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chathurai

Anyone run tank around 86f

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chathurai

Im from srilanka , My tank temp fluctuate around 84- 86, i have mostly zoas and favia those are collected  from the shallow reefs around the country ,

is 86 too much ? my tank is 24*24*12 shallow cube . chillers are very expensive to buy and run, i tried fans bit it just drop temp around 1-2 max with lots of evaporation.

do you tink adding chiller will make huge impact to the tank ? or 86 is fine 

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Tamberav

Years ago would get around 85 without issue. Was just softies and clownfish/goby/cleaner shrimp.

 

This only happened in summer though.

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chathurai

Here forever summer 😄 

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jservedio

I think as long as you are carefully choosing your coral, I don't see why it wouldn't work. At night time, does the temperature get a little lower?

 

As long as you are keeping stuff that normally lives in shallow lagoons or tidal pools, it should be totally fine. If your tank gets a little cooler at night time, you might be fine with even more corals.

 

You could also cool the whole house a few degrees more or just cool the room with your tank more if you wanted to keep more coral.

 

Edit: What lights are you running and what pumps are you running? Pumps dump a TON of heat into your water - if you were able to get more efficient pumps (like an MP10 to keep the heat outside the tank) and have LEDs and keep them 12"+ off the surface - that could help a lot too.

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seabass

It will likely be alright unless there is a power outage.  Me, I'd probably take the couple of degrees offered by the fan (even with the additional evaporation).

 

The largest variety of corals are found in waters averaging 83-86°F:

http://web.archive.org/web/20030218193420/www.animalnetwork.com/fish2/aqfm/1997/nov/features/1/default.asp

 

Quote

Reef aquaria do, however, have limitations that may make their optimal temperature somewhat lower. During normal functioning of a reef aquarium, the oxygen level and the metabolic rate of the aquarium inhabitants are not often important issues. During a crisis such as a power failure, however, the dissolved oxygen can be rapidly used up. Lower temperatures not only allow a higher oxygen level before an emergency, but will also slow the consumption of that oxygen by slowing the metabolism of the aquarium's inhabitants. The production of ammonia as organisms begin to die may also be slower at lower temperatures. For reasons such as this, one may choose to strike a practical balance between temperatures that are too high (even if corals normally thrive in the ocean at those temperatures), and those that are too low. Although average reef temperatures in maximal diversity areas (i.e. coral triangle centered Indonesia,) these areas are also often subject to significant mixing. In fact, the cooler reefs, ( i..e. open Pacific reefs) are often more stable at lower temperatures due to oceanic exchange but are less tolerant to bleaching and other temperature related perturbations.

 

All things considered, those natural guidelines leave a fairly wide range of acceptable temperatures. I keep my aquarium at about 80-81° F year-round. I am actually more inclined to keep the aquarium cooler in the summer, when a power failure would most likely warm the aquarium, and higher in winter, when a power failure would most likely cool it.

 

All things considered, I recommend temperatures in the range of 76-83° F unless there is a very clear reason to keep it outside that range.

- Randy Holmes-Farley

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Clown79

I think if the temp is consistently those temps you have less of an issue.

 

It's more concerning when you jump from 78 to 86.

 

I think using a fan is a good option for cooling

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chathurai
On 4/11/2019 at 6:53 PM, jservedio said:

I think as long as you are carefully choosing your coral, I don't see why it wouldn't work. At night time, does the temperature get a little lower?

 

As long as you are keeping stuff that normally lives in shallow lagoons or tidal pools, it should be totally fine. If your tank gets a little cooler at night time, you might be fine with even more corals.

 

You could also cool the whole house a few degrees more or just cool the room with your tank more if you wanted to keep more coral.

 

Edit: What lights are you running and what pumps are you running? Pumps dump a TON of heat into your water - if you were able to get more efficient pumps (like an MP10 to keep the heat outside the tank) and have LEDs and keep them 12"+ off the surface - that could help a lot too.

Thanks for the great advice , i have one AC pump (3000LPH ) for return and one jebao cp25 crossflow , those are the only heat source for my reef tank , lights i have kessil a150 mounted 1ft height ,

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chathurai
On 4/11/2019 at 11:37 PM, seabass said:

It will likely be alright unless there is a power outage.  Me, I'd probably take the couple of degrees offered by the fan (even with the additional evaporation).

 

The largest variety of corals are found in waters averaging 83-86°F:

http://web.archive.org/web/20030218193420/www.animalnetwork.com/fish2/aqfm/1997/nov/features/1/default.asp

 

- Randy Holmes-Farley

 My previous nano tank i have used fans to drop temperature, ill try fans this time too. i have notice no growth of the xenia and zoas maybe not because of the temprature i have 0.5 po4 😞 

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