juvenile clown, clown goby and royal gamma) so hopefully my tanks will suffice. The longer term plan is to invest in a much larger display tank around 100g but that will be in a year or so.

 

In will take your advice regarding making the QT more of a natural environment however.

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mcarroll
11 hours ago, Redreidy said:

The tank I have purchased for QT is only 7g but to be honest my main tank is only 15g. The fish I will be getting will be very small (juvenile clown, clown goby and royal gamma) so hopefully my tanks will suffice.

 

For best results I'd try your best to do no more than 1 fish at a time in that case.

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Redreidy
On 8/11/2019 at 6:35 AM, mcarroll said:

 

For best results I'd try your best to do no more than 1 fish at a time in that case.

Oh yes that’s the plan. 

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