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jcrisman2009

Coral skeleton ID

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Ok guys and gals,

I bought this nice coral skeleton off ebay and as far as I know of its in the acropora family but i'd like to know exactly it's full scientific name. Any help would be Very much appreciated!

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I have very, very little experience with SPS. But if I had to guess, i'd say Green Slimer. 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, paulsz said:

I have very, very little experience with SPS. But if I had to guess, i'd say Green Slimer

 

 

I think you're right! Oh wow! It's so pretty! looks like its radioactive! Thank you paulsz!

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Yeah it is pretty cool! And from what i've heard, it's one of the easier acroporas to care for. Definitely something i will look into when i put SPS in my tank

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23 minutes ago, paulsz said:

Yeah it is pretty cool! And from what i've heard, it's one of the easier acroporas to care for. Definitely something i will look into when i put SPS in my tank

So it's Acropora Yongei. In nature it's Uniform cream, yellow or pale brown but in aquacultured it's green.....How do they make them be green??? Do they take two separate corals and cross them?? Like a hybrid?

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It could be any acro. They lose all color when they die. There are many many many different variations in species of acropora. If you don't have a microscope to look at the skeleton or don't analyze any DNA, you can't get a positive ID. You can't breed hybrid acros. Almost all coral breeding is impossible right now in aquariums. All their colors are what they were when they were in wild (though some will change color under different lighting).

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1 hour ago, Joevember said:

It could be any acro. They lose all color when they die. There are many many many different variations in species of acropora. If you don't have a microscope to look at the skeleton or don't analyze any DNA, you can't get a positive ID. You can't breed hybrid acros. Almost all coral breeding is impossible right now in aquariums. All their colors are what they were when they were in wild (though some will change color under different lighting).

I do know what acropora it's not though! it's not A. Cervicornis or A. Palmata and thank god too! those two are critically endangered according to the IUCN redlist.

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