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Abhijit

New Nano Reef

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Abhijit
3 hours ago, seabass said:

It's true that a diatom bloom usually occurs around this time (especially when using new sand).  However, it doesn't always happen.  Lack of silicate can prevent a diatom bloom.  Also, the reduction light cycle can be delaying the bloom.  And yes, green algae blooms often follow diatoms (depending on nutrient levels).  I usually don't like adding coral until after these blooms.

 

@Abhijit, I would increase your light cycle (to normal times) during this week.  We might as well see if anything blooms.  This might also provide some food for a cleanup crew (when you are ready to add them).

@seabass, sure! I'll increase my light cycle starting today. Let's see if I get any bloom in about a week's time

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Abhijit

@seabass, did a 90% WC today. Now I'll wait for a week and see what my levels are at. Will report back in a week.

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seabass

I'm curious, what's the ammonia level now?  Also, someday you might wish to test a newly mixed batch of saltwater.  It's surprising, how much ammonia can sometimes be in a fresh batch of saltwater.  Our biofilters can usually dispatch of this added ammonia fairly quickly, so it usually isn't much of an issue.

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Abhijit
5 hours ago, seabass said:

I'm curious, what's the ammonia level now?  Also, someday you might wish to test a newly mixed batch of saltwater.  It's surprising, how much ammonia can sometimes be in a fresh batch of saltwater.  Our biofilters can usually dispatch of this added ammonia fairly quickly, so it usually isn't much of an issue.

@seabass, interesting question. I actually didn't test after I did the WC today. I'll do that tomorrow morning and let you know. 

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Abhijit

@seabass @Naekuh - Here are my day # 23 parameters. Ammonia is almost 0, Nitrites are a definite 0, Nitrates are at 10-15ppm. Last WC (90%) was done 6 days back.

 

Looks like my tank is fully cycled? 

 

Thoughts? 

 

00000IMG_00000_BURST20190311092655053_COVER.jpg

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seabass

Yeah, I'd say it looks pretty good.  I'd still change out at least half of the water (one more time) to cut nitrate in half.  Usually, nano reefs don't support enough denitrifying bacteria to reduce it; so water changes, macro algae, or some other export mechanism are required to bring nitrate down.

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Abhijit
32 minutes ago, seabass said:

Yeah, I'd say it looks pretty good.  I'd still change out at least half of the water (one more time) to cut nitrate in half.  Usually, nano reefs don't support enough denitrifying bacteria to reduce it; so water changes, macro algae, or some other export mechanism are required to bring nitrate down.

@seabass Sure, I'll do a 50% WC tomorrow. When can I add livestock? I was originally going to add turbo snails and peppermint shrimp, but since I don't have any algae, I'm thinking of adding either a Percula or a Watchman Goby.

 

What do you think? 

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seabass
On 1/23/2019 at 10:50 PM, Abhijit said:

Hi, 

 

Firstly, my apologies, for this is going to be a  long post. I have a lot of questions. I do appreciate all and any inputs you guys can provide.

 

I am planning to convert my freshwater nano ADA cube to a Nano reef. This will be my first experience with anything marine. I have been keeping freshwater fish and planted tanks for a few years and now want to take a leap to marine. I am from India, so I will not have a lot to choose from, live rock, live sand, and most of the corals being illegal here. I also do not have a range of marine equipment that I can choose from. It is either too expensive compared to US prices (marine fishkeeping has still not picked up pace in India), or it's just not available. 

 

I plan on using the following equipment - 

 

(1) ADA 12X12X12 inches cube (roughly 7.5 gallons) 

(2) Ehiem Liberty 130 HOB filter

(3) Boyu WG-310 HOB Protein Skimmer

(4) 30W lights that I use for my planted tank. I will later buy Hipargero 30w LED Reef Lighting once I add corals in a few months

(5) 15lbs normal rock, which I assume will not be marine specific. It will mostly be something that people use for freshwater cichlids tanks. 

(6) 10lbs normal sand. LFS here call it sugar sand, if that helps. 

(7) Aquaforest Coral Reef Salt. 

(8) Hydrometer 

(9) API saltwater test kit

(10) API reef test kit. This will be atleast a month or so before I add my first coral. 

