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EthanPhillyCheesesteak

Can someone provide me with information on hammer coral?

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What do you want to know, help is almost guaranteed on the forum we just need to know the questions!  Most every question has already been answered too if you utilize the internet and search for it.

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Not much to say about them IMO. I've seen people mount them anywhere (height wise) with success. Low to moderate flow. I've had success with hammers in lower flow, medium light placements, just slightly swaying with the current. If you plan to frag it down the line, I'd try to get a branching kind, as opposed to a wall, although those can be fragged as well.

 

They're pretty tough, but my experience has been mixed. I have two, and one of them is a complete champ, round, puffy, all the heads are compact and together, but then I also have one who took on a lot of stress during my two-hour drive from the LFS and is just not recovering after about two weeks. Don't stress if it comes in and takes a couple of days to look good. 

 

Last point- nothing against LiveAquaria, I've never purchased anything from them, but I'd keep an eye out from coral vendors where you can see what you're getting before you buy. They usually label them as "WYSIWYG"

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My hammer likes medium light and random gentle flow. For whatever reason, IME and reading thru forums long ago, they grow faster mounted at a 45 degree angle—idk exactly why—maybe because they put energy to regrowing upwards perhaps—but that’s how I mount most my coral now anyway.

 

As long as your params are stable, they seem to be quite hardy. Mine was next to a frogspawn, touching even, but I moved him a little up. I don’t direct feed it, but I do broadcast zooplankton & oyster feast everyday. Pretty coral, look like large single headed flowers to me. 8B16534D-0ACE-4269-B604-BECAFFA176AA.thumb.jpeg.850a402c774a739b2376be281d69f055.jpeg

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I was mainly just wondering how hard they are to keep, but I think I got my answer. My water is great, never had a problem with my water yet except for the start of the tank obviously. I have a BTA, and if I have a BTA, I can probably have a hammer coral.

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20 minutes ago, EthanPhillyCheesesteak said:

I was mainly just wondering how hard they are to keep, but I think I got my answer. My water is great, never had a problem with my water yet except for the start of the tank obviously. I have a BTA, and if I have a BTA, I can probably have a hammer coral.

 

I would agree with that! There are branching hammer corals and walling hammer corals. Walling tend to be more difficult because disease can easily spread across the entire colony. Versus branching hammers have heads separated in space, and hence are more resilient to spread of disease. 

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20 minutes ago, HarryPotter said:

 

I would agree with that! There are branching hammer corals and walling hammer corals. Walling tend to be more difficult because disease can easily spread across the entire colony. Versus branching hammers have heads separated in space, and hence are more resilient to spread of disease. 

Thank you, I think I might just get one, they are really beautiful, and would look great in my tank

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Euphyllia corals can pack a punch.... watch out for long stinging tentacles.....(hammers, frogspawns and torches can usually be placed close together)... currently my hammer is at war with my trumpet coral

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I used to have a bubble coral 1 inch apart from a branching hammer, zero problems. Now I have a green wall hammer next to the bubble, and man, this thing is aggressive. Now both show long sweepers and attack each other, so I guess they are healthy

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If you're looking for more polyp extension but less coloration, go for less flow. If you're looking for more coloration but less polyp extension, go with more flow. 

From my experience with mainly torches, they look healthier long term with flow between medium and high. My powerhead pushes a lot of water at my torches, and they have never looked better. It does take time for them to get used to it though; I spent a couple months ramping up my flow to where they look perfect.

Tidal Gardens makes very informative videos on corals on youtube. Here's one on hammers I highly suggest you check out:

 

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