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Just say no to Anemones


earwicker7

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Well, since I previously posted as to the success that I have had with keeping an anemone in my nanoreef, I thought I should mention that I have been converted to the "They are not reef-safe" camp. When I arrived at work today, my anemone had TRIPLED in size, and it was already one of the largest rosetips I've seen. It was almost as wide as the 12g nanocube it's in and was touching, and therefor stinging, half of the inhabitants of the tank. I thought that I hadn't had any problems with it before in the months that I've had it, but in the four or five hours since I pried it off the rock (which took about 20 minutes with no tears in the anemone but many booboos on my hand thanks to a rather aggressive emerald crab) I've noticed that the christmas tree worms that were next to it are always out--before, I thought that they were just skittish and popped in and out all the time, but now, they almost never disappear. I still plan on getting another anemone at a future date in a species specific tank, but I HIGHLY recommend to those of you who think like I used to that eventually, you will regret keeping an anemone in your reef tank. One exception--there is a sand anemone that is considered reef safe because it's sting is extremely mild; I can't remember it's scientific name but I have it at home and will try to remember to post it. Oh, by the way, the anemone is fine; I traded it in for store credit, although the porcelain crab that lived in it only has one arm and therefor can't be sold and is now probably in the stomach of the LFS's shark.

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anenomes are fine so longs as you know what you are getting in to. lol ;) i've gotten rid of a few anenomes becuase they outgrew my tank. :happy: :happy: :happy:

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Actually, to me at least, the issue wasn't the size--I could have easily kept the anemone in the tank, it just would have killed all my corals. My point was that I had no problems with mine for months, and I arrogantly ignored all of the people that told me that I would eventually encounter problems, although everyone said that it would be because of the anemone moving, not growing. What I'm getting at is not that you can't keep an anemone in a small tank, just that you are endangering any corals that happen to be with it, and should therefor consider them as something that is not reef-safe; all of the experts agree on this, I was just too stupid to listen. Play it safe and keep them in a species-specific tank.

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Originally posted by earwicker7

Actually, to me at least, the issue wasn't the size--I could have easily kept the anemone in the tank, it just would have killed all my corals.  My point was that I had no problems with mine for months, and I arrogantly ignored all of the people that told me that I would eventually encounter problems, although everyone said that it would be because of the anemone moving, not growing.  What I'm getting at is not that you can't keep an anemone in a small tank, just that you are endangering any corals that happen to be with it, and should therefor consider them as something that is not reef-safe; all of the experts agree on this, I was just too stupid to listen.  Play it safe and keep them in a species-specific tank.

 

Mine never moves. Only if it becomes stressed does it move.

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Neither did mine for months--I swear it didn't even move a centimeter. Everyone told me it would and I didn't listen. Then I get to work, it's moved only two inches but that put it within reach of all of the corals since it had also expanded at the same time. You mentioned getting a bigger tank--take my advice and use one for the anemone and the other as a reef tank. Luckily, I caught the situation in time, but if I had been on vacation for a week, I'm sure that the corals in my tank would now be dead.

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Originally posted by earwicker7

Neither did mine for months--I swear it didn't even move a centimeter.  Everyone told me it would and I didn't listen.  Then I get to work, it's moved only two inches but that put it within reach of all of the corals since it had also expanded at the same time.  You mentioned getting a bigger tank--take my advice and use one for the anemone and the other as a reef tank.  Luckily, I caught the situation in time, but if I had been on vacation for a week, I'm sure that the corals in my tank would now be dead.

 

There seems to be many.. many.. many other people who have been able to keep their anenomes with corals. Maybe your anenome has too strong of a sting, or you just had a bad experience. Considering the low amount of corals I have in my tank the anenome is staying where he is and when I get a bigger tank (if he lives till then) he is coming in the big one too.