 

Corals/Anemones that I can get my hands on - 

 

(1) Aussie Rock Flower Anemones

(2) Aussie Maxi-Mini Carpet Anemones

(3) Aussie Anchor Corals

(4) Red Rhodactic Mushroom

(5) Aussie Open Brain Corals

(6) Aussie Acan Lord

(7) Tridacna Clam Corals

(8) Japanese Super Sun Corals

 

Fish I plan to stock - 

 

(1) 2 Clowns

(2) 1 Goby

(3) 1 Bangai Cardinal

(4) 2 shrimps

(5) 3 snails

 

 

Now, I have done a fair amount of research and here's what I plan on doing -

 

(1) Add rocks, sand, water etc and cycle the tank for 45 days

(2) Add shrimps on day # 45

(3) Add clowns on day # 90

(4) Add goby on day # 105

(5) Add first anemone on day # 120

(6) Add second anemone on day # 135

(7) Add first coral on day # 150

(8) Add second coral on day # 180

And then basically go on adding corals about 1 coral a month.

 

Is the above all good? Do I need to change anything? Apart of the equipment I mentioned, will I need anything else? Will I need any additives for the corals or any other test kits? 

 

Again, my apologies for such a long post. I will be thankful if you guys can provide any inputs. 

 

Thanks,

AG

Sorry, I haven't read through this thread yet.  So is this a 7.5 gal cube?  If so, don't plan on a pair of clownfish, but one should be alright.  I definitely wouldn't add a Banggai cardinal, but a goby should be OK.  Check out this guide for a suitable goby:

 

Two fish and a pair of shrimp will have this little cube pretty fully stocked.  I recommend keeping blood red fire shrimp instead of peppermint shrimp.  They are more attractive, but primarily because they don't tend to pick at coral, fan worms, and anemones as aggressively.

 

I might actually add the goby first, as clownfish can be more aggressive.

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Abhijit
4 hours ago, seabass said:

Sorry, I haven't read through this thread yet.  So is this a 7.5 gal cube?  If so, don't plan on a pair of clownfish, but one should be alright.  I definitely wouldn't add a Banggai cardinal, but a goby should be OK.  Check out this guide for a suitable goby:

 

Two fish and a pair of shrimp will have this little cube pretty fully stocked.  I recommend keeping blood red fire shrimp instead of peppermint shrimp.  They are more attractive, but primarily because they don't tend to pick at coral, fan worms, and anemones as aggressively.

 

I might actually add the goby first, as clownfish can be more aggressive.

@seabass I'll definitely go through the guide you sent. I plan to have just 1 Percula and 1 Watchman Goby with a shrimp pair. I actually wanted cleaner Shrimps, but I'm not getting any anywhere. I'll keep looking. 

 

Should I go ahead and add the watchman goby day after, considering I'll do a 50% WC tomorrow? 

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seabass
33 minutes ago, Abhijit said:

Should I go ahead and add the watchman goby day after, considering I'll do a 50% WC tomorrow? 

With the guide (look about halfway down on the first page for minimum tank size recommendations), I was trying to steer you to another goby.  There are a number of small gobies that are well suited for a 7 gallon tank.  A watchman is listed at 10 gallons.  I know, not a huge difference, so it might be fine, I would consider another goby if possible.

 

Before adding anything after your water change, check ammonia a day afterwards, just to be sure.

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Abhijit
12 minutes ago, seabass said:

With the guide (look about halfway down on the first page for minimum tank size recommendations), I was trying to steer you to another goby.  There are a number of small gobies that are well suited for a 7 gallon tank.  A watchman is listed at 10 gallons.  I know, not a huge difference, so it might be fine, I would consider another goby if possible.

 

Before adding anything after your water change, check ammonia a day afterwards, just to be sure.

@seabass Sure thing. I'll go through the guide. Originally I wanted a purple firefish goby, but it looks like they're hard to source here in India. My LFS has a watchman goby and a false Percula in stock right now. Plus I researched some on the watchman goby, and I love what I read. Such incredible little creatures. 

 

I would really love to have 1 false Percula and 1 Watchman Goby. You think I'll be okay? 

 

The LFS also has a tube worms anemone in stock. I was aiming for a bubbletip, since I don't know much about tube worms, but what are your thoughts on tube worm anemones?

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seabass
18 minutes ago, Abhijit said:

I would really love to have 1 false Percula and 1 Watchman Goby. You think I'll be okay?