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Originally posted by earwicker7

Actually, to me at least, the issue wasn't the size--I could have easily kept the anemone in the tank, it just would have killed all my corals.  My point was that I had no problems with mine for months, and I arrogantly ignored all of the people that told me that I would eventually encounter problems, although everyone said that it would be because of the anemone moving, not growing.  What I'm getting at is not that you can't keep an anemone in a small tank, just that you are endangering any corals that happen to be with it, and should therefor consider them as something that is not reef-safe; all of the experts agree on this, I was just too stupid to listen.  Play it safe and keep them in a species-specific tank.

If anything is left alone to grow for long enough, you will run into problems with Any animals. That is where husbandry comes in.

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Originally posted by birdman204

If anything is left alone to grow for long enough, you will run into problems with Any animals.  That is where husbandry comes in.

Dang. I was hoping the clowns would be OK in the 90 for a while.
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Originally posted by earwicker7

You should check out my earlier post when I was on your side--it sounds almost exactly the same.

 

No.. it is rather clear that your anenome was unhappy with the watter conditions hence the moving about. Anenomes are not easy things to keep but if done right they can be reef safe.

 

Go read around on reefcentral there is lots of info about it.. here is an anenome faq that is on one of the stickied threads which states that "If anenomes are unhappy with their local enviroment, they will move to find one more sutiable. An indication of an unhappy enviroment is one in which anenomes continue to move about the tank-if happy, an anenome will settle down and remain in one place for a long period of time (years)."

 

http://www.carlosreef.com/AnemoneFAQ.pdf

http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.p...threadid=282136

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My rose has moved twice, and has stayed put for the past 6 mos. it is about half dollar sized, and recently split. The new clone is now looking for a new place to call home after healing.

An inflated anemone on the glass(not natural) going up is looking for more oxygen or more light.

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Originally posted by cybaix

No.. it is rather clear that your anenome was unhappy with the watter conditions hence the moving about. Anenomes are not easy things to keep but if done right they can be reef safe.

 

Go read around on reefcentral there is lots of info about it.. here is an anenome faq that is on one of the stickied threads which states that "If anenomes are unhappy with their local enviroment, they will move to find one more sutiable. An indication of an unhappy enviroment is one in which anenomes continue to move about the tank-if happy, an anenome will settle down and remain in one place for a long period of time (years)."

 

http://www.carlosreef.com/AnemoneFAQ.pdf

http://reefcentral.com/forums/showthread.p...threadid=282136

 

Ok, now you're out of line. My water conditions are FINE--my LFS says that I'm the most anal person he's ever known when it comes to this. If you'd actually read the post that you quoted, you'd notice that it says "continue to move about." This is an anemone that stayed in place for MONTHS and moved a whole two inches ONCE. Go ahead and keep your anemone--I'll laugh my ass off when you end up finding out that you are just as bullheaded as I once was. I'll stick to information from PUBLISHED AUTHORS instead of someone's website; they all agree with me, and I wish I'd listened to them.

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Originally posted by birdman204

My rose has moved twice, and has stayed put for the past 6 mos. it is about half dollar sized, and recently split.  The new clone is now looking for a new place to call home after healing.

An inflated anemone on the glass(not natural) going up is looking for more oxygen or more light.

 

The anemone wasn't on the glass; it was still attached to the rock. As to the size of bubbletips, deep water specimens stay small, shallow water specimens, which tend to stay in the upper part of the tank, are large (up to 17"). The larger ones tend to spread their tentacles in order to help the photosynthesis--it's their way of feeding (other than the typical route, which I fed it once a week).

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Originally posted by earwicker7

Ok, now you're out of line.  My water conditions are FINE--my LFS says that I'm the most anal person he's ever known when it comes to this.  If you'd actually read the post that you quoted, you'd notice that it says "continue to move about."  This is an anemone that stayed in place for MONTHS and moved a whole two inches ONCE.  Go ahead and keep your anemone--I'll laugh my ass off when you end up finding out that you are just as bullheaded as I once was.  I'll stick to information from PUBLISHED AUTHORS instead of someone's website; they all agree with me, and I wish I'd listened to them.

 

Ok.. seeing as how you want to be an ass about it. Present said evidence from these "experts".

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