I believe that it's pushing the limits on both; but yeah, I'd guess that it could be alright.

 

20 minutes ago, Abhijit said:

The LFS also has a tube worms anemone in stock. I was aiming for a bubbletip, since I don't know much about tube worms, but what are your thoughts on tube worm anemones?

I'd pass.  They want a deeper sand bed.  Also, I believe they are non-photosynthetic, so you would have to feed it more.  Plus, it wouldn't host your clownfish.

 

With a BTA, realize that they can potentially grow to the point of filling a tank as small as yours.  I'd probably just stick with a rock flower anemone, or a maxi-mini (although these are not host anemones either).  Your clownfish might "host" a hammer coral.  You might want to just stick with coral.

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Abhijit
16 hours ago, seabass said:

I believe that it's pushing the limits on both; but yeah, I'd guess that it could be alright.

 

I'd pass.  They want a deeper sand bed.  Also, I believe they are non-photosynthetic, so you would have to feed it more.  Plus, it wouldn't host your clownfish.

 

With a BTA, realize that they can potentially grow to the point of filling a tank as small as yours.  I'd probably just stick with a rock flower anemone, or a maxi-mini (although these are not host anemones either).  Your clownfish might "host" a hammer coral.  You might want to just stick with coral.

@seabass That's a good idea. I'll pass on the anemones in general, considering my tank is very small, and go for a hammer coral instead. 

 

Will add the goby sometime this week. Will post pictures 😊

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Abhijit
1 hour ago, Abhijit said:

@seabass That's a good idea. I'll pass on the anemones in general, considering my tank is very small, and go for a hammer coral instead. 

 

Will add the goby sometime this week. Will post pictures 😊

@seabass @Naekuh - I just looked carefully and it looks like I do have some algae growing. Pics attached. 

 

Should I add snails and shrimp first? And then wait for a few days to add the fish?

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seabass
17 minutes ago, Abhijit said:

Should I add snails and shrimp first? And then wait for a few days to add the fish?

You could add snails and a fish if you really wanted.  Snails shouldn't add a whole lot to the bio-load.  I would hold off a couple more weeks to add shrimp.  Shrimp tend to be more sensitive.  Also realize that besides eating left over food, shrimp serve little other cleanup crew functions.  And with their food intake, they add about as much to the bio-load as a fish.

 

You mentioned a cleaner shrimp.  A skunk cleaner shrimp is generally fairly well mannered, as far as shrimp go.  Some people refuse to keep shrimp in general, because they all will steal food.  Myself, I like watching them, but am currently am not keeping any.  I keep a hermit crab or two around instead.  But if you've never kept a shrimp before, it's an experience you might wish to try.

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Abhijit
1 hour ago, seabass said:

You could add snails and a fish if you really wanted.  Snails shouldn't add a whole lot to the bio-load.  I would hold off a couple more weeks to add shrimp.  Shrimp tend to be more sensitive.  Also realize that besides eating left over food, shrimp serve little other cleanup crew functions.  And with their food intake, they add about as much to the bio-load as a fish.

 

You mentioned a cleaner shrimp.  A skunk cleaner shrimp is generally fairly well mannered, as far as shrimp go.  Some people refuse to keep shrimp in general, because they all will steal food.  Myself, I like watching them, but am currently am not keeping any.  I keep a hermit crab or two around instead.  But if you've never kept a shrimp before, it's an experience you might wish to try.

I'm definitely going to get a shrimp. And I'll wait a few weeks before I add shrimp. Thanks! 

 

I'll add 2 turbo snails and 1 Watchman goby sometime this week. 

 

Thanks a ton @seabass

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Abhijit
On 3/12/2019 at 2:19 PM, Abhijit said:

I'm definitely going to get a shrimp. And I'll wait a few weeks before I add shrimp. Thanks! 

 

I'll add 2 turbo snails and 1 Watchman goby sometime this week. 

 

Thanks a ton @seabass

@seabass - why do I have two kinds of algae? One is green in colour, the other one is brown-ish. Is this normal?

00100dPORTRAIT_00100_BURST20190313144514132_COVER.jpg

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seabass

Looks pretty normal to me.  Algae consumes phosphate and nitrate (and light), as does most coral.  If nutrient levels, light spectrum, and/or light cycle duration favor algae growth, it will grow quickly.  The key is to provide more favorable conditions for coral than for algae (although the two overlap quite a bit).

 

A cleanup crew of herbivores will be necessary to help keep algae in check.  Also, phosphate levels shouldn't exceed 0.03 ppm while your tank is establishing itself.  Note that coral also utilize phosphate, so it's usually not good to have undetectable levels of phosphate.

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Abhijit
25 minutes ago, seabass said:

Looks pretty normal to me.  Algae consumes phosphate and nitrate (and light), as does most coral.  If nutrient levels, light spectrum, and/or light cycle duration favor algae growth, it will grow quickly.  The key is to provide more favorable conditions for coral than for algae (although the two overlap quite a bit).

 

A cleanup crew of herbivores will be necessary to help keep algae in check.  Also, phosphate levels shouldn't exceed 0.03 ppm while your tank is establishing itself.  Note that coral also utilize phosphate, so it's usually not good to have undetectable levels of phosphate.

@seabass I plan to get 2 turbo snails this week. Should be adequate cleanup crew?

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seabass

Hard to say for sure.  I personally like Astraea snails (not sure how available they are to you).  They are good cleaners, pretty hardy, and don't tend to knock stuff over.  Plus, they clean the glass and the rocks.  You might occasionally have to turn one upright, if it falls on its back (but that doesn't happen that often).  You might get three to start (if you're not paying for shipping), or four if you're ordering online.

 

I also kind of like to keep a dwarf blue leg hermit, or scarlet reef hermit for variety and entertainment.  However, you'd need to keep some suitably sized empty shells for it.

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Abhijit
30 minutes ago, seabass said:

Hard to say for sure.  I personally like Astraea snails (not sure how available they are to you).  They are good cleaners, pretty hardy, and don't tend to knock stuff over.  Plus, they clean the glass and the rocks.  You might occasionally have to turn one upright, if it falls on its back (but that doesn't happen that often).  You might get three to start (if you're not paying for shipping), or four if you're ordering online.

 

I also kind of like to keep a dwarf blue leg hermit, or scarlet reef hermit for variety and entertainment.  However, you'd need to keep some suitably sized empty shells for it.

@seabass ordering marine fish online is pretty much unheard of in India. There are a few online dealers, but a lot of them tend to send you substandard stuff. Freshwater fish are primary in India.. you can order online, zero shipping, etc.. Marine and reefkeeping is still in its early stages

 

I only have access to turbo snails at the moment. And I kind of preferred those because they can correct themselves if they fall on their back. 

 

The guy I'm buying stuff from doesn't have hermit crabs. He has small silver coloured starfish (not sure what those are called) and sea urchins, in addition to snails

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seabass

Then stick to the turbo snails.  Yeah, start with a couple and see how they do.  It should take a little time for them to clear the algae.  If they do it very quickly, then you have too many snails (and they'll end up starving).  If algae continues to increase, you need more snails, or you need to reduce your light cycle and/or nutrient levels.  Remember that whatever the snails eat end up as wastes in your tank; you'll have to remove the detritus during routine weekly maintenance.

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Abhijit
3 hours ago, seabass said:

Then stick to the turbo snails.  Yeah, start with a couple and see how they do.  It should take a little time for them to clear the algae.  If they do it very quickly, then you have too many snails (and they'll end up starving).  If algae continues to increase, you need more snails, or you need to reduce your light cycle and/or nutrient levels.  Remember that whatever the snails eat end up as wastes in your tank; you'll have to remove the detritus during routine weekly maintenance.

@seabass sure thing! I'll let you know how it goes. 

 

Thank you for all your advise, I truly value it! 

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Abhijit
On 3/13/2019 at 11:35 PM, Abhijit said:

@seabass sure thing! I'll let you know how it goes. 

 

Thank you for all your advise, I truly value it! 

@seabass Did a 30% WC today morning and checked my parameters after an hour. Going to my LFS to get the watchman goby and 2 turbo snails. Will post pictures soon after. Salinity at 1.025

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seabass

Can you wait a little longer?  I'm still seeing ammonia on your test results.  I'd like to see it closer to undetectable.  At the very least, make sure to have some Seachem Prime (or another ammonia detox product) on hand.  But really, I encourage you to wait a little longer.

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